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NAAM E-NEWS – April 2016, Volume 18, Issue 2

April 19, 2016 in Newsletter

NAAM E-NEWS - April 2016, Volume 18, Issue 2

In This Issue

President's Message

By: Terry Ernest

Is there a future for Auto Museums?

That was the question I was asked not long ago when I was called for an interview by an East Coast based magazine. At first I was quite taken aback. Of course there is a future for Auto Museums, in fact it seemed initially like a stupid question. But the reality is that sometimes you must ponder difficult questions, and it is reasonable to consider the future of auto museums (or any business) in general. We should also consider what is our particular museum's motive to stay in business? Are we still "selling" what the public wants to buy? Are we relevant in today's society? Are visitors still coming through the door?

I hope you nodded your head yes to all of those questions. All of NAAM's member museums have a unique and compelling story to tell. Stories that need to be told. But beside telling your story, what are you doing to engage your visitors? Keeping visitors engaged and wanting to return is something that all successful museums must do. We all have concepts that work and some that don't. Why not share your experiences with other NAAM museums. Have a great idea? Or maybe something that didn't work out? Share it on the NAAM Forum at: www.naam.museum/forums/

Belonging to an association such as NAAM gives me an opportunity to talk to other museums and "pick their brains" about various topics. I had a discussion with a younger curator at a large museum recently about what young people want in their museum experience. I was thinking along the lines of more electronic displays and signage tags that they could scan with their ever-present phones. Things along those lines. The reality, he told me (and he was the age of the demographic we were discussing), was they wanted to see the actual artifact in person. They could certainly Google for whatever they were looking for and find out most, if not all, the information they wanted to know about the subject, but the part that was missing was something that their phone screen could not give them; the actual artifact in person. Their phone could not deliver the actual size, shape, color, or presence of the object. Another display that comes to mind is a hand cranked working cut-away Willys-Knight sleeve valve engine. The visitor can crank the engine to see how it functions and get a better understanding of how all the complex parts work together. And by turning it at their own speed it allows their mind to comprehend and readily understand better than a YouTube video could ever do.

So back to the original question, is there a future for auto museums?

Absolutely!

And by being a member of an organization like NAAM gives you a heads up on staying up with the ever changing world of museums. Utilize your membership in NAAM. Be active on the Forum. Ask question and answer the ones you can. Take a moment to chat with a colleague at another museum. It is amazing how these networking opportunities can pay off!

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MISSION STATEMENT

The National Association of Automobile Museums is a professional center of excellence for automobile museums and affiliated organizations that supports, educates and encourages members to operate according to professional standards of the museum industry.

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CURATORIAL NEWS

Aaron WarkentinFocusing Your Collection
By Aaron Warkentin

Consulting Curator for the Studebaker National Museum

Our museums have a purpose, that is to “collect, preserve and interpret.” I attribute that simple and succinct phrase to Leslie Kendall, Curator of the Petersen Automotive Museum. Those three words encompass a wide range of activities a museum performs. But what do these words mean for your institution? What are the mechanics behind this phrase?

In the first of my series of Curatorial Spotlights focusing on this phrase I will discuss collecting, because without a collection of objects, there is nothing to preserve or interpret.

Museums, by nature, are prone to hoarding, but we must temper that attitude. It is common for a museum to collect everything or anything that is even remotely related to its mission. But that creates a curatorial conundrum. These objects can create a backlog of registrar work stretching into years. The greater danger is losing focus of a museum’s unique story and mission. By creating and (sticking to!) a collections focus, your museum will use limited resources most efficiently. A specific collections focus lays the foundation for a coordinated interpretation plan that will tell your museum’s unique story.

Here is a real life example which many of my fellow curators will relate to. I once was a volunteer for a historical society. I was involved in auditing their collection that was on display. Once I came upon a corner of the museum that was overflowing with farming tools. I asked if they were significant to the local farming community. I was told there was no local connection - they were just old farming tools. “Bad museum!” is my internal rebuke, because that kind of collecting is neither helpful to the public or the institution. Those tools held no connection to the past of that community, they were not being used to illustrate a sector of the community’s life or economy, they had little to no interpretation and many were rusty and broken. Museums are NOT recycling or dumping grounds, yet we let ourselves be treated that way.

Be honest with a potential donor. You may only need a portion of what they are offering so tell them that is what you will accept. I once worked in a museum that had thirty boxes of magazines that were finally deaccessioned and designated for sale but no one wanted to take the time to deal with them so they consumed an entire closet that was needed for education materials. Of those thirty boxes only a slim eight or nine magazines were deemed appropriate for the archives. For all I know they are still in that closet to this day. So even when you decide to monetize duplicate materials, sorting through them still takes staff and volunteer time, so ask yourself if it is worth taking stuff you just do not need. Don’t ever take a donation you do not want because you believe or have been verbally promised a donation you do want - because you will never get it!

Create a collections focus and plan, in that order. What makes your museum unique, what local transportation history is there to tell? Once you identify the focus, create a plan: what do you need to fulfill your mission and collections focus? Create a wish list of autos and objects that you would love to acquire to help tell that story. Look carefully at your current collection and begin thinking seriously about finding new homes for items that are not contributing to your institution’s story and are taking up valuable museum real estate. Keep in mind it is our duty to care for the objects we take in - so be careful what you take! Don’t be that car museum which accepts the donation of a random car that has no purpose in telling your museum’s story. Because it will end up languishing in the corner of a gallery, or worse, the basement of the storage building. I will say more on that subject in my next article dealing with preservation.

I hope this article spurs discussion at our upcoming NAAM conference which is sure to be a thought-provoking event. I would love to hear your thoughts on this subject.

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NEWS FROM MEMBER MUSEUMS

Forney MuseumForney Museum of Transportation, Denver, Colorado

Experience Transportation History!

The Forney Museum of Transportation is a one-of-a-kind collection of over 600 artifacts relating to historical transportation. It began 60 years ago with a single 1921 Kissel, but soon expanded to include vehicles of all kinds. Today it includes not just vehicles, but also buggies, motorcycles, steam locomotives, aircraft, carriages, rail equipment, fire apparatus, public transportation, sleighs, bicycles, toys & diecast models, vintage apparel and much, much more!

Our collection highlights include: Union Pacific 'Big Boy' Steam Locomotive #4005, Amelia Earhart's 1923 Kissel 'Gold Bug',  Forney Locomotive, Colorado & Southern Caboose, 1923 Hispano-Suiza, 1913-53 Indian Motocycle Collection, Denver & Rio Grande Dining Car,  Stutz Fire Engine, 1888 Denver Cable Car, 1923 Case Steam Tractor, 1817 Draisenne Bicycle, 500 Piece Matchbox Collection, and more!

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Henry Ford Stamping Serial #1 on the first Model A

Henry Ford Stamping Serial #1 on the first Model A

Model A Ford Foundation, Nonantum, Massachusetts

The First Model A Ford

The Model A Ford Museum is proud to have on display the first of the more than five million Model A Fords produced.

As the long-awaited replacement for the Ford Model T automobile, the first Model A Ford rolled off the assembly line on October 20, 1927. This was only about 40 days prior to the official Model A introduction date of December 2, 1927. This car was a Tudor Sedan and has often been seen in Ford promotional photographs showing Henry Ford stamping serial number “1” on its engine block.

Henry presented this car to his best friend, Thomas A. Edison. When Henry later found out that Edison really preferred an open car, he had the Tudor Sedan body removed and replaced with a Phaeton body. This car, which has been slightly modified by Ford Motor Company factory personnel, is on loan from the Henry Ford Museum, Dearborn Michigan. Among the more than 25 Model A Fords on display, the Model A Ford Museum is also proud to feature two additional very early Model A Fords – with serial numbers 495 and 1209.

The Edison Phaeton, the first Model A

The Edison Phaeton, the first Model A

The Model A Ford Museum is located on the campus of the Gilmore Car Museum in Hickory Corners, Michigan. After many years of planning and fund-raising by the Model A Ford Foundation, Inc. (MAFFI), the long-awaited Museum was opened in May 2013.

The theme of the Museum is “A Stroll throughout the Model A Years.” The Museum exterior is a representation of a 1929 Ford dealership – complete with two tall Gulf gasoline pumps. The Museum interior was designed to display major historical, political and economic events that occurred during the tumultuous years of the Model A Ford. The vehicles used to carry out this theme begin with a Model T Ford and continue, in chronological order, with examples of the various Model A Ford body styles built between 1927 and 1931.

Visit the MAFFI website (www.maffi.org) for more information about MAFFI and the Model A Ford Museum.

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ChristineSan Diego Automotive Museum, San Diego, California

Star Cars

We are already pushing ahead with the next exhibit for the summer. Star Cars is already shaping up to be quite a winner! Pandora Paul, Director of Education, has managed to hunt down some spectacular vehicles from many different genres of film and television.

The star of the show will be an actual car (a 1958 red Plymouth Fury) used in the filming of Christine. Based on a book by Stephen King and directed by John Carpenter, Christine is the story of a car gone very, VERY bad!

We plan to have a screening of the film later in the summer. We will have a food truck in the parking lot that night so you can experience a unique version of dinner theatre at the museum. This exhibit will open June 4th.

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Becky BonhamStudebaker National Museum, South Bend, Indiana
Studebaker National Museum Announces the 2016 ”Champion”

The Studebaker National Museum proudly announces its 2016 “Champion” --  Rebecca J. Bonham. Mrs. Bonham will be honored at the Museum’s Fifteenth Annual Hall of Champions Dinner, on Thursday, April 21, 2016, at the Museum.

The purpose of the Hall of Champions Dinner is to honor an outstanding individual and/or company that has contributed to the success of the Studebaker Corporation, the Studebaker National Museum, the transportation industry or the auto collector hobby in an extraordinary way. The Award may also honor a South Bend area pioneering business which exemplifies the entrepreneurial spirit of the Studebaker family.

Under Becky’s leadership, the Museum secured funding to design and construct its new Chapin Street facility; she also successfully guided the Museum to become only the third automotive museum to achieve accreditation from the prestigious American Alliance of Museums. During her tenure, the Studebaker National Museum also secured a Save America’s Treasures grant from the National Parks Service to conserve its eight “National Treasures” which includes four Presidential carriages. In 2008, Becky worked with the Indiana Department of Transportation and the City of South Bend to convert the former “Jelly’s Bar” into the new Studebaker National Museum Archives building.

Becky has represented the Museum through several professional industry organizations, including the American Alliance of Museums, the Museum Store Association, the Society of Automotive Historians, as well as the National Association of Automobile Museums. She serves as a professional peer reviewer with the American Alliance of Museum’s accreditation program. She received the Governor’s Award for Excellence in Service, was the recipient of the St. Joseph County Chamber of Commerce’s prestigious Athena Award, The Studebaker National Museum is honored to induct Mrs. Rebecca J. Bonham into the 2016 Hall of Champions.

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OTHER NEWS

Call for Proposals

Putting Preservation on the Road: Protecting Our Overlooked Automotive Heritage in the Twenty-first Century
Date: October 20-22, 2016
Location: Historic Vehicle Association Research Laboratory, Allentown, Pennsylvania, USA
www.historicvehicle.org/putting-preservation-on-the-road/

The Historic Vehicle Association (HVA) and the Historic Preservation & Community Planning Program at the College of Charleston are pleased to announce the following call for papers for an international conference on the preservation of automotive heritage.

For much of the twentieth century heritage preservation primarily focused on sedentary objects (i.e., 1906 Antiquities Act in the United States, 1919 Historic Sites and Monuments Board in Canada, etc.). While some countries have studied and documented vehicles for preservation and/or conservation, their official recognition as landmarks or on registers of official distinction has largely been overlooked. This is most apparent within the field of automotive heritage. For example, within the United States there are over 90,000 separate listings for buildings, sites, structures, districts, and other objects on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). Vehicles on the NRHP include historic ships, railroad locomotives and streetcars, equipment related to the space age, and so forth – but not a single automobile or similar vehicle related to this form of transportation. This is also the case for the approximate 12,500 sites on the Canadian Register of Historic Places. Individual automotive vehicles by themselves are not listed as contributing elements – just the stationary buildings and sites. Considering that there is a precedent for both, such as moving ships and trains as well as stationary buildings and places on automotive heritage, the question becomes “why not automobiles?”Hence the newly-created National Historic Vehicle Register (NHVR), which can be used as a tool to carefully and accurately document the most historically significant automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, and commercial vehicles, as well as recognize the dynamic relationship between people, culture, and their means of transportation.The NHVR was developed by the Historic Vehicle Association (HVA) in partnership with the U.S. Department of the Interior in March 2013 to explore how vehicles important to American and automotive history could be effectively documented. Using Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) standards, this project is the first of its type to create a permanent archive of significant historic automobiles within the Library of Congress (see historicvehicle.org/national-historic-vehicle-register/).

The issue of overlooking historic vehicle preservation becomes further exasperated when we consider that none of the accredited programs in historic preservation and heritage conservation (more than sixty with the National Council of Preservation Education, a dozen with the National Roundtable of Heritage Education, among others in various countries) offer permanent coursework on the subject, let alone any other form of training or directed study. This is significant when we consider how much of our global economy, landscape, built environment, culture, and way of life across the world has been affected by the automobile. The NHVR is an important starting point in our efforts to study the role of automobiles in the formation of our cultural landscapes, but there is much work that must follow. Automobiles have been designed no less than buildings or furniture to engage with broader cultural phenomena, to answer – and indeed to inspire – human needs and desires that are inseparably intertwined with time and place. Furthermore, cars have been interpreted and re-interpreted by human beings in complex ways that often go beyond the intentions of their designers; they are cultural products not only of broad and powerful impact, but also of great complexity, and as such they must be contextualized in historical research if they are to be understood. Just because automobiles move should not be the disqualifying reason for not studying them. Indeed, we have lost much of our automotive heritage due to this lack of awareness, especially when considering that in the United States alone, prior to 1930, there were over 2,600 different automotive manufacturers. Today we are left primarily with the “Big Three” and a handful of minor manufactures. Not all pre-1930 companies were based in traditional places of manufacture Michigan, Bavaria (Germany), or Turin (Italy). For instance, South Carolina had its own independent companies, such as Anderson, during the 1910s and 1920s. Other countries too, whom we don’t normally think of as having their own homegrown auto industry, at one time did. Among these are the nearly forgotten Canadian manufactures Derby, Gray-Dort Motors, and Russell Motor Car Company. This local and regional heritage has largely been forgotten.

Suggested presentation topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Case studies of regional and local automotive culture and heritage, including those viewed through the lens of ethnic/regional studies (American studies, Women’s studies, material culture studies, studies of nomadic peoples, etc.)
  • Considering if there is a world automotive heritage, whether UNESCO or ICOMOS should be encouraged to get involved, and the role of FIVA (Fédération Internationale des Véhicules Anciens) as part of this.
  • Innovative ways to add the preservation of automotive heritage to the educational curriculum within colleges/universities, high schools, and technology schools.
  • Make better known the NHVR as an appropriate alternative to the NRHP for cars, trucks, motorcycles, and other vehicles: If “this place matters”, then by extension, there is the argument that “this car matters” too.
  • Using HAER/HABS techniques for studying and documenting historic vehicles, as well as exploring innovative techniques and tools through the use of new technologies
  • Reevaluating listed historic places and sites, as well as considering new places where buildings and landscapes (etc.) are tied with vehicles and people, in a more comprehensive designation that ties together the NHVR and NRHP, where both building/structure and car/vehicle elements are equally contributing.
  • Case studies of best practices related to preservation, conservation, restoration, adaptive reuse, and reconstruction of automobiles and associated material culture.
  • Recognizing important designers of automobiles in the same manner as architects.
  • Vernacular automotive design and use vs. haute design and auto racing preservation, in order to better understand the cultural meaning of vehicles for ordinary people in their everyday lives.
  • The approaches of allied fields in the preservation of automotive heritage, such as public history, archaeology, museum studies, cultural resource management, design/architectural history, etc.
  • Automobility and the environment, such as the rehabilitation of historic automobiles, and its relationships with energy efficiency, embodied energy and so forth in transportation (“is the greenest car one that has already been built?”)
  • Establishing standards for the proper treatment of historic vehicles so as to define what is appropriate preservation, rehabilitation and restoration. This can include the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, as well as the Standards and Guidelines for Conservation in Canada, among others, as well as qualification standards for the people who work on them. The Turin Charter (2012) can serve as a template for such standards in a similar way to the Athens (1933) and Venice (1964) charters do for buildings.
  • Preserving historic vehicle trades, maintenance and materials to prevent them from becoming a dying vocation through the preservation of automobiles in a manner similar to building trades professions. The way we once built and maintained cars is a fading practice, akin to traditional building trades (carpentry, plastering, etc.), especially when you consider that it is now standard for cars to no longer have an oil dipstick, let alone other DIY maintenance accessories.
  • Analyzing the contributions of automotive preservation heritage events, auto shows, museums, etc. to the economy and tourism – information that is not always fully included in Main Street programs and other economic development initiatives related to preservation planning.

The program committee invites proposals from people of all backgrounds and professions to participate – from senior professionals to students with innovative ideas –for the following:

1. Paper Session: We prefer to receive proposals for complete three to four paper sessions but will consider individual presentations as well. You are welcome to include a chair and/or moderator or the conference committee will appoint a chair. The entire panel presentation should span no more than 60 minutes.

2. Individual Papers: If accepted, we will place your individual presentation on a panel or roundtable selected by the committee.Paper presentations should span no more than 20 minutes.

3. Roundtables: Discussions facilitated by a moderator with three to five participants about a historical or professional topic or issue. Roundtables should span no more than 60 minutes.

4. Workshops/Demonstrations: Interactive presentations led by facilitators to encourage learning about a professional topic or issue. Workshops/demonstrations should span no more than 60 minutes.

5. Posters/Short Film: Interactive presentations produced and facilitated to encourage learning about a professional topic or issue. Poster presentations and short films should span no more than 10 minutes.

Please submit proposals of no more than 500 words and a brief CV/resume (two pages maximum) in a PDF or MS Word format to Barry L. Stiefel at stiefelb@cofc.edu. Deadline for proposals is May 15, 2016. Proposals should include the name(s) of presenters, affiliation/position and contact information. While the Historic Vehicle Association and the College of Charleston are based in the United States, and has influenced our worldview, we desire this to be an international conference and encourage the participation of others from elsewhere. The official language of the conference will be English, though presentations may be conducted in other languages. For people who desire to present in a language other than English,abstracts should be sent in the vernacular of the presenter as well as English to ensure the review committee can adequately evaluate. Decisions on proposals for the conference will be made by June 1, 2016.

From the conference we anticipate publishing an edited volume of scholarship with a distinguished press or journal.

For participants traveling more than 100 miles to Allentown, Pennsylvania (50 miles for students),assistance with travel and accommodations for the conferencewill be considered. Please provide a budget of what you need assistance within your proposal, as well as what other resources from which you anticipate receiving support. A registration fee will be required for the conference (likely around US$25 as part of the RSVP system), which will come with a one-year membership with the HVA.

Conference Organizers: Barry L. Stiefel, Assistant Professor, College of Charleston, stiefelb@cofc.edu

Mark Gessler, President, Historic Vehicle Association

Academic Committee:

Casey Maxon, Historic Vehicle Association

Nathaniel Walker, College of Charleston

Amalia Leifeste, Clemson University

Nancy Bryk, Eastern Michigan University

Jeremy Wells, Roger Williams University

Amanda Gutierez, McPherson College

Richard O'Connor, Chief for Heritage Documentation Programs, Dept. of Interior

Alex Gares, Canadian Automotive Museum

The Historic Vehicle Association and the College of Charleston also seek to encourage the support of historical/heritage and education-related institutions and organizations on the topic of automotive heritage preservation. Kindly contact Barry L. Stiefel at stiefelb@cofc.edu if you should be interested in showing your support, which will be recognized in the conference program and other materials, as appropriate.

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NAAM E-NEWS – February 2016, Volume 18, Issue 1

February 18, 2016 in Newsletter

NAAM E-NEWS - February 2016, Volume 18, Issue 1

In This Issue

president

President's Message

By: Terry Ernest

Occasionally a change in the Federal Tax Code can be a wonderful opportunity for our non-profit museums. One such change occurred last year when Congress passed the PATH Act, an omnibus bill that kept the government from shutting down, in December 2015. This bill contains a permanent extension of the IRA rollover, which is great news for charitably minded people in our museum community.

An IRA rollover gift is a tax-exempt distribution made directly from your IRA to your charity of choice. Qualifying individuals can make charitable gifts using pre-tax IRA assets rather than taking a distribution, paying income taxes and using after-tax assets to make a charitable gift. The gift can be up to $100,000 and does not show up on your tax return as income, which can avoid other tax consequences for higher income donors and also benefits lower income individuals who use the standard deduction because they don't have enough itemized deductions.

In order to qualify for the IRA rollover, you must be 70 1/2 or older. It is a great way for you to make a gift to support the causes you care about, and this gift can be used to meet your required minimum distribution (RMD).

This provision can truly enable generous individuals to make the gift of a lifetime. It is estimated that Americans have $5.3 trillion currently invested in IRAs. Thanks to decades of deliberate saving, some of today's retirees have more money in their IRAs than they need for daily living expenses and long-term care. And when these assets are passed on to their children they will be taxed at an ordinary income rates. Now charitable individuals and couples can make generous gifts to their favorite charities directly from their IRA tax free in 2016 and for the foreseeable future.

Please note: I am not a tax advisor, CPA or an attorney. I am simply bringing this up as a conversation starter within your organization. Please have a discussion with a professional in this field to see how this could affect your museum.

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MISSION STATEMENT

The National Association of Automobile Museums is a professional center of excellence for automobile museums and affiliated organizations that supports, educates and encourages members to operate according to professional standards of the museum industry.

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2016 ANNUAL CONFERENCE

What’s Trending: The New and the Next for Museums

Best practices and new opportunities are always evolving in the museum field, making it challenging to keep up. Trends in corporate partnerships, working with non-profit boards, interpretation, advocacy, and social media can offer new opportunities for museum staff and volunteers. How do we fold them into our work? In an age where relevance is mandatory, museums need to be nimble enough to respond to trends that will connect them with new audiences, and leverage their programs and unique collections to maximize engagement. Participate in the 2016 NAAM Conference to network with your peers and help shape the future of our museums.

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Early Bird Registration Deadline: April 5, 2016

The early bird conference registration fee for NAAM members is $300. When and Where: The 2016 Annual Conference will be hosted by the Seal Cove Auto Museum and Owl's Head Transportation Museum in Bar Harbor, Maine, May 3-6, 2016. The conference starts on Tuesday, the 3rd, with a Welcome Reception at the Atlantic Oceanside Event Center from 6 p.m. – 8 p.m. and concludes on Friday night, the 6th, with the closing banquet and NAAMY Awards Ceremony. The conference features excellent sessions and tours.  It will be a great professional development and networking opportunity. Please see the conference schedule and registration form.

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Atlantic Oceanside Hotel & Events Center

A Hotel Room Block is reserved for the conference. The room block expires on April 2, 2016, but make reservations early since rooms are in demand during this period. The room block dates begin on Monday, May 2, 2016, to accommodate our attendees traveling from the west. Also, the hotel is extending the conference room rate for three days before and after the block for anyone who would like to visit the area.

Hotel Room Block Info:

Group Number: NAAM050316; Room Rate: $99 (plus 8% room tax)
Atlantic Oceanside Hotel & Conference Center, 119 Eden Street, Bar Harbor, Maine 04609

Reservation Office: (800) 336-2463, Hotel: (207) 288-5801

Room Guarantee: Room deposits (one night’s room rate) are due at the time the reservation is made. Deposits are refundable, less a $20 administrative fee, 7 or more days prior to arrival date. Cancellations with 6 days prior to arrival are subject to a fee equal to one night’s lodging.

Additional Information

Transportation:
The closet local airport is the “Bar Harbor Airport” located just off the island in Trenton, 12 miles from Bar Harbor. The closest international airport is in Bangor, 50 miles from Bar Harbor. There are no regional bus routes that go to Bar Harbor, but the Bar Harbor Shuttle (www.barharborbangorshuttle.com) and Downeast Transportation (www.downeasttrans.org) provide service between Bangor and Bar Harbor. Local taxi services are available in Bar Harbor.

Weather: Average lows in Bar Harbor in May run in the mid-forties, with average highs in the mid-sixties. But there’s a saying in New England, “If you don’t like the weather, wait a minute!” Weather in early May in Maine can vary widely, from below-freezing nights to glorious spring-like days, so be prepared for anything!

Conference Dress: Attire for the duration of the conference is business casual, including the concluding banquet and awards ceremony.

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About Bar Harbor

Bar Harbor, Maine is the best known town on Mount Desert Island (MDI) with an approximate population of 5,235 residents. Included within the municipality are the villages of Bar Harbor, Hulls Cove, Salisbury Cove, and Town Hill. The main draw is nearby Acadia National Park, one of the most popular, yet smallest, National Parks in the system. Acadia boasts the tallest peak on the east coast, over 120 miles of trails, and a 44-mile carriage road system, closed to motorized traffic. But it’s the unique combination of lakes, mountains, and the rocky coastline of Maine that leave visitors to the Park breathless with wonder.

Some of the earliest tourists to the region were the “Rusticators”, the summer visitors of the early 1900s who fled to the “rustic” island from their luxurious homes in such cities as Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, to escape the heat and crowds. If the island served as a playground for these elite visitors, it also served as inspiration for many artists who also flocked to the island, particularly painters of the Hudson River School, like Thomas Cole and Frederic Church, glorifying MDI with their brushstrokes, and further encouraging others to visit the area.

Today Bar Harbor is more than a tourist destination. It is also an important research & education town, as the home to the Jackson Laboratories, the Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratories, as well as College of the Atlantic.

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Intersted in hosting a NAAM Conference?
Contact Wendell Strode
270-467-8814 strode@corvettemuseum.org

2016 NAAMY AWARDS COMPETITION

Deadline: March 4, 2016

Be sure to complete your entries for the NAAMY Award Competition by March 4, 2016. The process is simple, plus you can enter as many categories as you like and you many submit more than one entry in a category. Please see the attached NAAMY Awards Call for Entries brochure or access the brochure on the NAAM website (www.naam.museum) under “About NAAM.”

Every one of our NAAM member museums is asked to enter to gain important recognition for your museum, which is a primary benefit of earning a NAAMY award. NAAMY’s increase your museum’s prestige not only with your Board and your members, but in your community. Also, they are a point of interest with donors and when applying for grants.

It’s the perfect, “positive” project to start off your year! Our new “Call for Entries” brochure and application were distributed via email to all NAAM members and is available on the NAAM website.

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APPLY FOR A 2016 CONFERENCE SCHOLARSHIP

Deadline: April 4, 2016

Apply Now: Each year NAAM offers scholarships to the Annual Conference to help members grow professionally through informative sessions and networking opportunities. The scholarship program is designed for museums with limited financial resources (annual budgets less than $500,000) to pay for their staff to attend the conference.

When: You can apply anytime and we encourage you to do so to take advantage of this great benefit. The deadline is April 4, 2016.

How: Please visit the NAAM website for scholarship criteria, guidelines and the online application (select Conferences, then Conference Scholarships.)

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CURATORIAL NEWS

Derek MooreA Younger Generation in a New Year… Is it Possible?
By Derek Moore
Crawford Curator of Transportation
Cleveland History Center

Museums are facing a big problem, low attendance. Why? Because it seems that younger generations are starting to think that museums are old, dusty, and stodgy, and they feel they can’t relate. But is this really the case? Unfortunately, it is. Sorry, but I am the hard facts kind of guy and, yes, I am going to throw it in all of our faces. But fear not, here are some thoughts I have on why we might have these problems, and some thoughts on how we might be able to address the situation.

Thought Number One:

Most of our museums have vehicles that most people can’t relate to. Is it interesting to see a 1905 Peerless in the Crawford Auto Aviation Museum…to some, yes, to others, no. Does that Peerless fit our mission at The Crawford? Yes, so it is good to have it in the collection, but not everyone wants to see it. Where am I going with this? Well, we need to get creative and bring our collections in to the modern day, while still sticking to our mission. What do the youth of America connect with and how does that work with our mission? Let’s get creative!

But, what is creative? Well, here at The Crawford, I have started brainstorming a list of more modern vehicles for the collection. One of the cars that made its way onto that list is a Chevrolet Volt, of which I have already discussed with a local owner the possible donation of one. Now a Volt is not a classic car and it’s no antique car, heck it wasn’t even built in Cleveland, but it is technologically significant (part of The Crawford’s mission) and the “green technology’ movement is something the younger generation relates to. Maybe even more creative than a Volt might be a Dodge Ram pickup? Well, while I was at Henry Ford Museum a 1998 Dodge Ram quad cab pickup was acquired for the collection. It is in the collection to discuss the changing idea of a pickup truck from a work vehicle to a family vehicle, which has happened recently enough that younger visitors can connect to that story. You can see both of these vehicles I just mentioned in most parking lots in America, but unless we bring these vehicles into our museums and relate their stories to the younger generations in a way they understand, we will always be a stodgy, old museum.

So, get creative, start thinking about vehicles and artifacts from the modern day that can bring your collection into the 21st century and relate to the visitors of today while still fulfilling your mission. Sometimes it is difficult to think about change, but it has to happen to survive.

Thought Number Two:

Now this is where I get a little crazy, maybe even out of hand, and I am sure I will hear about it, but it has to be said… We need to bring the younger generation into the field and we need to listen to their ideas. I personally feel like I am in a weird position because I no longer look at myself as the “younger generation” in the field, but I am one of the youngest transportation curators in this country. Now, I am not here to say that those of us that are already in the field are washed up and have no good ideas, but I know that I am already out of touch with what people 10 years younger than I am are interested in… I hope that doesn’t mean I’m washed up!

I have had the opportunity to work with some very talented staff here in Cleveland that are much younger than I am, and some of them have had really great ideas, others, no so much. But, one thing I have personally been irritated by in my short time in the field (and maybe after this article, very short time in the field) are phrases like, “We’ve already tried that” or “It doesn’t work that way.” Maybe the idea that younger staff member has is the same as one that has been tried before and didn’t work, but maybe, just maybe, they have a different approach to that idea that will work. A different approach that might just relate to the generation that staff member belongs to. Give it a shot; we are all looking for ways to bring more visitors to our museums, aren’t we? It might just work!

Hire some younger staff, encourage their creative ideas to bring visitors of younger generations in the doors, teach them museum professionalism, invest in them and hold on to them. They are the future of our museums and without them, museums won’t have a future.

Complaint letters, emails, and phone calls can be directed to:

Derek E. Moore
Crawford Curator of Transportation
Cleveland History Center
10825 East Blvd.
Cleveland, Ohio 44106
DMoore@WRHS.org
216-721-5722 x1511

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NEWS FROM MEMBER MUSEUMS

Lincoln Motor Car Heritage Museum, Hickory Corners, Michigan

Will observe its second annual homecoming on August 12-14, 2016 at the museum, which is located on the grounds of the Gilmore Car Museum campus. The museum was created through a collaboration between the Lincoln Motor Car Foundation and the four major Lincoln car clubs: Lincoln Owners Club, Lincoln Continental Owners Club, Lincoln-Zephyr Owners Club and Road Race Lincoln Registry. The latter is serving as host of the 2016 event.  All Lincolns are welcomed at the annual homecomings.

The weekend events include a barbecue, motoring trip to the W. K. Kellogg Manor House and Kellogg Wildlife Sanctuary, gala dinner, and, of course, a car show. Complete weekend details and registration forms are available on the museum's web site: www.lincolncarmuseum.org

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San Deigo MuseumSan Diego Automotive Museum, San Diego, California
The British Invasion

The San Diego Automotive Museum in Balboa Park is proud to announce the opening of its new exhibit The British Invasion. The exhibit will run until May 31, 2016. This exhibit highlights British automotive manufacturing since the 1930’s. The exhibit is enhanced with the cultural impact the British have also had on our fashion, music, and literature (the Beatles, Harry Potter, Twiggy, Downton Abbey, etc.)

This exhibit features a 1933 Austin Seven, 1937 MG VA Tourer, 1939 Lagonda

V12, 1948 Bentley (prototype), 1950 Jaguar Mark V Saloon, 1951 Jowett Jupiter (pictured), 1953 Jaguar XK 120, 1955 Triumph TR2, 1958 Austin A35, 1967 Austin Mini Cooper S, 1967 Austin London Cab FX4, 1967 Rolls Royce Phantom V, 1969 Jaguar E Type OTS, 1970 Morgan 4/4 1600, 1971 Jenson Interceptor, 1972 TVR Vixen, and a 2005 Aston Martin. The London taxi was owned and driven by Frank Sinatra. The Rolls Royce Phantom was used by Queen Elizabeth, Princess Grace of Monaco, and several American astronauts.

The museum’s annual fundraiser is centered around this exhibit. That event will happen Saturday, March 12th from 6:00 – 9:00 PM. Call 619-398-0301 for information or tickets.

Regular hours are 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM (the last admission at 4:30 PM) The museum is closed Thanksgiving and Christmas. Admission prices are as follows: $9.00 for adults, $6 for seniors (65 and over), $5 students with ID, $4 children ages 6 – 15. Children under the age of 6 are admitted free of charge. The museum is free to all San Diego County residents and military with ID on the 4th Tuesday of each month. A small $2 fee is charged on some exhibits during Free Tuesday throughout the year.

The museum is located at 2080 Pan American Plaza, Balboa Park. Phone 619-231-2886. Website is www.sdautomuseum.org.

The San Diego Automotive Museum receives funding from the City of San Diego through the Commission for Arts and Culture and the County of San Diego’s Community Enhancement Program.

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New Executive DirectorStudebaker National Museum, South Bend, Indiana

STUDEBAKER NATIONAL MUSEUM ANNOUNCES NEW EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, PATRICK SLEBONICK

Studebaker National Museum Board of Trustees President, Michael Kendzicky, announces the hiring of Patrick Slebonick as Executive Director, of the Studebaker National Museum, effective February 1, 2016.

Prior to joining the Studebaker National Museum, Mr. Slebonick served as Associate Director at the Muscarelle Museum of Art in Williamsburg, Virginia. In that role he oversaw development, marketing, volunteer engagement, and outreach efforts for the Museum. He also served as project manager for numerous award-winning publications produced by the Muscarelle. Prior to becoming Associate Director at the Muscarelle Museums, Mr. Slebonick served as Manager of Institutional Advancement as well as Education and Media Specialist for the same institution.

Patrick Slebonick received his B.A. in Government followed by his M.Ed. with a concentration in the Social Foundations of Education from the University of Virginia. Mr. Slebonick then completed his JD from the William & Mary School of Law where he received the Mary Siegrist Hinz Fellowship before passing the Virginia Bar.

Mr. Slebonick also served as Program Director for the William & Mary School of Law Chapter of the Marshall-Brennan Constitutional Literacy Project. The program provided local high school students with engaging Constitutional Law lessons focused on the Bill of Rights. Patrick also held the position of Adjunct Professor of Law at William & Mary.

Current Board of Trustees President, Michael Kendzicky said, “Pat’s fresh perspective, museum experience, and enthusiasm, will help the Museum make a successful transition to a new leader.”

The Studebaker National Museum is located at 201 So. Chapin St., just west of downtown South Bend.  It is open Mon.-Sat., 10am-5pm, and Sun. Noon–5pm.   Admission is $8 for adults, $6.50 for seniors over 60, and $5 for youth ages 6-18.  For more information, please call the Museum at (574) 235-9714 or toll free at (888) 391-5600 or visit our website at www.studebakermuseum.org. For an additional cost, visitors may tour the exhibits and Oliver Mansion at The History Museum, which adjoins the Studebaker National Museum.

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OTHER NEWS

World ForumWorld Forum for Motor Museums
September 12th to 16th, 2016

In September 2016 the Auto & Technik MUSEUM SINSHEIM (Germany) will host the 13th World Forum for Motor Museums. There will be workshops, interesting papers and exchange of ideas. Trips to other museums (Mercedes-Benz & Porsche) and heritage locations are planned. More information: www.technik-museum.de/world-forum

Auto Literature, Toys

I have a collection car advertising brochures, mostly from the 1960s. I am willing to donate them to any museum that may want them. I also have some metal Dinky toy cars to donate. David McCoy, dmccoychicago@gmail.com

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NAAM E-NEWS – December 2015, Volume 17, Issue 4

December 15, 2015 in Newsletter

NAAM E-NEWS - December 2015, Volume 17, Issue 4

In This Issue

president

President's Message

By: Terry Ernest

Are You Getting Value for your NAAM Membership?

Membership Benefits

Listing on the NAAM Website with a Link to Your Website
Museums, which are members of NAAM, are invited to be listed on the NAAM site, which provides direct access to other member websites.

NAAM Forum
A password protected area for members to discuss and share concepts and ideas.

Quarterly Newsletter
This publication provides up-to-date information about what’s happening in the auto museum field.

Annual Conferences
NAAM annual conferences provide museum professionals with information and guidance in museum operations, networking opportunities, and stimulate an ongoing interest in automotive history. Conference fees are discounted for members.

“NAAMY Awards” of Excellence
NAAMYs are awarded annually at the NAAM Conference and further promote professionalism in automotive museum management and promotion. The awards are designed to recognize automotive/transportation museum leaders for achievement, professionalism and creativity. Categories include Collateral Materials, Newsletters and Magazines, Books and Exhibit Catalogs, Web Designs, Films and Videos, Interpretive Exhibits, Educational Programs, and Events and Public Promotions. Entry fees are waived for NAAM members.

Membership Directory
A membership directory is provided to members upon request.

All of the above reasons to be a member of NAAM are important. But I personally consider one of the most important reasons to be a member are the networking opportunities.

When I first joined NAAM, I noted the friendliness and professionalism of the members, and by attending annual meetings, I developed contacts with other museums that became valuable.

If you want to make your membership in NAAM more valuable, plan on attending our next conference in Bar Harbor, Maine, May 3 - 6 2016. Check the NAAM website under "conferences" for more information.

I would also like to take this opportunity to welcome one of NAAM's newest members, the Tbilisi Auto Museum in the Republic of Georgia (in the former Soviet Union). Their director, Ramaz Aivazashvili, contacted me a few months ago via the NAAM website to ask about becoming a member. A recent email from Ramaz, expresses why he is excited to be a new NAAM member: "First of all I want to thank you for so much attention to me and to my museum, this means a lot for me, as I am new in this field and try to move my museum forward.

Listing on the NAAM website with Link to our museum was (a) great success for us. When I saw our museum's Link on NAAM website I started calling everyone I know, and told (them) that Tbilisi Automuseum (has) become a member of NAAM!

I also use my username and password to log in on (the) NAAM website. (NAAM administrative assistant Lisa Panko really helped me with that and thank-you also for that).

As my country is developing, and new fields of social interest are created here, there are not so many ways to interact with newly created businesses, that is why NAAM means a lot for me as director of Tbilisi Automuseum.

I realize the meaning of (the) NAAM annual conference and when I heard about that, the hope was born that finally I'll be able to meet heads of successful auto museums and hear about their success and how they achieved that, what's the right way to move and the right steps to make. Despite, it will be hard but not impossible for me to attend NAAM annual conference in May 3 - 6 2016 in Bar Harbor, Maine, I should do it, because, that will be a key event for success of Tbilisi Automuseum. As (the) USA and (the) Republic of Georgia have a friendly relationship between each other, our businessmen and public figures often visit USA to be shared with experience, that's why I think that visiting Maine in May will not be very hard for me."

Thank you for your kind comments Ramaz, and welcome aboard!
If I may be of service to our membership, please contact me.

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MISSION STATEMENT

The National Association of Automobile Museums is a professional center of excellence for automobile museums and affiliated organizations that supports, educates and encourages members to operate according to professional standards of the museum industry.

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2016 ANNUAL CONFERENCE

What’s Trending: The New and the Next for Museums

Best practices and new opportunities are always evolving in the museum field, making it challenging to keep up. Trends in corporate partnerships, working with non-profit boards, interpretation, advocacy, and social media can offer new opportunities for museum staff and volunteers. How do we fold them into our work? In an age where relevance is mandatory, museums need to be nimble enough to respond to trends that will connect them with new audiences, and leverage their programs and unique collections to maximize engagement. Participate in the 2016 NAAM Conference to network with your peers and help shape the future of our museums.

About Bar Harbor

Bar Harbor, Maine is the best known town on Mount Desert Island (MDI) with an approximate population of 5,235 residents. Included within the municipality are the villages of Bar Harbor, Hulls Cove, Salisbury Cove, and Town Hill. The main draw is nearby Acadia National Park, one of the most popular, yet smallest, National Parks in the system. Acadia boasts the tallest peak on the east coast, over 120 miles of trails, and a 44-mile carriage road system, closed to motorized traffic. But it’s the unique combination of lakes, mountains, and the rocky coastline of Maine that leave visitors to the Park breathless with wonder.

Some of the earliest tourists to the region were the “Rusticators”, the summer visitors of the early 1900s who fled to the “rustic” island from their luxurious homes in such cities as Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, to escape the heat and crowds. If the island served as a playground for these elite visitors, it also served as inspiration for many artists who also flocked to the island, particularly painters of the Hudson River School, like Thomas Cole and Frederic Church, glorifying MDI with their brushstrokes, and further encouraging others to visit the area.

Today Bar Harbor is more than a tourist destination. It is also an important research & education town, as the home to the Jackson Laboratories, the Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratories, as well as College of the Atlantic.

Atlantic Oceanside Hotel & Events Center

A Hotel Room Block is reserved for the conference. The room block expires on April 2, 2016, but make reservations early since rooms are in demand during this period. The room block dates begin on Monday, May 2, 2016, to accommodate our attendees traveling from the west. Also, the hotel is extending the conference room rate for three days before and after the block for anyone who would like to visit the area.

Hotel Room Block Info:
Group Number: NAAM050316; Room Rate: $99 (plus 8% room tax)
Atlantic Oceanside Hotel & Conference Center, 119 Eden Street, Bar Harbor, Maine 04609
Reservation Office: (800) 336-2463, Hotel: (207) 288-5801

Room Guarantee: Room deposits (one night’s room rate) are due at the time the reservation is made. Deposits are refundable, less a $20 administrative fee, 7 or more days prior to arrival date. Cancellations with 6 days prior to arrival are subject to a fee equal to one night’s lodging.

Additional Information

Transportation:
The closet local airport is the “Bar Harbor Airport” located just off the island in Trenton, 12 miles from Bar Harbor. The closest international airport is in Bangor, 50 miles from Bar Harbor. There are no regional bus routes that go to Bar Harbor, but the Bar Harbor Shuttle (www.barharborbangorshuttle.com) and Downeast Transportation (www.downeasttrans.org) provide service between Bangor and Bar Harbor. Local taxi services are available in Bar Harbor.

Weather: Average lows in Bar Harbor in May run in the mid-forties, with average highs in the mid-sixties. But there’s a saying in New England, “If you don’t like the weather, wait a minute!” Weather in early May in Maine can vary widely, from below-freezing nights to glorious spring-like days, so be prepared for anything!

Conference Dress: Attire for the duration of the conference is business casual, including the concluding banquet and awards ceremony.

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2016 NAAMY AWARDS COMPETITION

Deadline: March 4, 2016

It time to start compiling your entries for the NAAMY Awards Competition. The deadline is March 4, 2016, so there is plenty of time to get your “winning” entries in the mail. The process is simple, plus you can enter as many categories as you like and you many submit more than one entry in a category. Please see the attached NAAMY Awards Call for Entries brochure or access the brochure on the NAAM website (www.naam.museum) under “About NAAM.”

Every one of our NAAM member museums is asked to enter to gain important recognition for your museum, which is a primary benefit of earning a NAAMY award. NAAMY’s increase your museum’s prestige not only with your Board and your members, but in your community. Also, they are a point of interest with donors and when applying for grants.

It’s the perfect, “positive” project to start off your year! Our new “Call for Entries” brochure and application were distributed via email to all NAAM members and is available on the NAAM website.

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APPLY FOR A 2016 CONFERENCE SCHOLARSHIP

Deadline: April 4, 2016

Apply Now: Each year NAAM offers scholarships to the Annual Conference to help members grow professionally through informative sessions and networking opportunities. The scholarship program is designed for museums with limited financial resources (annual budgets less than $500,000) to pay for their staff to attend the conference.

When: You can apply anytime and we encourage you to do so to take advantage of this great benefit. The deadline is April 4, 2016.

How: Please visit the NAAM website for scholarship criteria, guidelines and the online application (select Conferences, then Conference Scholarships.)

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CURATORIAL NEWS

Experimentation
Carly Starr
Curator of the California Automobile Museum

My favorite part of my job is creating the rotating exhibits. It is the most creative part of my job, I get to dive deep into automotive topics, and I am rewarded by hearing from new and different visitors with each exhibit. Not to say they don’t cause me a large amount of stress, but they are worth it, partly because rotating exhibits also give me an opportunity to experiment.

The California Automobile Museum is an active museum with a relatively small staff to organize everything, forcing all staff to be multi-faceted. This also means that our budget can be stretched thin. For example, until very recently, we did not have a development director, and saying that I am not very good at finding sponsors for my exhibits would not be inaccurate. However, despite (or maybe because of) these tight conditions, new ideas thrive when designing exhibits. Maybe it means writing object labels on the wall with paint pens. Maybe it means going without chains around the cars for the first time in our Museum. Maybe it means crowd sourcing stories before the exhibit even opens. There are many ways that myself and other staff have had to get creative in order to cultivate the best experience possible for our visitors.

We just recently opened a rotating exhibit on vintage travel trailers. While planning and building this exhibit, I was also taking part in a pilot program of learning collaboratives with the California Association of Museums. My topic is accessibility. While this included ADA standards and various disabilities and learning styles, we are also addressing issues such as cultural, language, education, and personal preferences. I could not help but be immersed in thinking about accessibility while building the trailer exhibit. I am not sure I succeeded to the extent that I would like to, but this has been yet another learning experience for me to build upon when designing future experiments for the Museum.

Everyone knows that you can’t please everyone, and, to me, this also translates to that you can’t be welcoming to everyone. What may be the most exciting thing for one person is also the most offensive thing for another. And this is not just for controversial topics such like religion or politics. It could simply be that I am only creating an exhibit for a narrow group of people. Sure, we all like to find ways to bring in the young visitors and the stereotypical wife that is dragged along by her husband. But what about everyone else? Finding the balance to create exhibits that are welcoming to as many people as possible – and the audience we are aiming to grow – will continue to be challenge as the Museum continues to grow.

For this most recent exhibit, vintage trailers from the 1930s, 40s, and 50s primarily speak to people with a sense of reverence or nostalgia for the American past. Yes, we have brought in many millennial and women who are excited to see this exhibit featuring a topic that is quite trendy right now. But do my foreign visitors understand? For Americans whose parents or grandparents were not middle or upper class, or even living in this country, do they enjoy this exhibit?

The volunteers working on this project and I did our best to write storyboards and placards to explain the trailer phenomenon as best as possible. I built multiple interactive to incorporate various types of interests in the exhibit. However, we do not have anything translated into other languages. Anything tactile is limited to a hands-on game because we understandably worry about damage and objects being stolen. Our exhibits committee can “sacrifice” a couple of the museum-owned cars as educational objects for visitors to sit in, but we cannot do that with privately-owned trailers. Overall, I feel as though this exhibit has been a achievement and we can be proud of it because it does excite that nostalgia in visitors while also addressing a major part of American automotive history, but I also feel as though there is more we can do for all of our visitors.

I am sure this is something that every museum deals with. Hopefully, it is something that every museum is looking to improve. And with each experimentation we act on, we take one step further to finding ways to be as welcoming to as many people as possible.

Some of those experiments I mentioned earlier are ones that I found extremely successful. Writing labels on the wall somehow made the material less intimidating and more fun; it was as if we were casually allowing visitors to see what car that hubcap goes to, no big deal. Going without chains was a huge success: visitors CAN be trusted! They also were able to look up close at the cars and left less of a need to open doors or other things than can happen. And finally, the stories people submitted before and during the Mustang v. Camaro exhibit this last summer was probably my favorite. At first, they came in quite slowly and I was worried, but the variety of hundreds of responses we received over the three months was more rewarding than anything I had experienced before.

In the end, keep experimenting. Keep finding ways to welcome people into the museum. The successes will be worth the failures.

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NEWS FROM MEMBER MUSEUMS

Gilmore Car Museum - Hickory Corners, Michigan
car

Celebrate the Gilmore Car Museum's 50th Anniversary with the all-new exhibit, "The Gilmore Collection: Celebrating the Past, Present, and Future," featuring cars from the Gilmore's original collection and special artifacts from the Museum's 50 year history.

Stay tuned for more details on this special collection and other upcoming exhibits, opening in December and January!

Lecture Series Begins Sunday, January 10th!
The 3rd annual Winter Lecture Series at the Gilmore Car Museum will kick off on Sunday, January 10th as we begin by celebrating the past with a look back at the last 50 years at the Gilmore Car Museum!

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OTHER NEWS

41 OLD HUBCAPS BECOMES INTERNATIONAL ART INITIATIVE
hubcap

Wilkes-Barre, PA (October 28, 2015) - In 2008, Ken Marquis, a Pennsylvania picture framer, had an epiphany while milling around an automobile show.

“I started rushing up and down vendor aisles buying old hub caps. I bought 41 rusted old hub caps that day. My friend thought I was crazy. I said ‘I have an idea’.”

Marquis’ idea has led to the largest non-profit international art and re-use initiative of its kind, The Landfillart Project. (www.landfillart.org)

1,041 hubcap “metal and plastic canvasses” are now 1,041 exceptional works of art -- kindling a powerful message of sustainable, green living and the transformative power of Art.

Imagine getting three artists to agree to any one thing. 1041 artists from every state in the U.S. and 52 countries – places like Austria, Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, and Denmark among many other nations - have re-claimed and transformed a discarded hubcap into astounding works of art.

A recent Landfillart exhibition at the Museum of Shenandoah Valley was the second highest attended event in their history. “Colorful, bright, expansive, delightful. I look forward to revisiting this exhibit numerous times,” --- one of many visitor comments to this exhibition.

flying_cars

The Landfillart exhibition will begin a multi-year international exhibition tour in 2016 to include major venues in places like Berlin, Barcelona, Monaco, Lyon, France, and Japan.

The new exhibition of the international Landfillart collection, On the Road Again, is now available to automobile museums.

On the Road Again is an engaging exhibition experience of America's love affair with the automobile and driving.

Underlying On the Road Again is the powerful cross-over message of living green, re-use/recycling, and the unifying creative force of Art. The exhibition is tailored to audiences that include schools, middle to university level, car lovers, and lovers of art.

To inquire about bringing On the Road Again to your museum, contact Shirley Howarth of the Humanities Exchange: s.howarth@earthlink.net, or Chris Miller, Landfillart: chriscom@epix.net.

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1903 Endurance Run

The project to focus on the 1903 Endurance Run is continuing with an emphasis on research and development of an exhibition and publication leading to a road event for Veteran and Vintage cars.

We still want to locate existing examples from the 1903 makes in the Run. There are nine surviving 1903 Franklins and we hope to have some participation in our event from them and any other models we can locate.

It turns out that the section of road used in the 1903 Automobile Endurance Run, the Ulster and Delaware Plank Road, was used in speed attempts for automobile travel between Chicago and New York City for several years after the 1903 Run. Apparently it was the best road at the time. In 1907 New York State issued county highway maps showing roads already 'improved' under contracts and road that would be 'improved' in future contracts. The section of road recently declared the Catskill Mountains Scenic Byway, now State Route 28, is this historic roadway and runs through the heart of the Catskill Park, a 700,000 acre State Park encompassing public and private lands, and the principle watershed for New York City.

I am looking for cars of the 1903-07 period and want to put the word out that this is a great place to gather Veteran and Vintage automobiles. If you can help please contact, Robert Selkowitz at artfolks@earthlink.net.

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Discounts for Members of NAAM Museums

The First Center for the Visual Arts in Nashville will open Bellissima! The Italian Automotive Renaissance, 1945-1975 (curated by Ken Gross) in May 2016. We would like to offer members of NAAM member museums 50% discounts on admission to the show which runs through Oct. 6. Last car exhibition, Sensuous Steel (also curated by Ken) drew 115,000 people from all over the world. We would love to make this offer to fellow auto lovers.
Take a quick look:fristcenter.org/calendar/detail/bellissima-the-italian-automotive-renaissance-19451975

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NAAM E-NEWS January 2015, Volume 17, Issue 1

February 18, 2015 in Newsletter

NAAM E-NEWS - January 2015, Volume 17, Issue 1

In This Issue

President's Message

By: Terry Ernest

Terry NAAM portrait CPT
More than a dozen years ago, when a group of local auto enthusiasts founded the Wills Sainte Claire Automobile Museum, we thought that operating an auto museum would be a lot like operating a business, and since some of them owned businesses, how tough could it be? Okay, I can hear some of you snickering... as you know, (and I NOW know) an auto museum is much, much more than just a business.

As we began struggling to understand our role in telling our unique story, I began looking for an organization that we could join and learn from. Fortunately for us we found the National Association of Automobile Museums, and promptly joined. Not only did I discover a group of warm and helpful folks who were willing to share their experience and give us advice on many areas of museum operations, but I found that attending the annual meeting was worth its weight in gold! By attending the programs and lectures, we had an opportunity to learn valuable lessons, some that we had not even considered.

To give you an idea of how important I feel these meetings are, I have only missed one NAAM annual meeting since joining. If you have attended an annual meeting before, and many members have attended quite a few, then you already know the value of networking, education and shared experiences in the auto museum industry. If you have not yet attended an annual meeting, then here is your opportunity to attend what promises to be a great one! This year’s meeting will be hosted by National Packard Museum Executive Director, Mary Ann Porinchak, and her staff in Warren, Ohio. There will be sessions available concerning subjects such as grant writing, exhibit planning, disaster planning, marketing and much more. We will also have an opportunity to visit the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection where we will be given a "backstage" tour.

It is my hope that you will create time in your schedule for yourself and key staff to attend the 2015 NAAM Conference from March 17th (5 p.m. Welcome Reception) to the evening of March 20th (Banquet and NAAMY Awards). Lodging, transportation. conference scholarships and dining information is posted on the NAAM website at www.naam.museum, under Conference and Events.

Top 8 reasons to attend the NAAM Annual Conference:

  1. Get excited. There’s nothing like spending time with people who share your interests to re-energize and inspire you.
  2. Learn what works. Sessions arm you with new skills you can put into practice right away.
  3. Tap the minds of leaders. This is your chance to ask the best and brightest leaders in the automobile museum community your most pressing questions.
  4. Expand your network. Share experiences, insights and perspectives with talented professionals who can help you succeed.
  5. Make your voice heard. At the NAAM annual meeting, you can meet with the NAAM Board of Directors to learn what NAAM is doing to enhance your membership.
  6. Become a stronger professional. We promise you’ll leave Ohio inspired, smarter and better than ever.
  7. Enjoy a fabulous destination. Two days of sessions and a day of touring two fabulous museums will make your experience memorable.
  8. Save money. Register early to save $50 off the registration fee when you register before February 18, 2015.

If I may be of assistance, please contact me at: willsmuseum@sbcglobal.net

MISSION STATEMENT

The National Association of Automobile Museums is a professional center of excellence for automobile museums and affiliated organizations that supports, educates and encourages members to operate according to professional standards of the museum industry.

2015 ANNUAL CONFERENCE

When and Where: The 2015 Annual Conference will be hosted by the National Packard Museum in Warren, Ohio, March 17 - 20, 2015.  The conference starts on Tuesday, the 17th, with a Welcome Reception at the Residence Inn Marriott from 5 p.m. – 8 p.m. and concludes on Friday night, the 20th,  with the closing banquet and NAAMY Awards Ceremony.  The conference features excellent sessions and tours.  It will be a great professional development and networking opportunity. Please see the attached conference schedule and registration form.

CONFERENCE HOTEL ROOM BLOCK AVAILABLE

Make Your Reservations: A hotel room block is now ready for reservations at the following hotel for the 2015 NAAM Annual Conference:

Residence Inn Marriott (at the Eastwood Mall)

Use Reservation Code: NAAM

5555 Youngstown-Warren Road
Niles, Ohio 44446
(330) 505-3655
Rate: $125 plus taxes and fees
Please see the attached lodging form.

The Residence Inn is the sponsor and site of the Welcome Reception

The Residence Inn Warren/Niles is a brand new (opened in June 2014) extended stay hotel connected to the Eastwood Mall for convenient access to many shopping and dining options. The hotel offers spacious studio, one- and two-bedroom suites with separate living and sleeping areas and fully equipped kitchen. (Complimentary grocery delivery service is available to fill your refrigerator and satisfy cravings.) The Residence Inn offers free Wi-Fi, free hot breakfast and evening social hours offering appetizers and drinks for your convenience. The hotel also features an indoor pool and spa and 24 hour fitness center.

NAAM’S FIRST ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

LISAThis January, NAAM achieved a long sought goal by hiring its first administrative assistant. What an auspicious start to our twenty-first year!

Six years ago, at a board retreat, we concluded that in order to truly fulfill our mission to support and educate our members, we needed to hire an administrator. We have finally put all the pieces in place and we are pleased to announce that Lisa Panko has accepted the position. Lisa is not a new face at NAAM. Some of you may know her as our membership coordinator. Lisa will be continuing in that role and will also assume the duties of newsletter editor, along with other duties.

Lisa is the membership and business manager for the National Automobile Museum in Reno, Nevada, a position she has held for 10 years. (She will be performing her NAAM duties on a part-time basis.) Previously, she was the product sales manager for the Girl Scouts of Sierra Nevada. Lisa is third generation Nevadan and received her Batchelor of Science degree from the University of Nevada, Reno. Her first car was a 1962 Ford Fairlane that she still regrets selling to this day as many people do.

With Lisa on board, NAAM will be able to provide more timely support and additional services for our members. In 2014, NAAM became an affiliate member of the American Alliance of Museums, which provides Lisa with access to AAM’s rich online and print resources.  Lisa can then use these resources to help you solve some of your museum questions, or at least get you pointed in the right direction.

To contact Lisa, please email her at lpanko@automuseum.org or phone her at (775) 333-9300. Lisa will be attending our 2015 conference March 17-20 hosted by the National Packard Museum in Warren, Ohio, where you will all get a chance to meet her.

Welcome aboard, Lisa!

CURATIONAL NEWS
Volunteers and Collection Vehicles

derek

As museums we rely heavily on, and are grateful for, our volunteers. They do everything; from manning our guest services desks, being docents/interpreters in our galleries, working in our education departments, and so on and so on. Then there are those volunteers that want nothing more than to help work on the collection vehicles. We all have them, and we all appreciate them. However, we have to keep in mind the safety of our collections when we have volunteer help with its preservation. This is not to say that these volunteers have malicious intents when they work on our collection vehicles, rather it is to remind us that we have to teach our volunteers about museum best practices.

Volunteers come from all walks of life. I will use my volunteers as an example, many of them are retired mechanical or electrical engineers, some worked in the lubrication industry, others worked for public services, and many worked in the automobile industry, but none have worked in the museum field. What does this mean for us as museums? It means that these volunteers are not familiar with the way we care for and treat our artifacts, but it doesn’t mean that these generous people who want to give us their time can’t learn from us.

Most of the volunteers who want to work with our collection vehicles already have a passion for cars; many have worked on cars all their life and own classic or antique automobiles. So, it is our job to take that knowledge they have and use it to help us carry out our best practices, a benefit for both the institution and the volunteer.

Nothing makes me cringe more than when I am at a museum and see a volunteer doing something that isn’t quite up to best practices. One example of this that I have seen was a volunteer at a museum that used a brass headlight on one of the vehicles as a coat rack. The volunteer was a very talented person, but didn’t give thought to what damage might occur from the small act of hanging their coat on that brass headlight. This wasn’t the volunteer's fault; the supervisory museum staff member had never told the volunteers not to hang their jackets on the cars.

How do we handle this then? I again will turn to my volunteers at The Crawford as an example. When I came on board at the museum the volunteers did not have a lot of directive in what they were doing with the collection vehicles. They would mainly get vehicles that needed to run for a show running, but there was no protocol on how to do this. So, they used the knowledge they had about cars and got the vehicles running, and were successful in doing so. But, were museum best practices upheld on how the vehicles were handled during the work to make them operable? Were best practices upheld while they were being driven? Were best practices being followed when the vehicles were shut down to go back on display or put in storage? Not really, and it wasn’t the fault of the volunteers. The staff in charge had not talked to them about best practices. Thus, the first thing I did with the volunteers was to pull them together as a group and discuss best practices with them and as we go along continue to remind them of best practices. It has now come to a point where my volunteers remind me to push them harder to make their work up to museum best practice standards.

In the long and short of it, what am I saying here? Volunteers are often the life blood of our institutions. They are the reason we can do most of what we do in our respective museums. So, let’s take this gracious gift they are offering and use it to the benefit of our institutions. Let’s teach this wonderful group of people about the museum field and why we do what we do and hold ourselves to best practices. If your volunteers are anything like mine, they will appreciate the opportunity to learn new things, especially when it relates to something they love, like cars.

NEWS FROM MEMBER MUSEUMS

America’s Car Museum – Tacoma, Washington

father son_medres_lemay(1)

America’s Car Museum, the largest automotive museum in North America, is continuing to garner awards. The latest comes from USA Today, which has named ACM as one of the 10 best museums in the Seattle, Wash., metropolitan area.

“ACM earning a spot on USA Today’s 10 Best Museums in Seattle list shows that our hard work is continuing to pay off in connecting with and captivating our visitors,” said David Madeira, ACM president and CEO. “We see ACM as an enveloping cultural experience instead of just another stationary car museum, constantly rolling out new ideas and exhibits. That’s what sets us apart.” In November 2014, ACM finished ahead of 74 other finalists to earn the title of “Best Museum in Western Washington,” according to KING 5 NBC.

USA Today said ACM is one of the “hottest” museums in the Pacific Northwest. It added that ACM’s Signature Events, such as June’s “Wheels & Heels Annual Gala” and August’s “Cars & Cigars,” with tastings from Seattle’s El Gaucho restaurant and Montecristo cigars, present an atmosphere “oozing with innovation and indulgence.”

The Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles – Boyertown, Pennsylvania

The Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles will spend 2015 staging a year-long celebration of its 50th Anniversary. Founded in 1965 by Paul and Erminie Hafer, the Boyertown Museum preserves and educates about Pennsylvania’s rich road transportation history. The Museum kicked off its 50th Anniversary with a Golden Gala on Saturday, January 17, from 5 p.m. - 9 p.m. This event, which is open to the public at $10 a person, will highlight some of the Museum’s history and its founders. Included in the Golden Gala’s festivities will be hors d’oeuvres and wine, with a champagne toast scheduled for 7 p.m. Throughout the evening, photographs and video footage of the Museum through the years will be featured, as well as entertainment and music.

Kokomo Automotive Museum – Kokomo, Indiana

The Kokomo Automotive Museum is proud to announce its fall and winter special exhibit, “Cadillac - Setting the standard for personal luxury: 1938-1997.” Starting with the fabled 1938 Series 60 Special Cadillac, which through engineering and advertising modernized the public perception of what a luxury car should be. The exhibit can be seen at the Kokomo Automotive Museum, located at 1500 North Reed Road in Kokomo, Indiana, from now until March 29, 2015. For more information, contact the museum Tuesday through Sunday at (765) 454-9999.

Seal Cove Auto Museum – Seal Cove, Maine

1904Searchmont(1)
The Seal Cove Auto Museum is delighted by its new acquisition, a 1904 Searchmont Touring. Acquired by the Richard C. Paine Jr. Automobile Charitable Trust for display at the Seal Cove Auto Museum, it is one of two Searchmonts known to exist. Its previous owner, Bob Ames, also owned the Curved Dash Oldsmobile in the museum’s collection, and Mr. Ames has driven both the Searchmont and the Olds in the prestigious London to Brighton Run. The design of the 1904 Searchmont reflects the Auto Company’s complete change in the design of its cars in 1903, the new design following French lines. More information on the 1904 Searchmont can be found at: sealcoveautomuseum.org/collection/vehicle_list.php?vehicle=99


Studebaker National Museum – South Bend, Indiana


Studebaker National Museum – South Bend, Indiana

To kick off the SB150 “Discover . . . South Bend” series on January 19, the Studebaker National Museum was one of over a dozen different South Bend gems opening their doors for “Discover . . . South Bend Landmarks.” Each participating institution offers free admission for guests to discover and explore new parts of the amazing places that make South Bend great.

Guests at the Studebaker National Museum will have the unique opportunity to “peek underneath” as we open the hoods of our revered Museum vehicle. This is a rare chance to look inside our collection of vehicles spanning late 19th through early 20th century vehicles, showcasing the best of South Bend innovation and ingenuity. Additionally, guests can visit the first floor of the Studebaker National Museum Archives (located across the street from the Museum) and see pieces from our collection, as well as learn about the tremendous work it takes to preserve and share our City’s rich industrial history.

This event took place on January 19, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. with free admission, in celebration of the SB150 kickoff and the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. Other participating sites included the IUSB Civil Rights Heritage Center, the Birdsell Mansion, the Kizer House, and more. A complete listing of participating “Discover . . . South Bend Landmarks” institutions can be found at SB150.com.

World of Speed Museum – Wilsonville, Oregon

World of Speed Museum – Wilsonville, Oregon

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World of Speed is thrilled to announce the renewal of our Woodburn Dragstrip Jr. Drag Racing Series title sponsorship. New this year, the age limit to participate has been expanded to include five to seven year olds, giving even younger kids the chance to race down the track in a half scale version of a Top Fuel dragster in a safe and controlled environment. Join us in support of these amazing racers come April.

“A key component of World of Speed is to provide an exciting environment in which young people can explore the world of motorsports and the many career opportunities it offers,” said World of Speed executive director Tony Thacker. “We had so much fun working with the kids last year, it was a no-brainer to serve as title sponsor again in 2015.”

All events are held at the Woodburn Dragstrip, 7730 Hwy 219, Woodburn, Oregon, located one mile west of the Woodburn Premium Outlet mall.


DO YOU HAVE NEWS?

Send it to our new editor.

Please share news about your museum with our new NAAM E-News editor. Be sure to add Lisa Panko, lpanko@automuseum.org, to your museum's distribution lists for news releases, e-news, and member and media announcements (and delete Kristy Ketterman). Many automobile museums are members of NAAM, but little information is received for our newsletter. Please help us ensure NAAM E-News is informative and up-to-date with the latest activities of our members.

NAAM E-NEWS – July 2014, Volume 16, Issue 3

August 16, 2014 in Newsletter

NAAM E-NEWS - July 2014, Volume 16, Issue 3

In This Issue

  • President’s Message
  • Mission Statement   Same as last issue
  • Job Opportunity with NAAM
  • NAAM Survey
  • Marketing News
  • Curatorial News
  • News from Member Museums  Same layout as last issue, new info
  • Board of Directors
  • NAAM E-News Contact
  • Classified Ad Notice
  • Membership Application

President's Message

By: Terry Ernest

Do you have an emergency plan in place for your museum?

None of us ever really think an emergency will happen to us, right?  But sometimes, out of nowhere, a disaster strikes!  The National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Kentucky suffered a sinkhole, the National Auto Museum in Reno, Nevada had an arson fire, and from my own personal experience, the car I was driving about three weeks ago was struck by lightning (we're okay).

So these examples beg the question; Do you have an emergency plan in place?  If you already do, great!  But has it been updated lately?  Has your staff reviewed it and practiced it recently?

And what if you do not have a policy in place for emergencies?  Where do you start to develop a plan?

This is where your NAAM membership can be of tremendous assistance.  On the NAAM website at www.naam.museum in the "Forum" area (make sure to log-in first) you will find it under the heading "Administration" and then "Policy and Procedures – A Place to Share", two documents that will be helpful to get you started.  The first is the NAAM Collections Management Policy, which has a section in it titled "Risk Management" (as a NAAM member you can download the entire collection for no charge).  The second useful document is shared by the Gilmore Museum under the same "Policy and Procedures – A Place to Share", section as "Gilmore's Emergency Plan".  You may wish to use these two resources as a starting point to begin your Emergency Plan project.

Once you have created your Emergency Plan and put it in place, please share it with your fellow members in the Forum section of the NAAM website.  As we collaborate on projects like this, adding our own museum's emergency plan, our Forum becomes more valuable as a place to obtain and accrue knowledge.

If you haven't visited the Forum on the NAAM website (or haven't visited in a while) please take some time to see what you can learn and what you can contribute to help others in our industry.

If I may be of assistance, please contact me at:  willsmuseum@sbcglobal.net

In the words of C. Harold Wills (President & Founder of the Wills Sainte Claire Automobile Co.), "If you aim high, you will never shoot low."

MISSION STATEMENT

The National Association of Automobile Museums is a professional center of excellence for automobile museums and affiliated organizations that supports, educates and encourages members to operate according to professional standards of the museum industry.

JOB OPPORTUNITY WITH NAAM

NAAM Seeks Administrative Assistant

NAAM has an opening for a contracted, part-time administrative assistant who will be responsible for developing and implementing a variety of administrative tasks.  This will be an ideal position for someone who has excellent administrative skills and an outgoing, promotional aptitude.  It will be necessary to work independently, as well as in committee and board situations.  Please see the attached job description and email a resume to NAAM President, Terry Ernest:  willsmuseum@sbcglobal.net
CLICK HERE FOR THE JOB DESCRIPTION

NAAM SURVEY

To better serve the member museums, the NAAM Board of Directors will be conducting an electronic two-part survey through Survey Monkey. Member museums that wish to have a survey mailed to them should request surveys through NAAM President, Terry Ernest.  (Email: willsmuseum@sbcglobal.net)

You will soon receive notification of dates when survey will begin.  This very important survey will provide insight into the future needs and direction of member museums and the NAAM organization.

MARKETING NEWS



Museums and Facebook Feedback
It is important to remember that marketing is all about communication.  You have exhibits, memberships, programs and much more.  Your potential visitors want to see exhibits, become a member and learn.  You have what they want; they just don’t know it yet.  One of the best ways to reach out to potential clients and customers is to do it through social media.  We’ve discussed tweeting, but do we all take advantage of Facebook as much as we should?

Facebook is a person-to-person network that often is underutilized.  Having a visitor talk about your museum or share pictures of themselves enjoying your museum is the best marketing you can ask for – and even better…it’s FREE!

On average a Facebook user has approximately 130 friends, but research has shown that those who actively use the “Like” button for places of business, such as your museum, on average, have twice as many friends.  Each time someone chooses to “Like” your museum, you have a potential for 130 or more new friends, visitors and followers just through this one person!

Personal recommendations aren’t a new school of thought in marketing, however with Facebook, the ease with which one can share recommendations to hundreds of friends at a single time has never been simpler.  It is less about you and what you want to say and more about what your visitors are saying and encouraging them to say it.

There are lots of ways that you can make it effortless for people to learn about and share information with their friends about your museum.

Encourage your website visitors and people you email to become a fan of your Facebook page by providing a link to a “social sharing” button.  These buttons can be added to your website or email through a simple line of code so that when someone clicks on the button, they are directed to your Facebook page where they can “like” your Museum and become a fan.  From here, they can tag themselves while they visit your museum alerting their entire network that they enjoy spending time viewing your exhibits and attending your special programs.

Another way to promote your museum on Facebook is through asking for reviews.  Opening a new gallery? Have an interactive exhibit you want people to know more about?  Ask visitors to visit your Facebook page and write a review of what they have experienced.  Encourage them to share pictures.  This is a surefire way to get others excited.  I know I am likely to visit someplace that I see a friend visiting and having a great time – who wouldn’t?

At the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum we have made flyers that we encourage visitors to pick up as they leave.  It has all of our social media information on it so that we can easily be found and it encourages visitors to share their thoughts, feedback, and pictures with us online.  When visitors do this, all of their friends see the pictures and comments posted as well as all of the thousands of the museum followers or fans.

Remember, social media shouldn’t always be focused on what you want to say; rather it should be about what people are saying about you!  Encourage people to talk about your museum!

CURATORIAL NEWS



Digital Signage: Attraction or Tool?

Digital Signage, and more specifically touch-screens, can be an appealing addition to any museum.  It is the use of a current technology that can allow adaptability and curb appeal.  A museum must always ask itself how and why it wants to incorporate a new form of interpretation.  Is it to attract more visitors or to engage the visitor with deeper meaning?  Or can it be both?

When our museum made the decision to invest, we endeavored to do both.  Digital technology is one of the most important forms of communication today.  If I plan to live in Germany, I learn German.  If we plan to engage with the current and future generations, we learn to use digital technology such as touch-screens.  Digital signs also allow us to provide large amounts of information which would clutter the museum walls if displayed in a physical format.  We can also present archival materials that would otherwise be compromised by frequent handling.

With a touch-screen, visitors can now select what they desire to learn without having to wade through large amounts of information in the hopes of finding a nugget of interest.  In the example of our digital car signs, the visitor may select from different topics such as mechanics, styling, the history of the car and its owners and a section called ‘In The News,’ which highlights vintage advertisements and both national and world events of the vehicle’s time.  We also have educational questions which can be incorporated into both general visitation and formal study trips.

When creating digital signage, be aware of your resources, both in manpower and funding.  Digital signage can be a time-consuming proposition.  How you will utilize the sign and how many you will deploy will determine the amount of hours required.  If each sign has specific information related to particular objects, or automobiles, this will require research and inputting.

Think about the information you want to present.  It is easy to load the sign with every image, blueprint and diagram for a specific vehicle you are showcasing.  Just as in printed signs, use the basic interpretation rules of brevity: have a focused message and don’t create unanswered questions.  We only use ten images per topic on our digital car signs.  We have found any more than that, the visitor will not view.  We also create two-sentence captions for each image.  The visitor can only read a certain amount of information before reader fatigue sets in.

Digital signage is a daunting task, but it can provide a host of opportunities.  Take time to determine why and how you will use digital signage.  Who is your audience and what are you trying to tell them?  These simple questions will help you determine the scope and breadth of your project and help you avoid planning more digital signs than you have the resources to create.


DO YOU HAVE NEWS?

We want to hear from you.

Please share news about your museum with the NAAM E-News editor. It's time to double check to make sure Kristy Ketterman, kristy.ketterman@gmail.com, has been added to your museum's distribution lists for news releases, e-news, and member and media announcements.  Many automobile museums are members of NAAM, but little information is received for our newsletter.  Thanks for helping ensure NAAM E-News is informative and up-to-date about the latest activities of our members.

NEWS FROM MEMBER MUSEUMS

Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles – Boyertown, Penn.

The Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles, in conjunction with the current exhibit Woodrow Wilson, President Electric: Harnessing the Power of Innovation in the Progressive Era, will be hosting a special presentation on Saturday, August 9, 2014, at 2 p.m. on the history of the Lincoln Highway.  Professor Fred Gantz of Harrisburg Area Community College will be giving a talk entitled, “The Lincoln Highway: A Road through History,” complete with photographs and artifacts.  The Lincoln Highway, the first transcontinental highway for automobiles in the United States, was dedicated in 1913 during President Wilson’s administration.

Seal Cove Auto Museum (pics saved) – Seal Cove, Maine

The Seal Cove Auto Museum is hosting a picnic on Sunday, August 10, 2014, from 3 to 6 p.m. on the lawn overlooking Seal Cove Pond and the mountains of Acadia. Inspired by the early 1900s rusticator tradition, the 2014 Rusticator Picnic will feature rusticator-inspired food, live jazz by the Ellis Quartet, Native American baskets with commemorative wine glasses to take home and a special exhibit of period fashion from the collection of Norma Spurling. Period costumes are encouraged, and prizes will be awarded. In the event of rain, the picnic will be held indoors. Advance tickets are required; please contact the Museum to purchase by phone at 207.244.9242.

 

The Antique Automobile Club of America – Hershey, Penn.


The opening of the display of the Cammack Tucker collection of vehicles and memorabilia has been a frequent question on the minds of visitors to the Antique Automobile Club of America (AACA) Museum in Hershey. This highly anticipated exhibit has been more than a year in the making from accessioning artifacts to the exhibit design. [READ MORE]

Exhibit construction will soon begin with volunteer assistance from Pyramid Construction of Wormleysburg, Pennsylvania. Pyramid Construction will be lending two - three of their workers for two weeks to help build the exhibit facades. Pyramid is no stranger to the AACA Museum; they were one of the original contractors chosen to build our Museum more than 11 years ago. The first phase of the Cammack Tucker Gallery is slated to open in October of this year. An official opening announcement release will be coming later in the month with more details

The AACA Museum is still looking for support both in funds and with skilled carpentry/construction hands. If you or your organization is willing to assist us with this project, please contact us at exhibits@aacamuseum.org.

Please join the AACA Museum this year in enjoying a celebration of some of the most beautiful and meaningful cultural objects created by America, in one of the world’s premier motor museums. This exhibit celebrates and commemorates Indian’s exciting re-entry into the marketplace this year.

 

 

NAAM E-NEWS – June 2014, Volume 16, Issue 2

May 25, 2014 in Newsletter, Uncategorized

NAAM E-NEWS - June 2014, Volume 16, Issue 2

In This Issue

  • President’s Message
  • Mission Statement   
  • 2014 Annual Conference 
  • 2014 NAAMY Award Winners
  • 2014 Conference Scholarship Recipients
  • Job Opportunity with NAAM
  • Curatorial News 
  • Retail Opportunities
  • Donation Offer

President's Message

PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE
By: Terry Ernest

I am honored to be serving as the new NAAM President.  My name is Terry Ernest, Director of the Wills Sainte Claire Automobile Museum in Marysville, Mich.  I was quite pleased when 10 years ago I learned of an association devoted to automobile museums. As head of a relatively new auto museum (founded in 2001), I was excited by the opportunity to learn how to operate a museum the "correct" way, and in accordance with the principles of established auto museums.  What a wonderful journey of learning it has been!  One of the many things that impress me about NAAM is the professionalism that is exhibited by the many member museums that I have met.  What also impresses me is the passion that our members have for the auto museum industry and their willingness to share their knowledge.  Because of this passion, I see a bright future for our organization.

As the new President, I would like to thank our immediate Past President Jackie Frady for her leadership over the past 3 years.  Jackie has worked diligently to keep NAAM moving forward, and has provided continued value to our membership.  Jackie's talent and enthusiasm for NAAM is endless.  I can only hope to emulate her in my time in this position.  I would also like to thank the board of directors for their dedication and continued support.

With the annual conference at the Petersen Automotive Museum wrapped up, we can continue to share the energy from this exciting meeting at the NAAM Forum on our association's website, www.naam.museum.  By sharing your opinions, questions and answers on the Forum, we can keep the spirit of the annual meeting alive all year!   Have you visited the website today?

If you have any questions or suggestions about our association, please feel free to email me at willsmuseum@sbcglobal.netor call my office at 810-987-2854.

In the words of C. Harold Wills (President & Founder of the Wills Sainte Claire Automobile Co.), "If you aim high, you will never shoot low."

Mission Statement

The National Association of Automobile Museums is a professional center of excellence for automobile museums and affiliated organizations that supports, educates and encourages members to operate according to professional standards of the museum industry.

2014 ANNUAL CONFERENCE
NAAM And World Forum

We sincerely thank The Peterson Automotive Museum for hosting a remarkable joint conference for NAAM and the World Forum for Motor Museums in Los Angeles, Calif. from March 24 - 28, 2014.  We especially thank former NAAM Board member and The Petersen’s Chief Curator Leslie Petersen for proposing the idea of a joint conference and bringing it to reality, Executive Director Terry Karges for generously supporting the program, Associate Curator Mary Brisson for coordinating endless details and the Petersen team for their assistance in many areas. There were 119 attendees representing 10 different countries, nine informative sessions, five tour destinations, four scholarships awarded and 26 NAAMY Awards presented at the festive closing banquet.

The conference began with a welcome reception on a delightful period street setting at The Peterson on Monday evening, March 24, with an abundance of food and beverages. It was a great opportunity to meet new attendees and greet special friends and associates from Australia, Belgium, Canada, Germany, Greece, Japan, New Zealand, Switzerland, UK and USA.

Sessions on Tuesday and Thursday offered valuable information with national and international perspectives relevant to the conference theme, “Attracting New Audiences.”  Wednesday and Thursday featured tours of the Bruce Meyer Collection, the Art Center for Design in Pasadena, the Nethercutt Collection, Mullin Museum and Malamut Collection.  It was sensory overload at its best.  Evenings throughout the conference featured unique activities, including a reception, dinner and touring the Toyota Auto Museum, thanks to NAAM Board member Susan Sanborn; shuttles to explore the Santa Monica Third Street Promenade; a movie night at The Peterson complete with hamburgers, hot dogs, fries, milk shakes, popcorn and American Graffiti.

The closing banquet included insightful comments from key note speaker Dr. Fred Simeone, Simeone Automotive Foundation, and the highly-anticipated NAAMY Awards presentation by Christine Bobco, National Packard Museum. It was a charming evening of warm conversation, and delicious dining complemented by beautiful floral arrangements, while surround by notable automobiles.

Thank You to Our Supporters

We extend our heartfelt appreciation to our generous sponsors, whose support helped make this conference a great success:

  • Hagerty - The Official Insurance Provider of the National Association of Automobile Museums
  • Group Delphi - Generous sponsors of the NAAM Scholarship Program

2014 NAAMY AWARD WINNERS

Congratulations to our 2014 NAAMY Award Winners!  Each award recognizes industry leaders for achievement, professionalism and creativity. NAAMY Awards are designed to further promote professionalism in automotive museum managerial, curatorial, educational and promotional work.  Entries were judged at Kent State University, Trumbull Campus, Warren, Ohio, by professors with expertise in each field of competition.

Congratulations to the following award winners:

2014 NAAMY Award Winners

Division I

Museums with budgets less than $300,000

Interpretive  Exhibits

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – National Packard Museum

2nd Place – Ford Piquette Avenue Plant

Newsletters and Magazines

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Veit Automotive Foundation
2nd place – Wills Sainte Claire Auto Museum
3rd place – Seal Cove Auto Museum

Website Design

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Seal Cove Auto Museum

Division II

Museums with budgets greater than $300,000

Books and Exhibit Catalogs

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Henry Ford Museum

2nd Place – Reynolds-Alberta Museum

3rd Place – Reynolds-Alberta Museum

Collateral Materials

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – AACA Museum

2nd Place – San Diego Automotive Museum

3rd Place – Auburn Cord Duesenberg Museum

Educational Programs

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – LeMay – America’s Car Museum

2nd Place – National Automobile Museum (The Harrah Collection)

3rd Place – National Corvette Museum

Events and Public Promotions

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – AACA Museum

2nd Place – National Corvette Museum

Interpretive Exhibits

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – AACA Museum & Reynolds-Alberta Museum

2nd Place – National Automobile Museum (The Harrah Collection)

3rd Place – San Diego Automotive Museum

Newsletters and Magazines

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – National Automobile Museum (The Harrah Collection)

2nd Place – National Corvette Museum & LeMay – America’s Car Museum

3rd Place – AACA Museum

Website Design

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – National Automobile Museum (The Harrah Collection)

2nd Place – Auburn Cord Duesenberg Museum

3rd Place – AACA Museum

2014 CONFERENCE SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

Congratulations to four NAAM members who received scholarships to attend the 2014 Annual Conference.  Awards included $1,000 for travel expenses, plus complimentary conference registration.  These valuable scholarships were made possible thanks to a generous sponsorship from Group Delphi (specialists in museum exhibits), combined with a contribution from NAAM.

NAAM is dedicated to helping its members grow professionally through informative annual conferences and networking opportunities. To fulfill this goal, NAAM offers conference scholarships each year. The scholarship program is designed for museums with limited financial resources to pay for their staff to attend.

Congratulations to our 2014 recipients:

Raney Bench, Director, Seal Cove Museum
Nancy Darga, Executive Director, Ford Piquette Avenue Plant
Robert Jeffrey, Executive Director, Northeast Classic Car Museum
Katrina O'Brien, Archives & Collection Manager, World of Speed

CURATIONAL NEWS

A Simple Deaccession

By Drew Van De Wielle
Curator of Collections
Studebaker National Museum

In early 2013, the Studebaker National Museum deaccessioned a 1965 Studebaker Wagonaire. It was not suitable for display, and it was not cost-effective to restore the vehicle to those standards. It appeared to have been painted with a broom over about 50 pounds of Bondo. Another factor that complicated the situation was that although the donor form was complete and proper, the title was never signed and transferred. The donor, the wife of a former Studebaker executive and her husband had long since left this earth. This began the opportunity for me to play detective.

Information on the husband was easy to locate in the St. Joseph County Public Records office. Unfortunately, the state required both donors’ death certificates, and the wife moved out of the county immediately following her husband’s passing.  Having one death certificate in hand I ask myself, “Where do I go from here?” Fortunately, Larry Page and Sergey Brin founded Google some years back to assist in situations similar to mine. Through a lot of research I was finally able to track down the late wife in Madison County, Ind.  A quick phone call and a couple dollars later, the death certificate was in the mail.

Upon the certificate’s arrival, I hurried down to the Bureau of Motor Vehicles with the title, both death certificates and the original donor form. A few weeks later, the title arrived bearing the name Studebaker National Museum. I learned a lot from this situation, most importantly how to prevent things like this from happening in the first place. I ask all of you reading this to please make sure all steps in the donation process are followed to the “T” for the sake of tomorrow’s curators.


RETAIL OPPORTUNITIES

Custom Products Manufacturing and Museum Store Products
Custom Products Manufacturing and Museum Store Products of New Jersey (USA) have been working with museums, gift shops and cultural sites for over 25 years creating magnets, note cards, notepads, bookmarks, puzzles, coasters, key chains and much more. They specialize in custom product development and have just been voted the 2014 Vendor of the Year at this year’s Museum Store Association show.

Please visit their website to view available products that they can create with any of your images with no set-up fee. There are low minimums using your images over a wide range of products to create a story of your venue. Email any product questions you may have.  They can also send a wholesale price list if you wish. Catalogs and samples available on request. museumstoreproducts.com.
Contact:  Marty Gutowski, marty@museumstoreproducts.com

 

AUTO BIOGRAPHY by Earl Swift, $26.99

Tommy Arney has biceps as big as most men’s thighs, knuckles roughened by wrench-turning and blunt-force trauma, some self-applied tattoos and more than a few scars. A grade-school dropout, he’s the owner of Moyock Muscle: a glorified junkyard, where four-hundred old cars litter five scrubby acres in eastern North Carolina. For Tommy, these cars aren’t just scraps waiting to be dismantled for cash. They’re archeological artifacts, fossils of the twentieth-century American experience, of a place and a people utterly devoted to the automobile and changed by it in uncountable ways.

To him, they’re history. But to his town, they’re trash. And so when he acquires a classic ‘57 Chevy in terrible shape and promises to return it to its full glory, he starts on a journey that could restore his financial solvency and respect in his community, as well as save his business from the town officials and creditors who seek to destroy him.

In tracing the ownership of the Chevy from its original owner down to Tommy, Earl Swift’s multifaceted story charts the fortunes of middle-class American experience from the mid-fifties to the present. Swift will intersperse his progressive biography of the iconic Chevy, with an in-depth exploration of its thirteenth-and final-owner, Tommy Arney, a man who himself was written off as unsalvageable.

Written for motor heads and automotive novices alike, AUTO BIOGRAPHY is the story of the decline and rebirth of the American Dream, drawn through the evolution of our most iconic automobile and the improbable heroism of its last owner.

More information here.   Contact: Emily Homonoff, emily.homonoff@harpercollins.com

WHERE THEY RACED: Speed Demons in the City of Angels 

The Award winning film “WHERE THEY RACED: Speed Demons in the City of Angels” is now available on DVD. This documentary tells the story of the amazing automotive innovation and racing history that helped put Southern California on the map. With hundreds of vintage photos, rare archival footage and revealing interviews “WHERE THEY RACED” reunited the ghost tracks of Los Angeles with the cars that raced on them to give these fading memories a final victory lap. Please contact Harry Pallenberg for wholesale prices, email: info@wheretheyraced.com, phone: (213) 810-2376

DONATION OFFER – 1948 PLYMOUTH

Vanya Scott from National Law Enforcement Museum in Washington, D.C. has presented a unique opportunity to NAAM member museums. NLEM recently deaccesioned 1948 Plymouth P15 and is offering to donate it, at no charge. The accepting museum would simply have to accept bearing the cost of transporting the Plymouth from their facility in Forestville, Md. This auto was lovingly restored and has been kept in protected museum storage since the NLEM acquired it in 2006. See the attached informational sheet about the automobile and its provenance. For more information, please contact: Vanya Scott, Registrar, National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund National Law Enforcement Museum, (202)737-7869 (DC office), (202)737-3405 (Fax), (301) 420-8394  (Offsite)

EXHIBITION OFFER

Hans Laurell has offered his unique collection of car cemetery photographs to NAAM member museums for use in an exhibit. These photographs were taken by Hans in a listed and protected car cemetery deep in the forest in Sweden. Several hundred old wrecks were stored there from the 1940s through the late 1960s by two brothers who are no longer among us.  It is a rather unique collection in that the photos show the beauty of mother nature’s reclaim of man’s dear possessions.

Hans’ pictures are not meant to be of a documentary kind, but rather something beautiful even though they depict the slow degradation process. The collection consists of approximately 50 pieces, and the photographs have been displayed in several art exhibitions in Sweden.  Please contact Hans Laurell by email at hans.laurell@tele2.se.
NEWS FROM MEMBER MUSEUMS [NEXT SECTION]

Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles – Boyertown, Penn.

The Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles opened its newest exhibit, Woodrow Wilson, President Electric: Harnessing the Power of Innovation in the Progressive Era on April 10, 2014.  This award-winning exhibit, which is on loan from the Woodrow Wilson House Museum in Washington, D.C., explores the technological advancements made during President Wilson’s administration from 1913 through 1921.  Featured in the exhibit will be the Boyertown Museum’s own 1921 Milburn Light Electric Opera Coupe, which is similar to the Milburn electrics President Wilson’s Secret Service men drove.  This exhibition was supported in part by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and will be on display at the Boyertown Museum until September 30, 2014.

Swope’s Cars of Yesteryear Museum – Elizabethtown, Ky.

Swope’s Cars of Yesteryear Museum of Elizabethtown, Ky. is celebrating its 15th anniversary by featuring “orphan” cars of the early days of the automobile.  These will include a 1910 Brush, Model T and Model A Fords, Packards, Pierce Arrows, LaSalles, a Hupmobile, a Chandler and others. These are cars that bring back pleasant memories.  The museum contains a total of 64 magnificent machines of the past, all original or professionally restored to original condition. The museum is free and all are welcome to come and enjoy.  Open from Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., there is always a knowledgeable hostess there to greet you, answer questions or give a tour.   TripAdvisor gives the Museum a five star rating and has dubbed the Museum as a “must see attraction.”  For a virtual tour, please visit www.swopemuseum.com.

 

 

The Antique Automobile Club of America – Hershey, Penn.


The Antique Automobile Club of America (AACA) Museum proudly announces its newest exhibit, Indian Nation: The Indian Motorcycle and America. This captivating exhibit includes more than 22 Motorcycles and continues to roar on through October 24, 2014.

The stunning selection of rare and show-winning motorcycles on display will showcase early singles and twins, Scouts, Chiefs, and Fours. Some of the exhibit’s highlights include Harrisburg-area racer Bob Markey’s original 1940 Scout, a 1903 Indian –

possibly the earliest original example of the marque – and immaculately restored machines of all eras. Included within the exhibit will be period dealer items and popular culture references.

Please join the AACA Museum this year in enjoying a celebration of some of the most beautiful and meaningful cultural objects created by America, in one of the world’s premier motor museums. This exhibit celebrates and commemorates Indian’s exciting re-entry into the marketplace this year.

Fountainhead Antique Auto Museum – Fairbanks, Alaska

Beginning June 1, 2014, the Fountainhead Antique Auto Museum will showcase a new exhibit called Extreme Motoring: Alaska’s First Automobiles and Their Dauntless Drivers. The museum has assembled a collection of original Alaska automobiles for the exhibit as well as several extremely rare cars identical to the first to arrive in the territory. Among these are Alaska’s very first automobile (built by a young man who had never seen one before) and an unusual Fordson Snow Motor.

The exhibit will also tell the stories of Alaska’s first motorists and the challenges they faced before there were any highways, bridges or snow plows in the area. The extreme cold, deplorable road conditions and an absence of repair shops required a high level of ingenuity and resourcefulness by these bold men. Their inventions and adventures will be illustrated through displays, historic videos and an extensive photograph collection shown throughout the museum’s galleries. For more information, please visit www.fountainheadmuseum.com

February 2014

February 15, 2014 in Newsletter

President's Message

Jacky Frady

Dear Member,

On behalf of the NAAM Board of Directors, I would like to wish all of you a successful and rewarding 2014, both professionally and personally.

Our Board had a very successful Strategic Planning meeting at The Henry Ford in November 2013. We spent two days under the direction of an exceptional facilitator, Jim Van Bochove, The Henry Ford’s director of workforce development.

In addition to reviewing the results of our Member Interest Survey, there were many exercises that led to a thorough examination of NAAM. These included, among others, conducting a SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats); drafting an identity statement that captures the essence of what NAAM is; identifying what big questions face our organization, and determining the value-based criteria that will guide our future strategic decisions. This culminated in a revision of our Mission Statement and the development of goals and objectives, along with assignments and timeframes.

The following new Mission Statement has been added to the NAAM Website, along with our list of goals.

Jackie Frady

2014 Annual Conference

Early Bird Registration Deadline: February 17, 2014

Good News. The early bird conference registration fee for NAAM members is $400, reduced from $500 reported earlier. This reduction was made possible by a contribution from NAAM to help support our members. Also, we are extremely grateful for another generous sponsorship from Hagerty, The Official Insurance Provider of the National Association of Automobile Museums.

When and Where: The 2014 Annual conference will be held jointly between NAAM and the World Forum for Motor Museums at the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, California, March 24 - 28, 2014. The conference starts on Monday, the 24th, with a Welcome Reception from 5 – 6:30 p.m. and concludes on Friday night, the 28th, with the closing banquet and NAAMY Awards Ceremony. Please note the dates are the 24th – 28th (early notices stated the 25th – 29th). The conference is packed with excellent sessions and remarkable tours. It will be a great professional development and networking opportunity. Please see the attached conference brochure and registration form

[Read More]

Conference Hotel Room Blocks Available

Deadline: January 21, 2014

Make Reservations ASAP: Hotel Room Blocks are now ready for reservations at the following hotels for the 2014 NAAM and World Forum Conference. Room blocks at each of the hotels expire on January 21, 2014, after which they will still honor the preferred rate, but cannot guarantee availability.

[Read More]

ENter The 2014 NAAMY Awards Competition

Deadline: January 31, 2014

It's time to start compiling your entries for the NAAMY Awards Competition. The deadline is January 31, 2014, so there is plenty of time to get your “winning” entries in the mail. The process is simple, plus you can enter as many categories as you like and you many submit more than one entry in a category. Please see the attached NAAMY Awards Call for Entries brochure or access the brochure on the NAAM website (www.naam.museum) under “About NAAM.”

[Read More]

Apply For A 2014 Conference Scholarship

Deadline: February 7, 2014 - View Brochure

Apply Now: Each year NAAM offers scholarships to the Annual Conference to help members grow professionally through informative sessions and networking opportunities. The scholarship program is designed for museums with limited financial resources (annual budgets less than $500,000) to pay for their staff to attend the conference.

When: You can apply anytime and we encourage you to do so to take advantage of this great benefit. The deadline is February 7, 2014.

How: Please visit the NAAM website for scholarship criteria, guidelines and the online application (www.naam.museum, select Conferences, then Conference Scholarships.)

Have You Checked The Forum?

Have you checked the NAAM Forum? It is an invaluable source of information. Is it time to write or update your museum’s Emergency Policy? If so, you can go to the Forum and review the Gilmore Car Museum’s Emergency Policy for helpful ideas. Would you like to use NAAM’s Collections Policy to revise your policies? It’s also readily available to you on the Forum. Are you looking for a roommate for the annual conference to reduce expenses? Just check the Forum. In addition, you can ask for advice from other museums about a particular subject. You can also answer questions posted by others and share your knowledge. Forum categories include Administration, Curatorial, NAAM Annual Conference, Marketing, Education Programs, Exhibits, Museum Store, Volunteers, Fundraising and Conservation.

Curatorial News

By Derek E. Moore, Frederick C. and Kathleen S. Crawford Curator of Transportation History, Western Reserve Historical Society

A Century of the Automobile Assembly Line

Do people only come to automobile museums to see automobiles? Not necessarily. It is important to consider the wide variety of museum visitors, like those with an interest in exploring the deeper story behind the automobile industry, its struggles and successes, its impact on society and culture, and the changing face of the industry. We must present and interpret these stories using more than just an automobile. This is where our collections of small artifacts come into play in exhibit development.

[Read More]

Marketing News

By Kendar Klink, Operations Director, Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum

A Century of the Automobile Assembly Line

Many non-profit organizations shy away from creating a marketing plan each year because it may seem too sales-centric or too focused on money rather than mission focused. But marketing, especially content marketing, is a tool that each non-profit must use. Marketing is a way to convince someone to visit your museum, attend your event, or purchase from your museum’s gift store.

[Read More]

News From Member Museums

Let us know what’s happening at your museum. Email Kristy Ketterman at kristy.ketterman@gmail.com with your latest news.

Gilmore Car Museum – Hickory Corners, Mich.

The Gilmore Car Museum, located just northeast of Kalamazoo, Mich. in Hickory Corners, has announced the “Gilmore Promise”. Effective immediately, the Museum—considered “America Signature Collection”— has introduced free admission for all K-12 school groups, special discounted family rates, and an extension of their Youth admission rate to include those up to 17 years of age. Inclusive by design, the “Gilmore Promise” represents the Gilmore Car Museum’s commitment to making learning exciting and accessible to everyone in the community, giving families and educators alike the ability to experience and visit the Museum, when they may not have had the means to before.

National Corvette Museum – Bowling Green, Ky.

Get lost in the GPS Adventures Maze and learn how to find your way using GPS! Running from January 13, 2014 through May 4, 2014, the National Corvette Museum presents their “GPS Adventures” exhibit, an interactive look into traditional and modern navigation. Kids and their families can explore the ways that GPS is used, find out where the technology is heading in the future, and discover geocaching, a family-friendly treasure hunting game in the great outdoors. The Museum is open daily, 8am-5pm CST and the exhibit is included with regular Museum admission. $10 adults, $5 kids age 6-16, student and group rates available. Info: 270-781-7973, www.corvettemuseum.org/exhibits/gps.shtml

Seal Cove Auto Museum – Seal Cove, Maine

On December 12, 2013, the Seal Cove Auto Museum participated in a Downton Abbey themed event in Portland, Maine for Maine Public Broadcasting Network donors. The Glasers, pictured, dressed according to theme and showed a 1928 Rolls-Royce Twenty Boat Tail, the company’s “small car” for the 1920s. Only the chassis and mechanical parts were actually made by Rolls-Royce; the body was made and fitted by a coachbuilder selected by the owner.

by admin

NAAM E-News – October 2013, Volume 14, Issue 3

January 10, 2014 in Newsletter

In This Issue

President's Message

By Jacky Frady

For museums that operate on a calendar year, you are putting finishing touches on your budget, business plan, exhibit and program calendars, and identifying objectives and developing tactics to meet your goals.

Please include NAAM in your goal setting, for example:

  1. Attend the 2014 Conference.
  2. Enter several projects in the NAAMY Awards Competition.
  3. Apply for a conference scholarship.
  4. Participate regularly in the forum on the NAAM website.
  5. Become more involved in NAAM through a committee or leadership position.

Next step, identify the tactics to accomplish your goals:

  1. Budget conference expenses, schedule your calendar to attend the conference (see the conference article for dates and fees), and develop a work plan to accommodate this time away from your museum.
  2. Select the NAAMY Award categories to enter, outline entry steps and needs, set completion dates, and outline a plan to promote the awards you win.
  3. Watch for scholarship announcements, thoughtfully complete the application, and mark your calendar to submit it before the deadline (to be determined).
  4. Set reminders in your outlook calendar to check the forum on a regular basis and participate.
  5. Schedule dates to explore opportunities to increase involvement, reach out to NAAM committee chairs and Board members (see www.naam.museum for contact info), and share your ideas.

Just like you, goal setting is a primary goal of the NAAM Board of Directors at this time. We sincerely thank our 36 members who participated in the Member Interest Survey and sharied information to help make NAAM better. In preparation of our Strategic Planning Meeting that is quickly approaching, we are reviewing survey results, our current Strategic Plan, our progress with this plan, and current committee projects and goals. We look forward to developing a new Strategic Plan that will guide our efforts and ensure NAAM remains relevant and meaningful to our members.

As always, please feel free to share your thoughts and ideas with me. I welcome and appreciate your input.

2014 Annual Conference

NAAM and the World Forum

Be sure to mark your calendars for the joint 2014 Conference with NAAM and the World Forum for Motor Museums, which will be held at the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, California, from March 25 through 29, 2014.

The theme will be “Attracting New Audiences” and there will be three days of sessions with topics ranging in scope from vehicle conservation and preservation to media relations and reaching non-auto enthusiast visitors. In addition, two days of field trips will take us up the Pacific Coast Highway and along the streets and boulevards that once made up the beginning of historic Route 66.

We are now in the process of finalizing the seminars that will make our gathering both timely and relevant so please contact Leslie Kendall at the Petersen Automotive Museum (lkendall@petersen.org) if you would like to submit a last-minute idea for a paper, presentation, or panel discussion.

The registration fee will be $500 for delegates and $350 for delegates’ guests who will join us at the dinners, receptions, and tours, but not the sessions. This fee will cover the cost of select meals, conference materials and handouts, daily shuttles to and from hotels, offsite tour transportation, and access to the Petersen Museum hospitality suite.

Because it will be a “joint” conference, participants from both the World Forum and NAAM will attend all of the same events at the same time. This will allow for maximum interaction among the delegates and provide a rare opportunity to liaison with your colleagues from around the world without having to leave the country! On-line registration will be available soon so watch for periodic updates.

We hope to see everyone in California next March and will keep you informed as our plans for this landmark event continue to unfold.

2014 NAAMY Awards Competition

As 2013 starts coming to a close, this is a good time to start planning your entries for our upcoming competition. The NAAMY Awards brochure and entry form are not out yet, but you can review last’s year information on the NAAM website, www.naam.museum. Select the categories you want to enter, gather support materials as outlined in the guidelines, and begin drafting points pertinent to your entry narrative. A NAAMY Awards offer many benefits from offering the incentives to improve your programs to illustrating the excellent work your museum is producing.

Website Forum

What Forum? Hopefully, that’s not what you said when you looked at the title of this article. It’s the forum on the NAAM website. Check it daily, answer questions posed by your NAAM colleagues, offer your advice, and use it as a resource tool to help you with your job. If you do that, the forum will become one of NAAM’s most important benefits. Please make the forum part of your daily routine, perhaps, right after checking emails. Terry Ernest, the NAAM Board member who managed the development of our new website and forum, knows the benefit of association forums.

Terry Ernest joined a business association to receive benefits of mass buying for his retail business. He was looking for a cost savings, but what he found was remarkable asset – a forum. Here he could ask questions and receive input from experts in his field. There were multiple answers that offered difference perspectives. These opinions contributed significantly to the success of his business.

If you feel like you are faced with too much work, too few resources and you are wearing too many hats, then your time is precious and obviously very limited. With the forum, you can find helpful information by simply setting at your desk and using your keyboard. What an effective way to broaden your resources. Give it a try.

As Terry has said, “This is where the power of your membership will be realized. But to make it work, we all must be involved. Please go to our new website, www.naam.museum, and log into the forum area. Don’t be afraid to ask questions or provide your answer to someone else’s questions. To get the greatest value from your NAAM membership, log into the forum and contribute every day!”

Did you forget your login information? If so, contact Lisa Panko at lpanko@automuseum.org.

Curatorial News

A Century of the Automobile Assembly Line

By Matt Anderson
Curator of Transportation
The Henry Ford

It’s been a busy year at The Henry Ford. Not only are we commemorating the 150th anniversary of our namesake's birth (Ford was born on July 30, 1863), we're also marking the centennial of Ford Motor Company's seminal Highland Park assembly line. Over much of 1913 and into the early months of 1914, Henry Ford and his associates combined the standardization of interchangeable parts with the subdivision of labor and the fluidity of work moving to workers. What they discovered in the process was the key to production figures previously unimaginable, and a force that continues to drive global industry today.

Fittingly, the Ford assembly line had its “spark” in the Model T's magneto generator. Somewhere around April 1, 1913, flywheel magnetos were placed on moving lines in the Highland Park plant. Instead of one worker completing one flywheel in some 20 minutes, a group of workers stood along a waist-high platform. Each worker assembled some small piece of the flywheel and then slid it along to the next person. One whole flywheel came off the line every 13 minutes. With further tweaking, the assembly line produced a finished flywheel magneto in just five minutes.

We can only imagine the excitement that came with this “eureka” moment. Ford soon adapted the assembly line to engines, and then transmissions, and, in August 1913, to complete chassis. The crude “slide” method was replaced with chain-driven delivery systems that not only reduced handling but also regulated work speed. By early 1914, the various separate production lines had fused into three continuous lines able to churn out a finished Model T every 93 minutes – an extraordinary improvement over the 12½ hours per car under the old stationary assembly methods.

There’s no greater measure of the assembly line’s efficiencies than the result it had on the Model T’s price. While the car was a good value when introduced in 1908 for $850, by the early 1920s Ford was able to drop the price to a mere $260 for a two-seat runabout. Lower prices increased demand, and the resulting feedback loop yielded 15 million cars built and sold by the time Model T production ended in 1927.
The assembly line’s anniversary is a reminder that automobile museums preserve much more than automobiles. We are also the custodians of significant social and technological concepts that, despite their tremendous influence, cannot be fully shared through physical objects alone. While a finished Model T, an industrial milling machine, or an employee badge might tell parts of the assembly line’s story, it is up to us as curators, directors and collections managers to preserve and interpret the whole. So long as we do, the automobile’s larger influence on American life and progress will remain relevant to changing audiences. One hundred years later, the assembly line remains a powerful industrial force. It is our task to share the origins and inspiration that brought that force to light a century ago.

News from Member Museums

 National Corvette Museum – Bowling Green, Ky.

motor cycle exhibit

Corvettes may be the best thing on four wheels, but what about our two-wheel friends? Running from September 21 through January 3, the National Corvette Museum presents “Two-Wheel Speed,” a unique exhibit featuring over 40 amazing motorcycles of various makes, models and eras. The bikes on display range from the classic American Harley to foreign bikes such as Kawasakis and Yamahas.

Learn more about this exhibit, running through January 3, online here: http://www.corvettemuseum.org/exhibits/motorcycle.shtml

Studebaker Museum – South Bend, Ind.

Capehart Jukebox

The Studebaker National Museum has opened a special Exhibit about Notre Dame’s most famous coach, Knute Rockne, and his connection as celebrity sales representative for the Studebaker Corporation.  Mr. Rockne was perhaps the first superstar ever associated with the Notre Dame football team. This exhibit will run through December 1, 2013 and will examine the relationships between Studebaker, Knute Rockne and the University of Notre Dame from 1928 until Rockne’s untimely death in 1931.

In addition to their new Knute Rockne exhibit, the Museum has recently received a new addition to their glamorous galleries. A 1930 Capehart Amperion 110 Jukebox (with radio) now resides in the Museum with cars from its era on its first-floor gallery.

This Capehart Amperion 110 utilizes a mechanism that changes and flips 78 rpm records automatically. Capehart’s unique design allowed for the user to listen to hours of music without having to change the record player manually each time it finished a record. This player was the absolute ultimate experience for music lovers, at that time.

World of Speed Museum – Portland, Ore.

World of Speed, a new experiential motorsports exposition being developed in the Portland, Ore. area has retained the services of renowned local designer, Eric Black. A Portland native, Eric is a trained architect, but makes his living designing automobiles for clients such as Freightliner and TV personality, Jesse James. He is currently working on vehicles for a major movie project.

“World of Speed will be a new type of experience,” said Executive Director Tony Thacker. “Eric is the perfect guy to oversee its design. We felt that Eric’s blend of an architectural background coupled with his obvious passion for automobiles would enable him to bring a unique perspective to World of Speed” continued Thacker. “It’s not often that one finds a designer with such diverse experience that can talk the hot rod language. We’re very excited to have him on board.”
Anticipated to open in 2014, World of Speed will be a new type of automotive experience that combines the excitement and passion of historic racecars with education.

Murphy Auto Museum – Oxnard, Calif.

Murphy
From October through December, the Murphy Auto Museum in Oxnard, Calif. will feature a display of the Chevrolet Corvette, America’s Sports car. The exhibit will feature various models including a 1960, 1964, 1966, 1069 and a 1986. Many pieces of Corvette memorabilia will also be on display.

In addition to their new Corvette exhibit, the Museum will also have a display of Brewster Moseley “Auto Portraits from the Past.” For up to date information on what’s happening at the Murphy Auto Museum, please visit them on Facebook at:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Murphy-Auto-Museum/172995117690

Wheels O' Time Museum – Dunlap, Ill.

World museum fall festival

The Wheels O’ Time Museum in Dunlap, Ill., had an excellent summer season with a significant increase of visitors, capped off by a successful Fall Festival event in October. In early spring, the new workshop and display building was completed, making room for a large workshop as well as a display area for a new partner of the Museum, the local Early Ford V-8 Club. The building was the pet project of the Museum’s Vice President, Jack Seamon, who passed away in February.

The main project in the new facility is the restoration of the Peoria Fire Department’s 1931 Ahrens Fox Fire Pumper, with the aid of the Heart of Illinois Fire Enthusiasts and Collectors, also a new partner club. A recent exhibit in the Ford section was a 1927 Ford Touring from Bradford, Ill., in which six young women toured the country for six years prior to World War II. They named the car the “Silver Streak” and themselves the “Gypsy Coeds.” This group of ladies was even lucky enough to meet and have lunch with Henry Ford himself.

On October 5, the Wheels O’ Time Museum held their annual Fall Festival event. The festival brought out a large crowd who all came to see antique and modern fire trucks, a blacksmith shop, working mini steam engines, music, food and more. Shown is a beautiful 1925 Chevrolet Fire Truck restored by one of our volunteers, at the Festival.

The museum will close for the season on November 1.

November 2013

November 15, 2013 in Newsletter

President's Message

Jacky Frady

Dear Member,

For museums that operate on a calendar year, you are putting finishing touches on your budget, business plan, exhibit and program calendars, and identifying objectives and developing tactics to meet your goals.

Please include NAAM in your goal setting, for example:

  1. Attend the 2014 Conference.
  2. Enter several projects in the NAAMY Awards Competition.
  3. Apply for a conference scholarship.
  4. Participate regularly in the forum on the NAAM website.
  5. Become more involved in NAAM through a committee or leadership position.

Next step, identify the tactics to accomplish your goals:

  1. Budget conference expenses, schedule your calendar to attend the conference (see the conference article for dates and fees), and develop a work plan to accommodate this time away from your museum.
  2. Select the NAAMY Award categories to enter, outline entry steps and needs, set completion dates, and outline a plan to promote the awards you win.
  3. Watch for scholarship announcements, thoughtfully complete the application, and mark your calendar to submit it before the deadline (to be determined).
  4. Set reminders in your outlook calendar to check the forum on a regular basis and participate.
  5. Schedule dates to explore opportunities to increase involvement, reach out to NAAM committee chairs and Board members (see www.naam.museum for contact info), and share your ideas.

Just like you, goal setting is a primary goal of the NAAM Board of Directors at this time. We sincerely thank our 36 members who participated in the Member Interest Survey and sharied information to help make NAAM better. In preparation of our Strategic Planning Meeting that is quickly approaching, we are reviewing survey results, our current Strategic Plan, our progress with this plan, and current committee projects and goals. We look forward to developing a new Strategic Plan that will guide our efforts and ensure NAAM remains relevant and meaningful to our members.

As always, please feel free to share your thoughts and ideas with me. I welcome and appreciate your input.

Jackie Frady

2014 Annual Conference

NAAM and the World Forum

Be sure to mark your calendars for the joint 2014 Conference with NAAM and the World Forum for Motor Museums, which will be held at the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, California, from March 25 through 29, 2014.

The theme will be “Attracting New Audiences” and there will be three days of sessions with topics ranging in scope from vehicle conservation and preservation to media relations and reaching non-auto enthusiast visitors. In addition, two days of field trips will take us up the Pacific Coast Highway and along the streets and boulevards that once made up the beginning of historic Route 66.

[Read More]

2014 NAMMY Awards Competition

This is the perfect time to make a commitment for your museum to enter the NAAMY Awards Competition in 2014. You can report your successes or you can present tangible proof that your museum has excelled within the automobile museum industry. A NAAMY Award offers many benefits.

[Read More]

Website Forum

What Forum? Hopefully, that’s not what you said when you looked at the title of this article. It’s the forum on the NAAM website. Check it daily, answer questions posed by your NAAM colleagues, offer your advice, and use it as a resource tool to help you with your job. If you do that, the forum will become one of NAAM’s most important benefits. Please make the forum part of your daily routine, perhaps, right after checking emails. Terry Ernest, the NAAM Board member who managed the development of our new website and forum, knows the benefit of association forums.

[Read More]

Curatorial News

By Matt Anderson, Curator of Transportation, The Henry Ford

A Century of the Automobile Assembly Line

It’s been a busy year at The Henry Ford. Not only are we commemorating the 150th anniversary of our namesake's birth (Ford was born on July 30, 1863), we're also marking the centennial of Ford Motor Company's seminal Highland Park assembly line. Over much of 1913 and into the early months of 1914, Henry Ford and his associates combined the standardization of interchangeable parts with the subdivision of labor and the fluidity of work moving to workers. What they discovered in the process was the key to production figures previously unimaginable, and a force that continues to drive global industry today.

[Read More]

News From Member Museums

Let us know what’s happening at your museum. Email Kristy Ketterman at kristy.ketterman@gmail.com with your latest news.

National Corvette Museum – Bowling Green, Ky.

 

 

Corvettes may be the best thing on four wheels, but what about our two-wheel friends? Running from September 21 through January 3, the National Corvette Museum presents “Two-Wheel Speed,” a unique exhibit featuring over 40 amazing motorcycles of various makes, models and eras. The bikes on display range from the classic American Harley to foreign bikes such as Kawasakis and Yamahas.

Learn more about this exhibit, running through January 3,
online here: www.corvettemuseum.org/exhibits/motorcycle.shtml

Studebaker Museum – South Bend, Ind.

 

 

The Studebaker National Museum has opened a special Exhibit about Notre Dame’s most famous coach, Knute Rockne, and his connection as celebrity sales representative for the Studebaker Corporation. Mr. Rockne was perhaps the first superstar ever associated with the Notre Dame football team. This exhibit will run through December 1, 2013 and will examine the relationships between Studebaker, Knute Rockne and the University of Notre Dame from 1928 until Rockne’s untimely death in 1931.

[Read More]

World of Speed – Wilsonville, Ore.

World of Speed, a new experiential motorsports exposition being developed in the Portland, Ore. area has retained the services of renowned local designer, Eric Black. A Portland native, Eric is a trained architect, but makes his living designing automobiles for clients such as Freightliner and TV personality, Jesse James. He is currently working on vehicles for a major movie project.

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Murphy Auto Museum – Oxnard, Calif.

 

 

From October through December, the Murphy Auto Museum in Oxnard, Calif. will feature a display of the Chevrolet Corvette, America’s Sports car. The exhibit will feature various models including a 1960, 1964, 1966, 1069 and a 1986. Many pieces of Corvette memorabilia will also be on display.

In addition to their new Corvette exhibit, the Museum will also have a display of Brewster Moseley “Auto Portraits from the Past.” For up to date information on what’s happening at the Murphy Auto Museum, please visit them on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Murphy-Auto-Museum/172995117690

Wheels O' Time Museum – Dunlap, Ill.

 

 

The Wheels O’ Time Museum in Dunlap, Ill., had an excellent summer season with a significant increase of visitors, capped off by a successful Fall Festival event in October. In early spring, the new workshop and display building was completed, making room for a large workshop as well as a display area for a new partner of the Museum, the local Early Ford V-8 Club. The building was the pet project of the Museum’s Vice President, Jack Seamon, who passed away in February.

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August 2013

August 15, 2013 in Newsletter

President's Message

Jacky Frady

Dear Member,

It was wonderful getting together with so many NAAM members at the annual conference. The Smith Family Museum of American Speed did an exceptional job presenting an informative and memorable experience that made our gathering even more meaningful.

I look forward to serving as president of NAAM for one more year, especially communicating with you throughout the year and working with our excellent Board of Directors. Each Board member makes valuable contributions and is committed to the success of NAAM. I am sure many organizations would be envious of this dynamic.

Strategic Planning

The Board has an aggressive list of goals to accomplish before our next conference in March 2014. Most important is a two-day strategic planning meeting to set direction for NAAM, which is tentatively scheduled in November 2013. Our last session was held in January 2010, and the majority of the goals have been implemented, with a few tested and revised.

I Want to Hear From You

Your input is important in this process and I would appreciate hearing from you. Please send me an email and share your thoughts about the following:

What are the most important services NAAM offers?

What other services would you like NAAM to offer?

NAAM E-News

I apologize for the delay in producing NAAM E-News this year. There has been a challenge with hosting it on the new website. As a result, this edition represents Issues 1 and 2 in 2013 and covers more topics than usual.

Happy reading and I hope you have had a busy, productive and enjoyable summer.

Jackie Frady

2013 Annual Conference

“Speedy” Bill Smith shared highlights of his career of racing and selling speed and power equipment spanning more the 60 years with NAAM conference attendees at the Museum of American Speed, which he and his wife Joyce founded in Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1992. The Smith Family were generous and gracious hosts of the 2013 annual conference.

NAAM conference participants at the Strategic Air & Space Museum in Ashland, Nebraska, on Thursday, March 21, 2013.

The Smith Family Museum of American Speed presented an exceptional conference in Lincoln, Nebraska, March 19 – 22, 2013. Automobile museums large and small were represented including Puerto Rico and 22 states reaching all four corners of the U.S. About 65 people registered for the conference where networking and educational opportunities were abundant. Twelve informative sessions were offered, 27 NAAMY Awards were presented, 41 professional development certificates were issues, two scholarships were awarded, three remarkable collections were toured and much more was experienced.

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2013 Naamy Award Winners

Charlie Ohlin, director of operations of the National Packard Museum, accepts a First Place NAAMY Award of Excellence in Interpretive Exhibits from NAAM President Jackie Frady.

At the 2013 Annual Conference, 27 NAAMY awards were presented to automobile museums across the country in recognition of exceptional work. This year entries were judged at Kent State University, Trumbull Campus, Warren, Ohio, by professors with expertise in each field of competition.

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2013 Conference Scholarship Recipients

NAAM was pleased to award scholarships to two members to enable them to attend the 2013 Annual Conference. The scholarship program is designed for smaller museums with limited resources for professional development of staff. Each year NAAM offers up to three scholarships which include a complimentary conference registration and up to $500 for hotel accommodations (at the host hotel) and travel expenses.

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Enter 2014 Nammy Award Competition

This is the perfect time to make a commitment for your museum to enter the NAAMY Awards Competition in 2014. You can report your successes or you can present tangible proof that your museum has excelled within the automobile museum industry. A NAAMY Award offers many benefits.

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Website Forum

When do you check the new forum for NAAM members? Hopefully it’s every day, Monday through Friday. Be sure to make the forum a regular part of your business routine, as the forum may become your most valued NAAM benefit. Terry Ernest, the NAAM Board member who managed the development of our new website and forum offers the following:

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Reciprocal Admission Program

NAAM has developed a Reciprocal Admission Program to promote professional development and networking opportunities among member museums. There are 86 museums that are members of NAAM and to date 36 have joined the program. Has your museum signed up?

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Curatorial News

By Aaron Warkentin, Curator, Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum

Making Our Cars Matter: Contextualizing Your Automobile Collection

Be it Greek statues or the Space Shuttle, a museum’s challenge is to tell the story of an artifact within the context of the past while making it relevant to the modern visitor. It is always a struggle to take an object as complicated as an automobile and explain its importance within history while also relating it to the present and the future. Signage is an important tool we use to communicate this relevance.

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Marketing News

By Kendar Klink, Operations Director, Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum

To Tweet or Not to Tweet

Social media has transformed the way people in any form of business can reach out to customers and guests. It has been proven in countless studies that consumers shop and frequent establishments that they trust. Creating connections and trust with your guests has become easier with social media; however, your social media “friends” can also be let down. Jumping into the wonderful world of Facebook and Twitter can appear to be easy, but plunging in without a plan and without knowledge can be disastrous.

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Retail Opportunity

Sparta Pewter

Sparta Pewter has had great success in the past few months with our new Sublimation Program. We have created art and mugs for the following NAAM members: National Packard Museum, National Automobile Museum (The Harrah Collection), Barber Motorsports and the NAAM Conference in Lincoln Nebraska.

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Document Authentication

If your museum is in need of Document Authentication services, Wendell Strode, executive director of the National Corvette Museum, shared information about the company that authenticated the Honus Wagner baseball card that just sold for a few million dollars.

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News From Member Museums

Let us know what’s happening at your museum. Email Kristy Ketterman at kristy.ketterman@gmail.com with your latest news.

Antique Automobile Club of America, Hershey, P.A.

The Antique Automobile Club of America Museum in Hershey, Pa. is celebrating their 10th Anniversary this year. To commemorate this celebration, the Museum is hosting a unique exhibit titled “Pop Culture & Cars – A Retro Adventure”, as well as a special car show and celebratory event in June. While visiting for these festivities, guests will also be able to enjoy the Museum’s featured motorcycle exhibit – “British Invasion: A Retrospective of British Motorcycles”.

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LeMay Family Collection Foundation – Tacoma, Wash.

On June 2, 2013, the 2nd Annual Lucky Collector Car Auction was held, benefiting the LeMay Family Collection Foundation. Collectors, curators and vehicle enthusiasts of all kinds gathered on the sweeping pastoral grounds of the LeMay Marymount Event Center in Tacoma, Wash., to bid on 100 historic, vintage and classic vehicles, with approximately 80 of those vehicles coming from the world-famous LeMay Family Collection.

Unser Racing Museum – Albuquerque, N.M.

The month of May is an exciting time at the Unser Racing Museum. A new addition has been added, allowing for more Indy cars to be on exhibit as well as dirt champ, sprint, pace and Al’s collection of antique Model A’s. Also, the Museum has been working with state school districts to align a curriculum with engineering, science and technology as they relate to racing. This collaboration has resulted in over 3,500 school children visiting the Museum this spring.

World of Speed – Wilsonville, Ore.

World of Speed, a new type of experiential, educational motorsports exposition has acquired a permanent home for its race and performance car collection and educational activities on I-5, just 15 miles south of Portland in Wilsonville, Ore.

“We've been looking for a home for almost a year,” said Executive Director Tony Thacker. “Finally, we’re excited to announce the purchase of an 80,000 sq. ft. building which is ideal for the motorsports exposition. Also, there’s a huge workshop area which will provide work space as well as space for our proposed educational activities.”

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British Transportation Museum – Dayton, Ohio

On May 18, 2013, the British Transportation Museum hosted their 10th Annual British Car Meet at the Market in Downtown Dayton, Ohio. Created for contemporary British Car enthusiasts, this 100 car event raises funds for the Museum’s building fund. The British Transportation Museum is the operating arm of the Society for the Preservation of British Transportation in America, Inc. An all volunteer non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization, the Society acquired the “Gem City Ice Cream Building,” a location on the national register of historical buildings. Once the funds are raised and renovations are complete, the Museum will host a display area for British Transportation vehicles, an art gallery, a library of parts, repair and maintenance manuals along with books and magazines featuring British Marques and a gift store.

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California Automobile Museum – Sacramento, Calif.

From the glamorous time of the Great Gatsby, flappers, and early Hollywood comes a rare display of lavish autos cultivated by the California Automobile Museum. The Elegance in Motion: Cars of the Golden Age exhibit, running from May 25 through October 13, 2013, features luxurious marques from the Roaring 20s and Art Deco Era highlighting over 20 of the most stunning vehicles ever manufactured.

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Gilmore Car Museum – Hickory Corners, Mich.

The Grand Opening Celebration of the all-new Model A Ford Museum—the world’s largest public museum dedicated to the Model A—took place on Saturday, May 18, 2013, in Hickory Corners, Mich.

The celebration included a ribbon cutting ceremony, with special guests and keynote speakers. Visitors also enjoyed historic lectures, presentations, tours and live music throughout the day.

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Saratoga Automobile Museum, Saratoga Springs, Ny.

BMW’s world-famous Art Cars are rarely seen outside of Fine Art Museums like The Louvre in Paris, The Tate Modern in London and the Guggenheim Museum in New York City. But, in a coup for the region’s automobile enthusiasts and art lovers, the Saratoga Automobile Museum’s newly opened Golub Gallery exhibit “BMW – The Ultimate Driving Machine,” features a spectacular BMW M1 Procar Racer painted by world renowned artist and pop culture figure, Andy Warhol.

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Veit Automotive Foundation – Monticello, Minn.

2013 marks the Veit Automotive Foundation’s 15th Anniversary as one of the nation’s most unique automotive museums. To celebrate this milestone, the Museum is making their facility open to the public. Visitors will be able to view the Museum’s displays of beautifully restored automobiles, motorcycles and gas pumps among many other eye catching items in a rare setting, focusing on a variety of eras. The Museum will also be hosting their Maple Hill 15th Annual Rod Run 2013 event.

Simeon Foundation Automobile Museum, Philadelphia, Pa.

The Simeone Automotive Foundation Museum recently published another compelling book on the theory of preservation of significant automobiles, particularly as they relate to automotive heritage and Museum curation. Titled The Stewardship of Historically Important Automobiles, this multi-authored text book discusses preservation of cars in found good condition, particularly if they are rare and have some landmark value, instead of restoration where history is erased in order to produce cosmetic perfection. The book is available at http://www.simeonemuseum.org.

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Tailfin Automotive Museum – Austell, Ga.

The Tailfin Automotive Museum is pleased to announce that their new website is now live. Visitors can see the Museum’s cars and projects at www.purpledodo.net. The website will continue to expand with additional information, photographs, news and features.

Founded in October 2003, the Tailfin Automotive Museum was established to provide the excitement of seeing these great American machines—rolling works of art that have survived and thrived through the passage of time and the changes in our culture. The goal of the foundation is to expand the Museum into a physical facility in the future, allowing the public to view the automobiles, as well as other historic memorabilia.

City Garage Car Museum - Greeneville, Tenn.

Allen Johnson, a Pro Stock World Champion, was honored along with his race team with a public reception at the City Garage Car Museum in Greeneville, Tenn. on Saturday, June 8, 2013. This day is observed as “Allen Johnson Day” in both Greeneville and Greene County. At the reception, Johnson retired his championship Mopar Dodge to the Museum for display and also signed autographs.

Ford Piquette Avenue Plant – Detroit, Mich.

The Ford Piquette Avenue Plant, known as the “Birthplace of the Model T,” is pleased to announce the appointment of their first Executive Director, Nancy Darga. Since its inception in 2000, the Piquette Plant Project has been developed by the Board of Directors and implemented under the direction of the President through the use of volunteers, paid consultants and professional contractors. As the project progressed, the need for an Executive Director became obvious. Nancy Darga brings the hands-on understanding needed of historic preservation, program development, volunteer management, fundraising and construction project management to this position.

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National Corvette Museum – Bowling Green, Ky.

The National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Ky. is hosting a ground breaking ceremony for their Motorsports Park on Friday, June 28, 2013, at 9:30 a.m. at the future home of the track. The park will be situated on 184.05 acres that the NCM has purchased and had rezoned. The Museum has an option to purchase the adjoining 221 acres that may be used for future park development.

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