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NAAM E-NEWS – February 2017, Volume 19, Issue 1

February 7, 2017 in Newsletter, Uncategorized

NAAM E-NEWS – February 2017, Volume 19, Issue 1

In This Issue

President’s Message

By: MaryAnn Porinchak

Greetings NAAM Members.

It’s a new year! I hope all of you had a wonderful holiday and ended the year with great expectations and new enthusiasm for the days ahead. I am happy to report that after meeting for a strategic planning session in Dearborn, Michigan in November, the NAAM board ended the year with renewed determination and excitement for the future. I would like to thank all of the board members who attended, especially Matt Anderson who made arrangements for the meeting and Jim VanBochove who was our facilitator and who challenged us to think outside the box.

After two days of brainstorming, goals and objectives were defined and a road map to achieve them was created. First and foremost, we plan to continue to enhance the NAAM Conference and to make it a signature experience for our members. This year’s conference will be held at the LeMay Family Collection in Tacoma, Washington. Registration is now open for this important event. If you haven’t already registered- now is the time. In addition, networking and resource opportunities will be improved through creation of a Resource Center for members and communication will be enhanced through utilization of an “on line community”—be watching for details on these in the coming months.

The strategic document the board created is designed to address and meet the distinct needs of our automobile museum membership and to support, educate and encourage all member organizations to operate according to the professional standards of the museum industry. It is also intended to cultivate and celebrate a culture of inclusiveness among members and organizations regardless of size or operating methodology through new mentoring and networking programs.

As this New Year begins, we reflect on the goals and objectives of the previous year; the progress made and the setbacks endured. Many of our members are seeing great change in their organizations in terms of operations, staffing and management. Even NAAM saw change this past year as we sadly accepted Administrative Assistant, Lisa Panko’s resignation. We miss Lisa and her cheerful voice but wish her well in her future endeavors. With Lisa’s decision came a challenge and an opportunity–both were immediately embraced by the board. The challenge was to find a suitable replacement and the opportunity was to enhance the position to meet the growing needs of our organization. Thankfully the board did not have to look too far to find Christine Bobco to fill Lisa’s position. Thanks to Lisa and Christine, the transition was flawless.

Many of you already know Christine, as a National Packard Museum staff member she was an important asset in the Museum’s hosting of the NAAM Conference a few years ago and she has managed the NAAMY Awards program for the past several years. We are extremely pleased Christine has accepted the position and look forward to working with her.

Speaking of the NAAMY’s, while reflecting on the previous year’s accomplishments– now is the time to prepare for the NAAMY competition. One of our strategic goals is to inspire members through shared excellence with the NAAMY program. Please make time to share the great programs, exhibits and work you have done this past year– then come and be inspired by what your colleagues are doing. We all benefit by participation in this great program and individually achieving recognition for excellence in your museums will enhance public awareness of automobile museums as valuable cultural institutions.

As the page is turned to a new year it is clean—a fresh start with new opportunities ahead. The content that will appear on those pages is up to each of us. We can create any outcome for the days ahead that we can envision. We can choose to embrace change and see the “new and different” as refreshing. We can choose to take action and be part of what is written on those pages. Whatever can be imagined can be accomplished– if we are willing to embrace the challenges before us and participate in creating the content of our individual pages. However, we must be willing to seek and gain the knowledge necessary for success and to apply the required effort. Let’s face it, complacency never inspires or wins awards. Complacency is never found amidst progress or excellence.

Your NAAM friends and colleagues are here to assist you as a primary resource for the automobile museum community. We are here to help you gain the insight, knowledge and tools necessary to polish your collection management skills and reach audiences with the many wonderful stories of our automotive history represented by our membership.

That’s the choice all must make each year, each and every day. As a NAAM Board we have determined that being complacent is not an option. We have resolved that moving forward is critical to survival and that growth and change are vital to remaining relevant and maintaining our ability to fulfill our mission.

This is the challenge I offer all of our members: resolve to participate—to learn or try something new for your organization. For many you already know what that one thing is—it’s been there on the shelf for some time and you just haven’t addressed it. For others, it may be learning a new skill or developing expertise in an area you find daunting. Whatever the case– go for it—your NAAM colleagues are here to support your efforts, to inspire you and to assist you along the way. We can all learn from each other and share our experiences with each other. The best way to get it started? Register for the NAAM Conference in Tacoma, Washington! See you there.

Sincerely,

Mary Ann Porinchak

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MISSION STATEMENT

The National Association of Automobile Museums is a professional center of excellence for automobile museums and affiliated organizations that supports, educates and encourages members to operate according to professional standards of the museum industry.

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2017 ANNUAL CONFERENCE

On the Road: Telling History Via Many Different Routes

Welcome to the NAAM 2017 Annual Conference! The theme for the conference is “On the Road: Telling History Via Many Different Routes” hosted by the LeMay Family Collection in the Seattle/Tacoma area. The conference schedule is packed with informative sessions and networking as well as two days of fantastic tours. You will not want to miss it!

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About Spanaway & Seattle-Tacoma: The LeMay Family Collection at Marymount is in Spanaway, Washington, which is five miles south of downtown Tacoma, Washington, on the main tourist road to Mount Rainier National Park. Culturally, because of the military and Boeing industrial/machinist influences, the area is one of the richest “car cultures” in the United States. (Maybe it’s that we’ve never used salt in winter, too.) Pierce County, where we’re located, has one of the highest registrations per capita of anywhere in the United States for classic and vintage cars. It’s also in close proximity to Seattle (approximately 20 miles from SeaTac airport), where some of the best history, technology, art and cultural attractions in the country are located. Tacoma, itself, has built an entire industry around a nearly quarter billion dollars in private investment in cultural tourism through its museum attractions (Highlights include the Museum of Glass, Tacoma Art Museum, LeMay – America’s Car Museum, and the Washington State History Museum, etc.). There’s lots of green and “The Mountain” (Mount Rainier) is always lurking over it all. The main industries are technology, industrial, retail, universities, tourism, and agriculture.

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Information About LeMay Family Collection: The LeMay Family Collection Foundation is a non-profit 501c3 organization with most of its operations at Marymount. Marymount is a historic 87-acre property – a former boys’ military academy run by the Sisters of Saint Dominic. On this property, we are open as a car museum where we have three buildings with over 500 vintage vehicles on display year-round. We also have displays of other Americana and memorabilia (vintage motorcycles, radios, dolls, gas pumps, etc.). We run the museum as a hybrid of a self-guided tour of one building and a docent tour of other buildings. Not just a car museum, the LeMay Family Collection at Marymount is also a place for collections of things that were important to the industrialization of America in the 20th century. If we can figure out how to tell the story, in terms of why it mattered to the automobile, we’re open to creating space for it. It’s still a young museum on a tight budget, but it’s getting its groove rather nicely.

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Early Bird Registration Deadline: February 17, 2017

The early bird conference registration fee for NAAM members is $325. The conference takes place from March 21-24, 2017. The conference starts on Tuesday, the 21th, with optional tours during the day and a Welcome Reception at the LeMay Family Collection at Marymount from 6 p.m. – 8 p.m. and concludes on Friday night, the 24th, with the closing banquet and NAAMY Awards Ceremony. The conference features excellent sessions and tours. It will be a great professional development and networking opportunity. Please see the attached conference schedule and registration form.

Host Hotel & Accommodations: A hotel room block is reserved for the conference at the Best Western Premier Plaza Hotel & Conference Center. Please make reservations early. Call (253) 848-1500 and say you are with the “National Association of Automobile Museums” group to make your reservations.

Best Western Premier Plaza Hotel & Conference Center
620 S Hill Park Dr, Puyallup, WA 98373
(253) 848-1500

Room Rate: $109.00/night (Including tax, the nightly total is $124.72). Also, the hotel is extending the conference room rate for several days before and after the block for anyone who would like to visit the area outside the conference dates.

This conference hotel is nine miles from the LeMay Family Collection at Marymount. Rooms come with free WiFi, flat-screen TVs with DVD players and Keurig coffeemakers. They also have microwaves and minifridges. A hot breakfast buffet is complimentary, as are all-day cookies and hot drinks. Other amenities include a fitness room and an indoor pool with a whirlpool tub and terrace, as well as 3 conference rooms. Happy Hour at the Fireside Bar & Bistro is Monday-Friday from 8pm-Close.

Additional Transportation Information: The closest international airport is the Sea-Tac International Airport (35 miles north of Marymount, 29 miles from the host hotel). Sea-Tac is the North American Hub for Alaska Airlines and the West Coast International Hub for Delta Airlines.

Getting a rental car or using a taxi or Uber driver may be your best way of reaching the host hotel or Marymount after arriving at the airport.

NOTE: Transportation from host hotel to destinations will be provided on Wednesday and Thursday of the Conference. Conference attendees will need to coordinate their own transportation on Tuesday and Friday of the Conference. We strongly suggest a rental car, Uber, or some other taxi service.

Rental Cars & Shuttle Info: http://www.portseattle.org/Sea-Tac/Parking-and-Transportation/Ground-Transportation/Pages/Rental-Cars.aspx

Regional Bus Routes: Check out Pierce Transit for more specific instructions from your location (take Pierce Transit Bus Route #1 to Spanaway from downtown Tacoma).

Weather: Washington is not known as the “Evergreen State” for nothing! The Seattle-Tacoma area has a reputation for being rainy and green – we always say it’s best to dress in layers.

Conference Dress: Attire for the conference is business casual, and business or cocktail attire for the concluding banquet and awards ceremony.

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2017 CONFERENCE SCHOLARSHIP

NAAM is dedicated to helping its members grow professionally through informative annual conferences and networking opportunities. To fulfill this goal, NAAM offers up to 5 conference scholarships each year. The scholarship program is designed for museums with limited financial resources to pay for their staff to attend (annual budgets under $500,000). Awards included $1,000 for travel expenses, plus complimentary conference registration. These valuable scholarships are made possible thanks to our generous sponsorships.

Apply Now: The application process is easy, completed online, and if you have any questions feel free to contact Christine Bobco at c.bobco@packardmuseum.org. The deadline is February 17, 2017.

How: Please visit the NAAM website for scholarship criteria, guidelines and the online application Conference Scholarships.

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CURATORIAL SPOTLIGHT

DEM PHOTODonor Relations
By Derek E. Moore
Crawford Curator of Transportation
Cleveland History Center

Donor relations can mean many things to staff in the museum field. The two biggest areas where donor relations are key is in development (the donors of money) and in collections (the donors of artifacts) although these two can also be combined, (donors of money and artifacts). As this is the curatorial spotlight corner of the NAAM News, I will be focusing on collections donors and the importance of maintaining a good relationship with them. Donors of artifacts give our museums all those wonderful objects that we display in our exhibits that enable us to tell fascinating…yes, fascinating, stories.

As a curator, donor relations can be tricky. The first step in maintaining good donor relations is in the honesty exhibited in saying yes or no to the object that is offered. Sometimes donors reach out to me and ask politely whether the museum would want to receive an item they have, or if it is something that the museum just wouldn’t use. These are a curator’s favorite donors. They get it! They understand that museums can’t collect everything; we have a mission and we develop our collections according to that mission.

Another type of donor is the one who does not understand the collecting process. This is the donor that must be dealt with delicately and diplomatically. They assume as curators we will automatically have the same love and appreciation for their item and that as caretakers of historic artifacts we will automatically share their opinion regarding its value and significance. They don’t understand missions and collection plans. These donors can be complicated and challenging. They don’t always understand that museums don’t have the room, or the budget, to keep every item offered to them. Explaining that the museum cannot accept the item they are offering can offend them if not done properly. Honestly and delicately suggesting the item may be a better fit in another collection or have a better home elsewhere while explaining what may happen if museums collected everything offered is the first step to addressing the situation. Keep in mind this same donor may be one that is able to leave a legacy gift or may own something that does fit the collection. It can be difficult but at times museums must be able to say no to an offer.

This is where a well articulated mission and your collection plan and policy comes into play. These documents are the essence of your museum. They define the parameters of your collection and often provide the process by which a donation is considered. Within its policy the Western Reserve Historical Society has a great support system for handling offers of items that are not immediately recognizable as a fit– it is our Curatorial Council. This is a group of curators and archivists at WRHS who get together and review offers of donations. In the review process to determine relevancy, the item is evaluated in terms of the collection plan. The council then takes a vote on the items presented. If the item does not get approved, the curator is able to go back to the donor and explain that the council determined the item was not a good fit for the permanent collection. This second level decision separates the curator from the process so it is not perceived as a personal decision by the curator. It also illustrates to the donor that the museum collects responsibly.

But, what if you’ve already had the phone call or visit from a possible donor and you said yes to accept their object as a donation and add it to the collection. Now the true donor relationship begins. We have to make sure all of the paperwork is properly done, make sure that the Deed of Gift is signed and the object is legally the museum’s property, make sure the proper tax forms for the donation are sent out, then catalog the object, give it an accession number, and either place it in storage or on exhibit…

SCREEEEECCCCHHHHH!!!!!! The non-existent, yet clearly audible slamming of the brakes is heard.

“Storage OR Exhibit, you mean it won’t ALWAYS be on exhibit?!” says the donor.

The art of explaining to a donor that the item will not always be on display in an exhibit is very important in the donor relationship. The donor has to understand that, as a museum, we cannot display all of our artifacts all the time; we just don’t have the space. We use artifacts to tell stories in our exhibits and the donated object might not always be relevant to exhibits in our galleries. It’s important to make sure the donor understands the object will be cared for even while it is not on display. Caring for the donated object is the institutions lifelong commitment to the donor relationship. We must do our best, as stewards of history, to preserve the items donated to us for as long as possible. This keeps the donor, and the donor’s family, pleased with your institution which may lead them to become financial donors and ambassadors of your museum and its mission.

Poor stewardship of objects in your collection can be detrimental to your institution, as we have seen play out in the news in recent months at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago. Famed land speed racer Craig Breedlove was allowed to sue the Museum of Science and Industry over damages to the Spirit of America Land Speed Car while it was on loan to the museum for 50 years.

I am not here to pass judgment on the Museum of Science and Industry, nor Craig Breedlove, but this is a fascinating case that illustrates what can happen to donor (or in the case, lender) relations when communication breaks down. Clearly, Mr. Breedlove was not made aware of the multiple times the vehicle was cut apart to be moved in and out of museum galleries and the numerous cases of vandalism by visitors carving their names into the vehicle. So consequently, he was unaware of the condition it would be in when it was returned to him.

Mr. Breedlove, obviously upset with the situation, having thought that the museum would care for his vehicle, took legal action and was allowed to file suit against the Museum of Science and Industry. Why? Because the judge felt that the Museum of Science and Industry had not lived up to the standards and best practices of the American Alliance of Museums, by which the museum is accredited.

Now, there is a lot more to this lawsuit than just these brief comments, but it is an example of living up to the standards and best practices that the AAM has set for us in the museum field, standards by which we must operate even if our institutions are not accredited by the AAM. We have an obligation to our donors and the objects they donate to us to preserve pieces of history. If we fail at that duty, then we do incredible damage to donor relations for our museum, we fail at our institutions purpose and this reflects poorly on the greater museum community.

In the end, remember how significant donor relations are to our institutions and that clear communication with donors is vital to a successful museum. Without our donors, we would not exist. When you say “yes” to a donation, make sure the donor is clear on the museum’s intentions regarding the object, and if you say “no”, try to make the declined donor understand why and that you appreciate their kindness in thinking of your institution. Once the object is in your museum’s care, be good stewards of the object and show the donor that they made the right decision in donating that amazing piece of history to your museum.

And finally, if we learn anything from the Spirit of America case, keep up communications with donors (and lenders!) even if something bad has happened. It shows that our institutions truly care about the people who support what we do.

Good luck out there working with your donors. Build strong donor relationships so that we can build a community of pleased donors around our awesome museums.

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NEWS FROM MEMBER MUSEUMS

JB PHOTO- AACAAACA Museum – Hershey, Pennsylvania New Leader Takes the Wheel at The AACA Museum in Hershey

Jeffrey E. Bliemeister has been named the new Executive Director of The Antique Automobile Club of America (AACA) Museum in Hershey, PA. He was selected for this position by the AACA Museum Board Search Committee following an extensive search. Congratulations Jeff!

Jeff is no stranger to the AACA Museum as he was part of the staff here who opened the Museum as its Curator. Jeff was the Curator here at the AACA Museum from February 2003 through November 2011. Jeff has a Master of Arts in Museum Studies from the Cooperstown Graduate Program co-sponsored by the State University of New York and the New York State Historical Association. He also has a Bachelor of Arts in history with a minor in Political Science and concentration in Anthropology from the State University of New York.

Jeff will be returning to the AACA Museum from his current role as the Site Administrator for the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania located in Strasburg, PA.   Jeff has a strong background of prior work experience in a variety of other Museum settings including: Site Administrator for the Pennsylvania Lumber Museum in Potter County, PA; Curator for the Renfrew Museum and Park in Waynesboro, PA and Director of Hyde Hall in Springfield, NY, and a Curatorial Consultant for the National Soccer Hall of Fame in Oneonta, NY.

“On behalf of the AACA Museum Board of Directors, we’re extremely happy to welcome Jeff back to the AACA Museum” stated Henry W. “Hank” Hallowell, III,President of the AACA Museum Board of Directors. “Jeff’s prior affiliation with theAACA Museum, his relationships in the automotive hobby, along with his years of experience in the Museum field make him the perfect candidate to step into this role.”

Jeff currently resides in Palmyra, Pennsylvania with his wife Jennifer who is a nurse at the Penn Station Milton S. Hershey Medical Center along with his two children Max and Emily who are currently pursuing college studies. Jeff officially began as Executive Director at the AACA Museum on December 12, 2016.

Nancy Gates, Director of Marketing & Communications, AACA Museum

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CS PHOTO - GilmoreGilmore Car Museum – Hickory Corners, Michigan
Gilmore Car Museum Appoints New Executive Director

The Gilmore Car Museum near Kalamazoo, MI is pleased to announce the appointment of Chris Shires to the position of Executive Director effective January 2, 2017. He replaces long-time Director Michael Spezia who will retire on February 15, 2017.

“Chris (Shires) has a strong background in museums and community relations” said Bill Parfet, Chairman of the foundation that operates the Gilmore Car Museum and grandson of its founder, Donald Gilmore. “He will be stepping down as the Executive Director of the Holland (MI) Historical Trust and brings a wealth of museum operating experience to our organization.”

Retiring Director Michael Spezia joined the Gilmore Car Museum in 2001 and led the Museum through the largest expansion in the organization’s 50 year history. This involved the addition of several historic buildings and on-site partner museums including Cadillac, Lincoln, and Model A Ford. Today the Gilmore Car Museum is recognized as North America’s largest auto museum with over 189,000 square feet of exhibit space, the size and breadth of its collection, the 90-acre historic campus, and its seven individual partner museums.

Parfet pointed out that the Gilmore Car Museum has seen “phenomenal growth over the past 15 years, with 2016—our 50th anniversary—marking the museum’s most successful year to date,” and acknowledges the significant role Michael has played in our success.

Earlier in 2016 when Spezia announced his pending retirement, the Gilmore Car Museum Board of Trustees undertook a nationwide search to find his replacement. Shires is a native of Maryland and holds a Bachelor’s Degree in History from Marshall University in Huntington, WV and a Master of Arts in History and a Graduate Certificate in Museum Studies from the University of Missouri—St. Louis.

Shires joined the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, OH a year before it opened to the public in 2004. He went on to serve six years there, first as Interpretive Services Manager and later as Director of Exhibits, Education, and Programs. In 2009 he became Director of Interpretation and Programs for the historic Edsel and Eleanor Ford House in Grosse Pointe Shores, MI. He was appointed to the post of Executive Director of the Holland Historic Trust three years ago.

“I’m very confident in turning the Gilmore Car Museum over to Chris,” stated outgoing Director Michael Spezia. “His strong museum qualifications, experience, and desire to share history with the community will serve the future of the Museum well.” Michael also wished to thank all of the supporters of the Museum during his stewardship.

“The Holland Museum is a wonderful museum and community resource,” Shires stated recently when he announced his acceptance of his new position with the Gilmore Car Museum. “I am most proud of the plan we put together and our ability to continue to deliver on our mission despite limited resources.”

Shires expressed that he’s had a passion for history for as long as he could remember and grew to love the stories behind artifacts as much as the objects themselves. He is genuinely thrilled by the chance to continue to pursue something that he enjoys so immensely—“sharing the stories from history and becoming a part of the Gilmore Car Museum team.”

Jay Follis, Director of Marketing, Gilmore Car Museum

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DEM2 PHOTONational Corvette Museum – Bowling Green, Kentucky
National Corvette Museum Names Curator

Derek E. Moore of Garrettsville, OH has been named Curator for the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, KY, previously serving as the Crawford Curator of Transportation History at the Western Reserve Historical Society in Cleveland, OH.

As Curator of Transportation History, Moore was responsible for researching the history of automobiles and aviation of Cleveland and Northeast Ohio, developing exhibits and programming on the history of automobiles, aircraft and related transportation technologies. In addition, Moore created and maintained records on the collection, developed lectures, essays and summaries for use in exhibits and publications and was responsible for the conservation and preservation of the 150+ collection of historic vehicles and aircraft.

Prior to his employment at the Western Reserve Historical Society, he served in several roles including Conservation Specialist of the Transportation Collection at The Henry Ford in Dearborn, MI and interned at the Alfred P. Sloan Museum in Flint, MI.

As Curator for the National Corvette Museum, Moore will be responsible for researching, developing and producing exhibits as well as the planning, acquisition and/or loan, safekeeping and cataloging of collection objects and vehicles related to Corvette history.

“The National Corvette Museum is one of the most welcoming environments I’ve experienced. It is an incredible museum and is so unique in that it is focused on one community – and it has that community feeling about it,” said Moore. “One of the biggest challenges currently facing museums is the decreasing number of visitors. Younger generations are losing interest in museums as they turn to more and more handheld technology. To bring them back to the museums, we need to work with that technology and I look forward to helping the NCM add cutting edge technology that will help freshen up the exhibits and get younger generations excited about visiting the museum.”

Moore grew up in St. Charles, MI and is a graduate of Eastern Michigan University of Ypsilanti, MI with a Bachelor of Science in History. He is a member of the Society of Automotive Engineers, serves as Treasurer of the National Association of Automobile Museums, and is a past board member of the National Automotive History Collection at the Detroit Public Library.

He and fiancée, Christine Bobco, are auto enthusiasts and currently own several antique vehicles including a 1917 Overland, 1923 Peerless, and a 1961 Ford Falcon, and hope to be adding a Corvette to their collection soon. The couple will relocate to South Central Kentucky in March and his first day at the Museum will be the 6th.

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CCCA Museum – Hickory Corners, Michigan
Announcing Clive Cussler as Grand Marshal at this years’ CCCAM Experience!
June 2 – 4, 2017

We are honored and privileged to host Clive Cussler, best-selling American adventure novelist, underwater explorer, and noted collector of 115 of the finest examples of custom coachwork and 50’s convertibles to be found anywhere.

After working in the advertising industry as copywriter, creative director, and producer of radio and television commercials, Cussler began writing books in 1965. He is the author of more than 70 books including two coffee-table books; one titled Built for Adventure The Classic Automobiles of Clive Cussler and Dirk Pitt reveals the history and acquisition of his outstanding collection of rare, classic, and antique automobiles. His thriller novels have reached The New York Times fiction best-seller list at least 20 times. Additionally, two of his novels, Raise the Titanic! and Sahara were adapted to screenplay and released as movies. Aside from his novels, Cussler has also written two children’s books.

Clive is also the founder and chairman of the National Underwater & Marine Agency, (NUMA) a non-profit organization that dedicates itself to American maritime and naval history. Cussler and his crew of marine experts and NUMA volunteers have discovered over 60 historically significant underwater wreck sites. After verifying their finds, NUMA turns the rights to the artifacts over to non-profits, universities, or government entities all over the world. Some of these finds include the C.S.S. Hunley, best known as the first submarine to sink a ship in battle and the U-20, the U-boat that sank the Lusitania. In addition to being Chairman of NUMA, Cussler is a fellow in both the Explorers Club of New York and the Royal Geographic Society in London.

Clive’s extraordinary car collection, several with famous and historic value, is garaged in the Cussler Museum in Arvada, CO. Many of the fabulous vehicles have been a large part of his best-selling novel series. His impressive list of classics includes:

  • 1918 Cadillac V8 Touring
  • 1921 Rolls Royce Silver Ghost
  • 1925 Isotta Fraschini
  • 1925 Minerva Town Car
  • 1926 Hispano Suiza
  • 1928 Cadillac Town Car
  • 1929 Bentley Blower
  • 1929 Duesenberg Boattail
  • 1929 Packard Roadster 640
  • 1930 Cadillac V-16 Town Car
  • 1930 Lincoln V8 Town Car
  • 1930 Packard Boat-tail
  • 1932 Auburn Boat-tail
  • 1932 Stutz DV32 Town Car
  • 1933 American Austin Bantim
  • 1936 Avions Voisin
  • 1936 Packard V12 Town Car
  • 1936 Pierce Arrow V12 Berlin
  • 1937 Cord V12 Berlin
  • 1937 Rolls Royce Phantom III Town Car
  • 1938 Bugatti 59C
  • 1939 Mercedes Benz 540K Saloon
  • 1940 Cadillac V16 Limousine
  • 1948 Delahaye Cabriolet
  • 1948 Packard Custom 8
  • 1948 Talbot Lago Grand Sport Coupe

Be sure to join us June 2nd – 4th at the CCCA Museum Experience in Hickory Corners, MI. You’ll be able to visit with Clive throughout the week-end beginning Friday evening at the BBQ. He’ll come along Saturday morning for our beautiful country driving tour which includes a visit to OFF Brothers’ private collection and a lakeside lunch at the Gull Lake Country Club. The Saturday evening banquet will kick off with a reception where artists will display their automobile fine art to be auctioned. Classic-era fashions are encouraged during Sunday’s Concours and ladies, be sure to attend the Chocolates Making Demonstration & Tasting in the early afternoon. This is a week-end you won’t want to miss! Register online at www.cccamuseum.org or call 269-352-9947.

Carol Vogt, CCCA Museum Executive Director

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Henry Ford Museum – Dearborn, Michigan
Henry Ford Museum Pops the Hoods of Some of the Most Iconic Vehicles in the World during Engines Exposed
More than 60 vehicles exposed Jan. 14 – Feb. 28, 2017

Beginning January 14 through February 28, auto enthusiasts will have the rare opportunity to look under the hoods of some of the most iconic vehicles ever made during Engines Exposed at Henry Ford Museum. More than 60 vehicles inside the Driving America exhibit will have their hoods popped, including a look at the 1926 Rolls-Royce New Phantom Limousine and the iconic 1967 Mark IV engine that powered Ford to victory at LeMans fifty years ago.

Engines Exposed provides guests the unique look at the engines that changed the automotive world forever including the 1909 Ford Model T, 1943 Willys-Overland Jeep, 1949 Volkswagen, 1997 General Motors EV1. During this limited engagement, guests are invited to Driving America’s Car Court to discuss The Henry Ford’s world-class car collection and explore automotive innovations every day with our presenters. Topics change daily and may include everything from the basics to a deeper dive on one of the iconic vehicles in the collection. Auto fans will also have the rare opportunity to gain expert insight and take a closer look at our engines through the help of our digitized collection from Matt Anderson, curator of transportation inside the Drive-in Theater on Saturday, January 21 at 3:30 pm and Saturday, February 18 at 3:30 pm. Along with special presentations, guests can explore our engine collection on their own on one of our 18 digital kiosks throughout Driving America.

In honor of National Engineers Week, February 18-25, The Henry Ford will celebrate these transformative dreamers and doers with daily hands-on learning opportunities and the new film Dream Big: Engineering Our World opening February 18 inside the Giant Screen Experience. During the week, special guest experts will also be onsite including Robert Scott, director of diversity initiatives for the University of Michigan College of Engineering on Friday, February 24 at 10 am in the Museum Gallery Plaza.

For the young auto enthusiast there are plenty of opportunities to get hands-on during Make Something Saturdays from 10 am – 3 pm in the Museum Gallery Plaza throughout the run of Engines Exposed. In January, young makers can learn to solder, create their own tinkering journal or build a bot and in February they will have the chance to explore the evolution of vehicle power sources to create their own battery-powered model cars.

Melissa Foster, Media and Film Relations Manager, The Henry Ford

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Hudson PHOTO 1Seal Cove Auto Museum – Seal Cove, Maine
1910 Hudson with Historical Connection to Mount Desert Island on Loan at Seal Cove Auto Museum

An antique auto with some some fascinating connections to Mount Desert Island arrived to the Seal Cove Auto Museum in December. The car, built in 1910 by the Hudson Motor Car Company, will be on loan from Jan Kendrick, of Bryant Pond, Maine, through the 2017 season. According to Ms. Kendrick, the Hudson is one of only seven Touring Cars that are known to exist of the 2,099 manufactured in 1910.

The car is powered by a four-cylinder, 22.5 horsepower engine coupled to a three-speed, sliding gear transmission, making it in Ms. Kendrick’s words, “probably the easiest car I’ve ever driven and there have been a lot. It drives like butter and I think that kind of says it all.”

The Hudson Motor Car Company began operations in 1909 with Roscoe B. Jackson at the helm as its General Manager, one of the five men at the core of its early leadership, and who would later become President of the Company. During his time as Hudson’s President, Jackson began taking respites on Mount Desert Island. Both he and Edsel Ford, son of Henry Ford and also a summer resident of Mount Desert Island, befriended Clarence C. Little, a Harvard-trained geneticist who had served as President at the University of Maine, as well as the University of Michigan (Jackson’s Alma Mater.)

Hudson PHOTO 2In 1929, it was with Jackson’s and Ford’s financial support that Clarence Little was able to found a genetics research facility in Bar Harbor. When Jackson died suddenly on a trip to Europe in March of that year, Little and his board decided to name the research unit in Jackson’s honor, the Roscoe B. Jackson Memorial Laboratory.

The Seal Cove Auto Museum is so pleased and thankful for Ms. Kendrick’s loan of this wonderful car that has such an interesting local connection. Visitors can see the Hudson at the Museum when it opens May 1, or over the winter by appointment.

Hope Rowan, Marketing & Development Director, Seal Cove Auto Museum

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TAM PHOTOTupelo Automobile Museum – Tupelo, Mississippi
Tupelo Automobile Museum To Raffle Fully-Restored 1959 Chevrolet Apache Pickup
Truck- 10,000 tickets now available for sale with proceeds benefiting historic museum

The Tupelo Automobile Museum promises to start engines and excitement during 2017 with plans to raffle a canary yellow 1959 Chevrolet Apache ½ Ton Stepside Pickup Truck.

Vintage automobile enthusiasts now have a chance to own a piece of auto history for only $25, while supporting one of Mississippi’s most important museums.

The Apache half-ton stepside pickup truck boasts many features including off-frame restoration, custom interior, a 350/5.7 liter crate engine, TH 350 automatic transmission, air conditioning, bed cover, ground effect lights and complete build sheets records.

“We have been searching for two years for the perfect classic vehicle to raffle for a museum fundraiser. When this impeccably restored ’59 Chevrolet Apache became available we knew our search was over. It provides the perfect combination of classic culture and modern comfort features which will appeal to everyone,” said Jane Spain, Executive Director of the museum.

Ticket sales are open now and will continue throughout the year until 10,000 tickets are sold. The winning ticket will be selected at noon on December 16, 2017 at the museum. Ticket holders need not be present to win.

Tickets may be purchased for $25 or 5 for $100 at the Tupelo Automobile Office: 1 Otis Boulevard, Tupelo, Mississippi 38804. Across from BancorpSouth Arena or by calling 662-842-4242 for ticket purchase by mail information.

Contest rules and regulations are posted at the Tupelo Automobile Museum and online at www.tupeloauto.com.

-Jane Spain, Executive Director, Tupelo Automobile Museum

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Motte Historical Museum – Sun City, California
5th Annual Big Barn Classic Car Show April 29, 2017

Car enthusiasts please register in advance, 11 classes of cars will be judged awarded trophies in each class including 1 best over all and club with the largest participation. Live band Bodie playing outlaw rock, and Jerome Robinson from the second generation platters sounds of the 50’s – 60’s. Vendor/exhibitors and festival foods available for purchase. The Motte Museum open Free general admission and parking in the north Field. Car show entrants can contact us for an application or download one on the website www.mottemuseum.com fee 25.00 includes a goodie bag and event shirt.

-Maria Mathey, Motte Historical Museum

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Heart of Route 66 Auto Museum – SAPULPA, Oklahoma
66-foot-tall vintage-inspired gas pump nears completion at Heart of Route 66 Auto Museum

A new 66-foot-tall vintage-inspired gas pump is about to be added to the long list of eye-catching attractions along Route 66 in Oklahoma. The gas pump will help draw visitors to the Heart of Route 66 Auto Museum, a 10,000-sqaure-foot facility featuring vintage cars and a variety of exhibits featuring cars, the military and Route 66.

The frame of the large structure has already been constructed and will now be wrapped and finished to look like a vintage gas pump.

“Getting the gas pump constructed is a dream come true,” said Richard Holmes, president of the Heart of Route 66 Auto Museum. “It is so exciting and our recent guests from England and Australia are amazed at how big the steel structure looks.”

The museum has seen a steady stream of visitors from Europe, Australia, South America, Asia and across the United States since it opened in June.

The museum is currently hosting the Chip Foose designed Dodge “HemisFear.” Part supercar, part custom and part hotrod, the Hemisfear is perhaps the most renowned Foose vehicle. The museum is also hosting a concept 1965 Chevrolet Impala, The Imposter, designed by Chip Foose, star of the reality television show “Overhaulin’”. The car, which took seven years to design and complete, has traveled around the country and won contests in Las Vegas and Denver, among other cities.

Lina Holmes, Executive Director, Heart of Route 66 Auto Museum

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The Automobile Driving Museum – El Segundo, CA
Announces New Exhibit: A Woman’s Touch on the Automobile Industry

A Woman’s Touch on the Automobile Industry began January 22nd and runs through May12th. We will portray the history of women in the automotive industry, the key players of yesteryear and today, the Sirens of Chrome and the role of the Automobile in the Suffrage Movement. The purpose of this exhibit is to recognize the impact that women have had on the automobile industry from the inception of the automobile to modern times. These women have been drivers, inventors, CEOs, writers, designers and models.

We will be showcasing 5 cars during the exhibit, and the most noted will be Shirley Muldowney’s restored 1977 World Champion Top Fuel Dragster. We will have a Meet & Greet with Shirley Muldowney at the museum (date TBD, March or summer) and an all women car show March 25th – Girls in the Garage Car Show & Fashion Exchange.

“Grease Girl” (A.K.A. Kristin Cline) will be offering “Ladies Car Care 101” classes at the museum for $5 each on Feb. 19th, March 18th and May 7th.

The museum will also be hosting at least one car show per month, beginning with our Tri Five Chevy Car show on January 14th.

The museum is looking forward to a very event filled year with education on the history of the automobile and participation in many car shows and events.

Tara L. Hitzig, Executive Director, The Automobile Driving Museum

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Templar Motors Factory Display – Lakewood, Ohio
Announces TEMPLAR MOTORS CENTENNIAL 2017: The Superfine Small Car

Please check our Templar Website, www.templarmotors.com, for future Events celebrating the Centennial at the Templar Motors Factory Display in 2017. The Templar Motors Factory Display is located in Lakewood, Ohio, in the Original Templar Motors Factory/Assembly Building on the 3rd Floor where all of the 6700+ Templar Cars were Assembled from 1917-to-1924!

TEMPLAR MOTOR FACTORY DISPLAY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uqZ6H9PfhPQ

Dave Buehler, Templar Motor Factory Display

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World of Speed Motorsports Museum – Wilsonville, Oregon
World of Speed Launches New Exhibit Featuring Women in Drag Racing

World of Speed, an educational and interactive motorsports museum, announces the newest edition of its Women in Racing exhibit, which was unveiled on Saturday, Dec 10. Women in Racing showcases women in motorsports and highlights how women’s participation has grown throughout the decades. The next iteration of the exhibit focuses specifically on female drag racers.

Each racer will be portrayed through personal memorabilia, photos and video. The racers include:

  • Angelle Sampey: Three-time champion, Sampey is the winningest female driver in NHRA history with 43 win, and the third-most for a Pro Stock Motorcycle driver.
  • Kacee Pitts: Having raced since she was 10 years old, the now 18 year old Pitts won 5 Wally awards by age 15 and two Woodburn Dragstrip track championships at age 16.
  • Peggy Llewellyn: In 2007, Llewellyn won the NHRA POWERade event in Dallas, becoming the first woman of color to win a professional motorsports event.
  • Sue Mitchell: Local Super Pro Mitchell has been racing her modified 1963 Chevy II Nova Suzie II since 1976, setting an AHRA world record in 1981.

Sue Mitchell and Kacee Pitts will be at World of Speed for the exhibit’s unveiling, and invite museum guests to join them for the following events:

  • 11:00 a.m.: Exhibit unveiling and ribbon cutting ceremony
  • 12:00 p.m.: Talk and Q&A with Kacee Pitts about Jr. Drag Racing in the main gallery
  • 1:00 p.m.: Meet and greet with racers and fan card signing

Women featured in the exhibit are both local and national, two-wheel and four-wheel racers, professional and amateur, a teenager alongside a woman with 40 years of racing under her belt; yet all of them have made their mark in drag racing.

World of Speed initially launched its Women in Racing exhibit in fall 2015, featuring racers Cindi Lux, Lyn St. James, Courtney Force, Betty Burkland and Michelle Mille. The museum’s new iteration of this exhibit will run through December 2017.

World of Speed is located at 27490 SW 95th Ave. in Wilsonville, Ore.

Angie Galimanis, World of Speed

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World of Speed Motorsports Museum – Wilsonville, Oregon
World of Speed Launches New Exhibit Featuring the First American-Made Formula One Race Car, The Scarab

World of Speed, an educational and interactive motorsports museum, announces its newest exhibit featuring the Scarab, which was unveiled on Tuesday, January 10 and runs through Tuesday, April 2. The Scarab was the first American-made Formula One race car, and the exhibit showcases what is considered, to this day, to be one of the most beautiful race cars ever created. The Scarab was dreamed up by a handsome young playboy heir, Lance Reventlow, who wanted something that money alone couldn’t buy and designed by a team of anti-establishment hot-rodders from California.

“We are thrilled to be the first museum to showcase the Scarab,” said David Schaeffer, World of Speed executive director. “This is an incredible car with an amazing backstory, as told through our interactive exhibit. We look forward to sharing its unique history with our guests.”

After World War II, factories that had formerly churned out warplanes were making automobiles, and many military airstrips were becoming raceway circuits. From the Nürburgring to Indianapolis, racing was back. The new Formula One race series was dominated by European car makers, like Mercedes-Benz, Ferrari and Maserati. The designers of the Scarab dreamed it would compete amongst the European giants that dominated the racing world.

“The Scarab’s story is one of trial and tribulation, of scrappy drivers who challenged rivals — and themselves — on race courses from Riverside, Calif. to Silverstone, England,” said Ron Huegli, World of Speed’s curator. “Our Scarab exhibit is about an incredible year of racing. Visitors will love it!”

Angie Galimanis, World of Speed

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New Book Announcement:
Roadster Guide to America’s Classic Car Museums & Attractions
Available in bulk purchases (10 or more) at $12/copy, shipping included

Motoring from coast to coast, the Roadster Guide to America’s Classic Car Museums & Attractions features over 250 auto-themed sights. Ranging from the Stanley Museum in Maine to the California Automobile Museum, the book helps car buffs plan exciting adventures, or discover a fun car museum close to home.

Whether it’s Model Ts, the “tail fin” era, muscle cars, early racecars, and so much more, fans of classic cars will find all their favorites in one place in this extensive 340-page book filled with more than 60 photos.

The destinations vary from full-throttle car collections, like the Simeone Foundation Automotive Museum in Philadelphia and the Henry Ford Museum, to hidden treasures like Delaware’s Marshall Steam Museum and the National Sprint Car Hall of Fame in Iowa.

This unique travel guide also includes intriguing automotive sights like:

  • The Dale Earnhardt Trail in “The Intimidator’s” North Carolina hometown,
  • Cadillac Ranch in Texas,
  • Carhenge in Nebraska, and many, many more.

Bring the Roadster Guide to America’s Classic Car Museums & Attractions along on your next road trip to discover fascinating car museums and vintage car attractions across America.

Author Michael Milne writes about classic car museums and road trips for the Philadelphia Inquirer, Hemmings Motor News, AAA, and other publications. He may be contacted by email at Michael@ChangesinLongitude.com.

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New Book Announcement: More Than Automobiles: The Packards of Warren, Ohio

The National Packard Museum proudly announces a new book for Packard enthusiasts, More Than Automobiles: The Packards of Warren, Ohio by A.J. Balfour. The book is available through the museum gift store online at www.packardmuseum.org for $34.95. All proceeds benefit the museum!

Stories about the Packards have been told many times throughout the years. Almost all of them have been related to the fine automobile that bears the Packard name. But the Packard family story is about much more than automobiles. It is of a close family of accomplishment, tragedy, business success, affluence and much more. More Than Automobiles: The Packards of Warren, Ohio focuses on the lives of Warren Packard and his five adult children, two generations from Warren, Ohio that contributed so much to their hometown and to America.

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NAAM E-NEWS – September 2016, Volume 18, Issue 3

September 23, 2016 in Uncategorized

NAAM E-NEWS – September 2016, Volume 18, Issue 3

In This IssueMaryAnn Porinchak

President’s Message

By: MaryAnn Porinchak

Greetings NAAM Members.

It’s hard to believe it has been four months since our conference in Bar Harbor, Maine. As always it was an amazing mix of stimulating programming and insight into the operations of our colleagues. Rainey Bench of Seal Cove along with Russ Rocknak of Owls Head Museum and their volunteers and staff were gracious hosts. Their efforts provided a truly excellent environment in which to network with colleagues, sharpen skills and explore new opportunities.

If you were not able to attend I encourage you to begin planning now for next year in Tacoma, Washington where we will be hosted by the LeMay Family Collection.

I want to thank the board of directors for their willingness to continue to serve this important organization. The climate in which we work is one of great opportunity but very little discretionary time; so carving a slice of time for NAAM is greatly appreciated.

I looked around the room during the awards banquet this year and realized there were a lot of young faces and mine wasn’t one of them. It’s hard to believe I have been a member of this organization for sixteen years. It was a relatively new organization when I joined but it was the single most important resource for our new museum. NAAM was the place I went to get answers to a multitude of dilemmas and questions and it never disappointed. Attending conferences kept us up-to-date on trends, marketing, management and a host of other topics. During the remainder of the year, there were always those special “go to” individuals like Jackie Frady, Wendell Strode and Judith Endelman who willingly shared their knowledge and experience regarding our specific quandaries outside of the conference. Like great mentors and coaches they were keenly interested in ensuring our success—sometimes a word of encouragement was all that was necessary. Over the years, these professionals and others like them have sacrificed a great deal of their time, talent and resources to ensure the National Association of Automobile Museums would provide the necessary education, information and support for the uniquely diverse group that exists within the automobile museum field. It is my hope that our newer members will find this organization to be as valuable as I did and that all members will endeavor to network with colleagues, share information and ideas and continue to strengthen our organization for the future.

We are an eclectic mix of size, style, method and management but we also have a great deal in common and much to share with each other. In the grand scheme of things, we are all in the same vehicle so to speak and on the same journey. Though our methods and operations may be different, at the end of the day we are linked together by the responsibility and obligation to preserve and protect the collections with which we have been entrusted and to continue to tell the stories of the automobile.

As we look toward the future, there will be obstacles along the way just to make it interesting and fun. After all who enjoys a ride without a few twists and turns? However, at every turn there is a new and exciting road on which to travel. The drive could take us into the always stimulating land of collection management, or on a tour of utilization of new and innovative technology to reach our audiences. The road could lead to the exhilarating field of learning to operate the extremely complicated 200+ breaker exhibit lighting panels or on a lively walk through policy and procedure updates and “AAM Best Practices”. The excursion could take months or even years of preparation but none-the-less it is worth every effort applied. The path to excellence is a narrow one but it is easily identified—we need only to embark with the proper attitude, resources and determination.

In addition to determination, an element of bravery will be necessary. That ghastly specter “Change appears in every fabric of our lives–museums are not immune to feeling its effects or influence. It causes us to squirm. To remain vital and relevant we must be brave and willing to embrace that which makes us squirm a bit. It is that new technology, idea or way of thinking that will launch us into the next decade and beyond. If we are not willing to squirm from time to time we are not shedding our old skin and making room for new growth. If we don’t have growth we cease to exist.

This is not to say we should cast off cautious and conservative behavior in favor of new trends. Rather, we must diligently calculate and incorporate the appropriate “change” that can be judiciously and cautiously assimilated into our operations.

Therefore, with our gaze ever on the vision and mission of our respective organizations we will utilize the wisdom of experience and historical consequence to selectively include those new tools, methods and ideas that exist within the realm of technology, ideology and social communication to promote growth and vitality for the future. (If we must, we can think of it as fertilizer for our operations—I cannot repeat the word that escapes our lips when faced with “Change” but we all recognize it as another name for fertilizer).

I am excited about the future of NAAM and honored and humbled to serve as president. Over the years the leadership has laid a solid foundation on which to build for the future. The board wrestled with decisions with a sincere determination to ensure the outcome would benefit all members. With the dedication and skill of our board we will continue to judiciously and prudently examine opportunities and present them to our membership.

To continue to ensure NAAM is serving the needs of its members, the board will again embark on a strategic planning session to set goals, map our future and determine priorities for the coming years.

I trust you are as excited as I am about 2016 and that you will help us continue our tradition of success through your involvement and support and by encouraging other colleagues to join who may not already be members. Please don’t hesitate to reach out to me, or any member of our Board of Directors with questions, comments or concerns. We are happy to hear from you. Enjoy your events and activities and check in on the Forum when you can.

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MISSION STATEMENT

The National Association of Automobile Museums is a professional center of excellence for automobile museums and affiliated organizations that supports, educates and encourages members to operate according to professional standards of the museum industry.

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2016 ANNUAL CONFERENCE

We sincerely thank the Seal Cove Museum for hosting a remarkable conference for NAAM in Bar Harbor, Maine, from May 3 – 7, 2016. We especially thank Raney Bench Director of the Seal Cove Museum and her staff for coordinating endless details and the Owls Head Transportation Museum team for their assistance in many areas.

There were 80 attendees, many for the first time, representing 40 museum entities, twelve informative sessions, two tour destinations, five scholarships awarded and 29 NAAMY Awards presented.

The closing banquet, and the highly-anticipated NAAMY Awards presentation by Christine Bobco of the National Packard Museum, and Derek Moore of the Western Reserve Historical Society. It was a delightful evening of warm conversation and delicious dining.

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Thank You to Our Supporters

We extend our heartfelt appreciation to our generous sponsors, whose support helped make this conference a great success:

  • Hagerty – the official insurance provider of the National Association of Automobile Museums
  • The Bahre Collection – sponsor of the opening reception
  • Group Delphi – sponsor of the banquet band
  • Richard H. Driehaus Trust – general sponsor
  • Eaton Peabody – general sponsor
  • Motor Car Memories Inc. – general sponsor
  • Reliable Carriers – general sponsor

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2015 NAAMY AWARD WINNERS

Congratulations to our 2015 NAAMY Award Winners who were recognized at the 2016 Annual Conference! Each award recognizes industry leaders for achievement, professionalism and creativity. NAAMYs are designed to further promote professionalism in automotive museum managerial, curatorial, educational and promotional work.

Congratulations to the following award winners:

2015 NAAMY Award winners

Division I

Museums with budgets less than $300,000

Books and Exhibit Catalogs

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – BMW Car Club of America Foundation

Collateral Materials

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – BMW Car Club of America Foundation

Events and Public Promotions

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – LeMay Family Collection

2nd Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – BMW Car Club of America Foundation

3rd Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Wills Sainte Claire Automobile Museum

Interpretive Exhibits

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – National Packard Museum

2nd Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Wills Sainte Claire Automobile Museum

Newsletters and Magazines

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – BMW Car Club of America Foundation

2nd Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – The William E. Swigart, Jr. Automobile Museum

3rd Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Wills Sainte Claire Automobile Museum

Website Design

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – National Packard Museum

2nd Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Wisconsin Automotive Museum

Division II

Museums with budgets greater than $300,000

Collateral Materials

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Blackhawk Automotive Museum

3rd Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Classic Car Club of America

Educational Programs

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – National Automobile Museum (The Harrah Collection)

2nd Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Antique Automobile Club of America Museum

Events and Public Promotions

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Owls Head Transportation Museum

2nd Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Antique Automobile Club of America Museum

3rd Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Antique Automobile Club of America Museum

Film and Video

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Owls Head Transportation Museum

2nd Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Antique Automobile Club of America Museum

3rd Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Antique Automobile Club of America Museum

Interpretive Exhibits

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – San Diego Automotive Museum

2nd Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Gilmore Car Museum

3rd Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum

Newsletters and Magazines

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Owls Head Transportation Museum

2nd Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Antique Automobile Club of America Museum

3rd Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – National Automobile Museum (The Harrah Collection)

Website Design

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – National Corvette Museum

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2016 CONFERENCE SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

Congratulations to five NAAM members who received scholarships to attend the 2016 Annual Conference. Awards included $1,000 for travel expenses, plus complimentary conference registration. These valuable scholarships were made possible thanks to our generous sponsorships.

NAAM is dedicated to helping its members grow professionally through informative annual conferences and networking opportunities. To fulfill this goal, NAAM offers conference scholarships each year. The scholarship program is designed for museums with limited financial resources to pay for their staff to attend.

Congratulations to our 2016 recipients:

Christine Bobco, Assistant Director of Operations, National Packard Museum

Dawn Bondus Mueller, Executive Director, Wisconsin Automotive Museum

Roger Luksik, President/Trustee, Packard Proving Grounds

David Stevens, Executive Director/Trustee, Pierce-Arrow Museum

Stephanie Tripp, Research Librarian, Rolls-Royce Foundation

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NEWS FROM MEMBER MUSEUMS

Donald StreamerGilmore Car Museum – Hickory Corners, Michigan

The Birth of the Gilmore Car Museum

This year marks the Gilmore Car Museum’s 50th anniversary of being open to the public – a milestone reached by few auto museums across the nation. Most museums or similar organizations, regardless of their area of focus, grew out of one person’s hobby with a supportive, encouraging and often tolerant partner. And so was the case with the Gilmore. In 1962, Donald S. Gilmore retired as the Chairman of the Board of the pharmaceutical giant, the Upjohn Company, and had previously shepherded the firm as President from 1944 to 1952. In his retirement, Donald’s wife Genevieve suggested he find a hobby.

In August of 1962, Donald joined a friend at the Pebble Beach Concours. Six months later, Donald located and purchased the auto that won its coveted Best of Show award, a stunningly restored 1913 Rolls Royce Silver Ghost Tourer. Within days of that purchase, Jane bought her husband an antique car as a birthday gift, a 1920 Pierce-Arrow “project car.” With the help of some friends, the auto was soon placed under a military style tent in the yard of their Gull Lake home and a full Pierce Arrow Restoration (Donald)restoration began.

Donald had apparently been severely bitten by the “antique car bug” and in June of 1963, he told a friend that Jane has informed him that if his “collection grows to more than 10 cars she doesn’t want them in the back yard!” Wisely keeping his collection to just nine vehicles, Donald soon purchased several acres of farm land that would one day become the current site of the Gilmore Car Museum. Two barns and a house on the property were restored, a machine shop was built, and roadways were plotted. In 1964, he built a barn-style Carriage House that would fit in with its rural surroundings to hold his collection, now approaching nearly 30 automobiles.

Gilmore Car AdDonald also began the task of preserving several historic barns, having them dismantled board-by-board, moved to the site, and re-assembled to be repurposed as display areas for his cars. Donald dubbed his new 90-acre, private oasis “The Gilmore Collection of Early American Automobiles.” In late 1964, good friend and Palm Springs neighbor Walt Disney visited the collection and by 1966 a steam tractor, steam boat, locomotive, and re-created Wright Flyer, as well as 27 additional autos, joined the Gilmore Collection.

It was Donald’s wife Jane who suggested turning the collection into a public museum where future generations could enjoy the restored cars and their stories for years to come. The Gilmore’s established a non-profit foundation and opened the museum to the public for the first time on Sunday July 31, 1966 – fifty years ago.

While the Gilmore Car Museum started out as one man’s passion 50 years ago, today the Museum is nationally recognized for its diverse collection and examples of automotive history. Long considered one of the nation’s top three auto museums and now one of the nation’s largest with over 189,000 square feet of exhibit space, aerial of gilmore 2016it is a destination that welcomes over 100,000 worldwide guests each year and continues to build the passion, love, and history of the automobile.

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San Diego Automotive Museum – San Diego, California

San Diego photo credits:  Pandora Paul

Maker Faire Features the Museum and Our New Community Partner

Mark your calendars for October 1st and 2nd at Balboa Park launches another amazing Maker Faire.   Join fascinating and curious people who enjoy learning and who love sharing what they can do.  This amazing display of innovation and resourcefulness is not to be missed!

The museum will be featuring Van Go, a special group of makers from the talented students at Washington Elementary School in Little Italy.  These clever students turn standard soap box derby cars into works of art. Three of these cars are at the museum now, and more will be built during Maker Faire.

Washington Elementary is a STEAM magnet school that focuses on science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics.  We are thrilled to have them as part of our creative museum family!

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OTHER NEWS

Catherine Workman'sDigital Technology and Blended Learning: Museums’ Role in Modern Education
Image via Pixabay by natureaddict

Museums have always been critical facets of communities and cultures, but they were once relatively static, other than the periodic rotation of exhibits and artifacts as stored items are moved to displays and vice-versa. Today, however, museums are dynamic, ever-changing, technologically advanced organizations creating immersive experiences that blur the line between the real world and the digital world. Here’s a look at how museums today create engaging experiences for all ages.

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Virtual Tours Provide Anytime, Anywhere Accessibility

Today, it’s not necessary to visit a museum in person to experience it. While an in-person visit can certainly be more impactful, digital technology makes it possible for anyone to experience museums from anywhere in the world. The Boston Children’s Museum, for example, offers an impressive virtual tour allowing anyone to explore the museum in entirety from any computer or mobile device with an internet connection.

Educators teaching in districts without nearby museums may not have opportunities to take students on field trips to experience all that museums have to offer first-hand, but they can still create learning opportunities by allowing students to explore exhibits and artifacts virtually. In fact, some educators utilize virtual tours in conjunction with other classroom lessons and activities for a multi-media learning experience.

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Workshops Create Hands-On, Engaging Experiences

Some learners best acquire knowledge through hands-on experiences. Many museums today are offering interactive, hands-on workshops for children of various age groups, creating opportunities for these kinds of experiences that can help many learners acquire and retain knowledge. Particularly when combined with verbal instruction or other educational formats to meet a variety of learning styles, real-world, hands-on experiences become a valuable tool in any educator’s toolkit.

Parents can also take advantage of workshops as early learning opportunities for their children. The Children’s Museum of Manhattan, for instance, offered a program in 2013 designed for children age two to five aimed at helping children learn about healthy living choices and the importance of adopting healthy lifestyle habits. Getting kids involved in hands-on learning opportunities like these at an early age helps them adapt to different instructional styles and readies them for formal classroom instruction.

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Apps and Interactive Games Enhance Knowledge Acquisition

Educators struggle to engage students with verbal instruction alone, but combining verbal instruction with visual aids and interactive technology generates interest and helps to motivate students to learn. Mobile apps and interactive games offered by some museums are valuable classroom tools that teachers can utilize to cultivate interest in subjects such as science, art, and more.

The Met (The Metropolitan Museum of Art) has an app as well as a fun interactive quiz, for example, and the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago offers a few different games enabling users to create virtual chemical reactions, take a tour of a beating human heart, create simple machines, and more. The proliferation of mobile technology makes it likely that in the near future, most museums will offer at least one virtual or interactive gaming experience, and many already do.

These tools are helpful for facilitating knowledge acquisition by gamifying concepts and processes. While a child may not recall how to build a simple machine following a verbal lesson, they’re certainly more likely to remember what fun they had helping the digital character “Twitch” build machines after dark in the virtual Museum of Science and Industry.

Museums have always been valuable entities in communities and society at large, drawing tourism and promoting cultural diversity. But today, museums are playing a much more integral role in education and in engaging young minds – a role that’s likely to grow in prominence in the coming years as more museums adopt the technology that makes blended, interactive experiences possible.

Catherine Workman has dreamt of traveling the globe since she was young. Now, that she’s grown she seeks out adventures across the U.S., whenever possible, and she’s currently planning a European backpacking trip. With her new site, WellnessVoyager.com, she plans to share her travel stories and hopes to encourage other young people to spread their wings.

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INQUIRIES

1914 Chautauqua Cyclecar

I’m an archivist/researcher working with a patron in upstate New York to research the history of what he thinks is a 1914 Chautauqua Cyclecar. I’m wondering if you might provide some guidance as to resources (archival collections, publications, organizations) that might yield any information about this vehicle. I’ve found some reference to the manufacturing in old issues of The Automobile. It was manufactured by a Harry J. Newman in Jamestown, NY. Thank you very much for your assistance.

Vicki Tobias, email: tobiashistoryresearch@gmail.com

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Austin Healey Sprite Mark

My name is Bob Lorenz and I’m an associate producer for the Travel Channel’s Mysteries at the Museum, a doc-style series which explores the history behind artifacts located in museums across the U.S. and Europe. We are currently in our eleventh season, and we’re developing a story about an Austrian named Heinz Meixner, who in 1963 rented a red Austin Healey Sprite Mark II, removed the windshield, and drove under the Berlin Wall with his fiancée and fiancee’s mother in the car. We are looking for a version of the car that Meixner drove – either a 1961 or 1962 (possibly even a 1963) red Austin Healey Sprite Mark II – to feature as our artifact for this segment. It is probably a long shot, but does the NAAM have one of those models in its collection? If not, would you by chance know who may have one, or would be able to point us in the right direction? I am sure you are quite busy, but any help that you can provide is greatly appreciated.

Bob Lorenz, email: bob.lorenz@optomenusa.com

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Tupelo Automobile Museum

Tupelo Automobile MuseumWe have had an inquiry to identify the car in this picture which was taken at the Donner Pass in CA many years ago. Can anyone can provide us some information about the car?

Jane Spain, Tupelo Automobile Museum, email: janes@tupeloauto.com

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NAAM E-NEWS – September 2015, Volume 17, Issue 3

September 29, 2015 in Uncategorized

NAAM E-NEWS – September 2015, Volume 17, Issue 3

In This Issue

President’s Message

By: Terry Ernest

Terry NAAM portrait CPTAs our busy season is now ending, we should look back and note what our successes were for the previous season and plan on how to exploit those successes for the future. At the Wills Sainte Claire Auto Museum, we started a fall lecture series a few years ago to attract visitors to the museum. In the past we have had speakers talk about mostly automotive topics. But in our next lecture we are going to venture a little bit away from an automotive talk and have a session about passenger excursion vessels of the early 1900’s. We know going into this different approach that we may not be targeting our normal demographic of visitors, and that is exactly what we are hoping for. We believe it will be a way of broadening our base of visitors who may not have visited us in the past because they perceived us being strictly a car museum. We hope to attract people that have an interest in passenger ships and/or local history. We think this is the ideal customer for what we are selling, so to speak; area history, and education of the locally made Wills Sainte Claire Automobile.

What this endeavor is really about is trying new things. We can’t rely on doing everything as we have in the past. Museums continue to compete for a slice of peoples time and money. Perhaps what we should be thinking about is how do we create the concept of entertainment so we evolve to stay relevant.

I suspect some museums are doing a better job at this than others. What is your museum doing to blend education with entertainment?   Share your thoughts with NAAM members on the NAAM Forum. Lets create a dialogue that can be shared with the entire group. The more you share, the more you can learn!

http://www.naam.museum/forums

MISSION STATEMENT

The National Association of Automobile Museums is a professional center of excellence for automobile museums and affiliated organizations that supports, educates and encourages members to operate according to professional standards of the museum industry.

2016 ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Make Your Hotel Reservations

A Hotel Room Block is now ready for reservations for the 2016 NAAM Conference hosted by the Seal Cove Auto Museum in Bar Harbor, Maine. Please see the information below for making reservations.  While the room block expires on April 2, 2016, our conference host recommends making reservations early since rooms are in demand during this period.

For your planning purposes, the conference starts with a Welcome Reception on Tuesday night, May 3, and concludes on Friday night, May 6, 2016, with the closing banquet and NAAMY Awards Ceremony.  The room block dates begin on Monday, 5/2/2016, to accommodate our attendees traveling from the west. Also, the hotel is extending the conference room rate for three days before and after the block for anyone who would like to visit the area.

As always, this will be another excellent professional development and networking opportunity. Conference details will be available by early 2016.

Hotel Room Block
Group Number: NAAM050316
Room Rate: $99, plus 8% room tax
Atlantic Oceanside Hotel & Conference Center

119 Eden Street
Bar Harbor, Maine 04609
Reservation Office: (800) 336-2463
Hotel: (207) 288-5801

Room Guarantee: Individual room deposits, equal to one night’s room rate, are due at the time the reservation is made. Individual deposits are refundable, less a $20 administrative fee, if cancellation notification is given 7 or more days prior to arrival date. Cancellations received with 6 or fewer days prior to arrival are subject to a fee equal to one night’s lodging.

APPLY FOR A 2016 CONFERENCE SCHOLARSHIP

Deadline: April 1, 2016

Apply Now: Each year NAAM offers scholarships to the Annual Conference to help members grow professionally through informative sessions and networking opportunities. The scholarship program is designed for museums with limited financial resources (annual budgets less than $500,000) to pay for their staff to attend the conference.

When: You can apply anytime and we encourage you to do so to take advantage of this great benefit. The deadline is April 1, 2016.

How: Please visit the NAAM website for scholarship criteria, guidelines and the online application (www.naam.museum, select Conferences, then Conference Scholarships.

MESSAGE FROM OUR SPONSOR

Hagerty Extends NAAM Official Sponsorship

As many of you know, Hagerty has been the Official Sponsor of NAAM for the past three years. We at Hagerty are proud and excited to announce that we have extended our sponsorship of NAAM through 2018! Hagerty has increased the level of financial supportas well.

Everyone at Hagerty extends their gratitude and appreciation to all NAAM members for the outstanding job you do preserving our automobile heritage and sharing that heritage with thousands, even millions of people every year who otherwise would have no chance to see and experience these wonderful vehicles.

Thank you for all that you do and we look forward to our continued partnership with NAAM!

THE NATIONAL HISTORIC VEHICLE REGISTER EXPLAINED

Hagerty is a proud sponsor of the Historic Vehicle Association (HVA). Through that sponsorship, the HVA was able to establish the National Historic Vehicle Register. If press coverage is any indication, the launch of the National Historic Vehicle Register is proving to be a hit with car guys and gals as well as the general public. So how does the Register work? What is the government’s role in the program? How does it help the community of people who love old cars? President of the Historic Vehicle Association, Mark Gessler, answers these and other important questions.

The National Historic Vehicle Register is a documentation program to record America’s automotive treasures. The National Historic Vehicle Register is designed to help record this nation’s most significant historic vehicles, preserving their information for future generations and documenting their story in perpetuity.

What is the purpose of the National Historic Vehicle Register, and how does it help the classic car community?

By officially recognizing one of the world’s greatest technological achievements, the National Historic Vehicle Register celebrates the immense impact the car has had on all aspects of life, helps spread the word about the historic significance of the automobile and provides the classic car community a platform for saving and perpetuating America’s automotive heritage. This work has already been done for important buildings, bridges and airplanes, but not the automobile.

In the architectural world, private and public organizations have formed to document and celebrate historic structures, while in the aviation world; private-public efforts have been made to create the foremost conservation labs to ensure the continuation of important planes. It is time that we come together as a group of passionate enthusiasts and create the same level of infrastructure for the nation’s automotive history.

Is this a government-run program?

The National Historic Vehicle Register is a program created and managed by the Historic Vehicle Association, a private, member-driven organization established in 2009. In 2013, the HVA initiated a collaboration with the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service and Heritage Documentation Programs to develop a framework and guidelines to document automobiles as part of the Historic American Engineering Record( HAER ), archived in the Library of Congress.

How does the Register work?

Currently, the National Historic Vehicle Register consists of vehicles curated by a group of HVA advisors. Cars are chosen by this group of experts to represent the broad and extensive impact the automobile has had on all aspects of American culture and history. Furthermore, eligibility is based on historic significance, the integrity of the vehicle and, more specifically, draft guidelines adapted from the Department of the Interior’s criteria for historic buildings, vessels and aircraft. The four criteria are:

  • association with significant events
  • association with significant persons
  • design or construction value
  • information value such as first or last produced or among the best surviving example

After cars are chosen, they are documented by the HVA to the Secretary of Interiors Standards for Heritage Documentation. This documentation includes large format photography, a written historical narrative and measured line drawings. Once the documentation is completed it is stored at the HVA to be shared with the public on a future online infrastructure. Additionally, documentation is submitted to HAER in order to be archived at the Library of Congress and made available to the general public.

What is the Historic American Engineering Recordand why is the National Historic Vehicle Register associated with it?

HAER is a documentation program formed in 1969 by the National Park Service, The American Society of Civil Engineers and the Library of Congress to Document historic sites and structures related to engineering and industry. It procures documentation of engineering artifacts with written historical reports, large-format photography and measured drawings. HAER provides an excellent framework for documenting the automobile as both HAER and its sister program HABS have effectively recorded many of America’s most important artifacts in a manner that has stood the test of time, even if the artifacts themselves have not.

Furthermore, HAER is a gateway for the Library of Congress’ Division of Prints and Photographs that allows for the widespread public distribution of documentation in a copyright free environment. It is important for the HVA and core to our mission to spread the word about the importance of the automobiles being recorded and to broadcast the significant stories to the public.

Does the government have any control over how Registered cars are used?

Absolutely not. The National Historic Vehicle Register simply documents vehicles as they are now in order to celebrate the impact particular automobiles have made on our culture and history preserving their stories for future generations enabling further research and the sharing of ideas. Cars that become part of the National Historic Vehicle Register face no mandate for future use, modification, preservation, etc. We want to take a snapshot of our country’s most significant automotive artifacts while recognizing a private owner’s rights to do what they would like with their property. If a national treasure is lost for some unfortunate reason, having the National Historic Vehicle Register documentation will ensure our automotive legacy will live on in words, photos, videos and line drawings if not in the object itself.

What level of government interference will take place with regard to these vehicles and should there be concern on the part of owners with the added level of scrutiny applied?

Again, there are no government restrictions for vehicles documented in HAER or the National Historic Vehicle Register. In fact, this is really a benefit for owners, as the documentation associated with the vehicle results in a well-researched history of the automobile.

The National Historic Vehicle Register is similar to the National Register for Historic Places, which is mired in government regulation of private homes. How is the National Historic Vehicle Register different?

While the National Historic Vehicle Register carries a similar name to the National Register for Historic Places and uses similar guidelines for recognition, the two organizations are independent. The National Historic Vehicle Register carries no restrictions for automobiles that are recognized and documented. Furthermore, while the National Register of Historic Places doesn’t mandate any restrictions on properties listed, certain tax benefits and grants, as well as local historic district laws, have been placed on historic structures that create regulations. Automobiles are not subject to these laws or local property ordnances. We are specifically working with the Heritage Documentation Programs to avoid these kinds of issues.

How is the National Historic Vehicle Register being funded? Is this a taxpayer-funded initiative?

The National Historic Vehicle Register is funded privately by the HVA. There is no burden on the taxpayer as a result of the documentation undertaken by the HVA. The HVA works with the Heritage Documentation Programs of the NPS. The HVA, its members and donors have funded all documentation work for HAER to date.

My car is historically significant, how can I get it on the Register?

The HVA is working with the U.S. Department of the Interior to refine the criteria that will be used to determine vehicle eligibility for future public submission. Please email us information about your vehicle (info@historicvehicle.org) and we will place it on our list of potential candidates for the National Historic Vehicle Register.

NEWS FROM MEMBER MUSEUMS

Gilmore Car Museum – Hickory Corners, Michigan

Ford Model A Day

Ford Model A Day Saturday, September 19, 2015 9am – 4pm Gilmore Car Museum is the proud home of the Model A Ford Museum, the world’s largest museum dedicated solely to the Model A Ford! On Sunday, September 19th, hop in your Model A and head out to the Gilmore Car Museum for the 3rd annual Ford Model A Day and celebrate the heritage of a trusty American car with friends and family. Bring your Model A or come as a spectator, this show and swap meet will be sure to please as hundreds of Model A’s gather in Hickory Corners, Michigan on the Gilmore’s Historic Campus. General Admission: $12.00 per person – children 11 & under are FREE Includes all museum exhibits at no extra charge. For more information or to register your car for Model A Ford Day, please contact the Model A Ford Foundation at fordyhorses@aol.com or visit their website, www.maffi.org.

 

Route 66 Auto Museum – Sapulpa, Oklahoma

Route66_towerA new museum featuring vintage cars, interactive exhibits and an 80-foot-tall gas pump is planned along Route 66 in Sapulpa. The Heart of Route 66 Auto Museum is currently under development at the old armory along Route 66.

The museum, which is slated for opening in early 2016, will feature vintage cars and a variety of exhibits on Route 66, including how the military used the famed road. Interactive and simulated displays as well as a gift shop and kids’ area are also planned for the 10,000-square-foot property.

A notable highlight will be a vintage-inspired gas pump, which will stand about two stories high. “There’s a lot of interest in Route 66 all over the world,” said Richard Holmes, president of the Heart of Route 66 Auto Museum, Inc., the not-for-profit organization creating the museum. “People drive along the route from Chicago to California, and we want to have artwork and displays to showcase Oklahoma’s role in the road.”

Heart of Route 66 Auto Museum, Inc., is leasing the armory from the city of Sapulpa for $1 per year. Little Mountain Productions, which remodeled the concession area for Tulsa’s BOK Center in 2014, has been hired for the museum’s interior work. A grant from the Route 66 Preservation Authority will help fund the improvements to the property.

“It will be a fun stop along the way for the whole family,” said Lina Holmes, executive director of the Heart of Route 66 Auto Museum, Inc. “There’s going to be a lot of different types of displays.”

The Heart of Route 66 Auto Museum, Inc., is currently seeking memberships. Annual memberships cost $45 for two people, while a lifetime membership is $2,500, which includes lifetime admission to the museum for two people, a plaque with a chosen name on the wall of the museum and 15 percent off purchases at the gift shop. Memberships are tax-deductible.

A sold-out kick-off celebration is scheduled for June 5 at the Signs of the Times event venue in Sapulpa. The Heart of Route 66 Auto Museum, Inc., will also have a booth at the Route 66 Blowout and car show in Sapulpa on June 6 and will raffle off a 1956 MGA race car.

The museum will be located at 13 Sahoma Lake Road in Sapulpa.

Retail News

Book for Gearheads

I just spoke with an author by the name of Jason Fogelson who has published a book called 100 Things for Every Gearhead To Do Before They Die. He asked if it would be possible to have an email sent out to all NAAM museums about his book and it being available for purchase for Museum Stores to sell. His email is Jason@fogelson.com and his website is www.booksforgearheads.com.

NAAM E-NEWS – June 2015, Volume 17, Issue 2

June 30, 2015 in Uncategorized

NAAM E-NEWS – June 2015, Volume 17, Issue 2

In This Issue

President’s Message

By: Terry Ernest

Terry NAAM portrait CPTAs I write this, we have just returned from a very successful NAAM Annual Meeting and Conference held in Warren, Ohio, and hosted by the National Packard Museum. Director Mary Ann Porinchak, ably assisted by Christine Bobco and Charles Ohlin, went out of their way to make our conference fantastic!

We had some great sessions regarding grant research, exhibit planning, social marketing and many more. Discussions about disaster planning included fire, floods and the sink-hole at the Corvette National Museum. Swarms of locusts were fortunately not included.

We also had some great tours. A tour of the secretive Delphi (formerly Packard Electric) electrical testing facility was splendid, as was a tour of the Cleveland Museum of Art. After a wonderful lunch (arranged by Mary Ann’s daughter) was a tour of the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection, conducted by Curator Derek Moore. Derek did an excellent job of showing us the collection of Cleveland based auto manufacturers and other various transportation artifacts. Our conference ended with a banquet at our host Museum, the National Packard Museum. Dining among the fabulous Packards and spending time with friends in the transportation museum industry, was particularly enjoyable.

One of the many things that I appreciate about NAAM conferences is the willingness of members to share their expertise about various matters. The museum I represent, by most any standard, is very small. But that doesn’t mean we aren’t serious about our purpose, which is to tell our unique story in a compelling manner. Learning how to do this is one of the primary reasons we joined NAAM, and why I go to the annual conference every year. I have considered that perhaps small museums like ours, gain more out of the association than do larger more established museums. However, I spoke with a director from a large museum who noted they gained a lot from this year’s conference topics , which means NAAM conferences are helpful for large museums also.

I was also delighted to see younger members of the museum community present at the conference. Automobile museums as an industry will benefit from fresh ideas and concepts that this next generation of leaders will produce.

So when it comes to NAAM’s annual conferences, what’s not to like! A fantastic tour, interesting and informative sessions and friendly people made this a superb conference. And hold onto your hats. Next year (May 2016) our Annual meeting and conference will be in Bar Harbor, Maine, hosted by Raney Bench, Director of the Seal Cove Museum. I can’t wait!

If I may be of assistance, please contact me at: willsmuseum@sbcglobal.net

MISSION STATEMENT

The National Association of Automobile Museums is a professional center of excellence for automobile museums and affiliated organizations that supports, educates and encourages members to operate according to professional standards of the museum industry.

2015 ANNUAL CONFERENCE

We sincerely thank the National Packard Museum for hosting a remarkable conference for NAAM in Warren, Ohio, from March 17 – 20, 2015. We especially thank Mary Ann Porinchak , Executive Director of the Packard Museum and her staff, Christine Bobco and Charlie Ohlin for coordinating endless details and the Packard team for their assistance in many areas.

There were 66 attendees, many for the first time, representing 44 museum entities, nine informative sessions, three tour destinations, three scholarships awarded and 23 NAAMY Awards presented.

The closing banquet included fun entertainment, and the highly-anticipated NAAMY Awards presentation by Christine Bobco, National Packard Museum. It was a delightful evening of warm conversation and delicious dining.

Thank You to Our Supporters

We extend our heartfelt appreciation to our generous sponsors, whose support helped make this conference a great success:

  • Hagerty – The Official Insurance Provider of the National Association of Automobile Museums
  • Richard H. Driehaus Trust and National Parts Depot – Generous sponsors of the NAAM Scholarship Program
  • Residence Inn – Hotel host and welcome dinner accommodations
  • Trumball County Tourism Bureau – City informational packets
  • Kent State University, Trumball Campus – Session room accommodations

NAAMY Awards

Congratulations to our 2014 NAAMY Award Winners who were recognized at the 2015 Annual Conference! Each award recognizes industry leaders for achievement, professionalism and creativity. NAAMY are designed to further promote professionalism in automotive museum managerial, curatorial, educational and promotional work.

Congratulations to the following award winners:

2014 NAAMY Award winners

Division I

Museums with budgets less than $300,000

Books and Exhibit Catalogs

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – William E. Swigart, Jr. Automobile Museum

Events and Public Promotions

3rd Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Wills Sainte Claire Auto Museum

Newsletters and Magazines

2nd Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Wills Sainte Claire Auto Museum

Website Design

2nd Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Lincoln Motor Car Heritage Museum

Division II

Museums with budgets greater than $300,000

Collateral Materials

2nd Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Antique Automobile Club of America Museum
2nd Place – Antique Automobile Club of America Museum
3rd Place – Antique Automobile Club of America Museum

Educational Programs

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame
2nd Place – National Automobile Museum (The Harrah Collection)
3rd Place – America On Wheels Museum

Events and Public Promotions

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Antique Automobile Club of America Museum
2nd Place – Antique Automobile Club of America Museum
3rd Place – Antique Automobile Club of America Museum

Film and Video

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – National Corvette Museum
3rd Place – Studebaker National Museum

Interpretive Exhibits

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Antique Automobile Club of America Museum
2nd Place – Owls Head Transportation Museum
3rd Place – Studebaker National Museum

Newsletters and Magazines

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Owls Head Transportation Museum
2nd Place – National Automobile Museum (The Harrah Collection
3rd Place – National Corvette Museum

Website Design

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Owls Head Transportation Museum
2nd Place – National Corvette Museum

2015 CONFERENCE SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

Congratulations to three NAAM members who received scholarships to attend the 2015 Annual Conference. Awards included $1,000 for travel expenses, plus complimentary conference registration. These valuable scholarships were made possible thanks to a generous sponsorship from Richard Driehaus and National Parts Depot.

NAAM is dedicated to helping its members grow professionally through informative annual conferences and networking opportunities. To fulfill this goal, NAAM offers conference scholarships each year. The scholarship program is designed for museums with limited financial resources to pay for their staff to attend.

Congratulations to our 2015 recipients:

Marjorie Cutright, Executive Director, William E. Swigart, Jr. Automobile Museum

Penny Dye, Secretary/Treasurer, Pontiac-Oakland Museum & Resource Center, Inc.

Vreni Fernandez, PR & Marketing, Kansas City Automotive Museum, Inc.

2016 ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Make Your Hotel Reservations

A Hotel Room Block is now ready for reservations for the 2016 NAAM Conference hosted by the Seal Cove Auto Museum in Bar Harbor, Maine. Please see the information below for making reservations. While the room block expires on April 2, 2016, our conference host recommends making reservations early since rooms are in demand during this period.

For your planning purposes, the conference starts with a Welcome Reception on Tuesday night, May 3, and concludes on Friday night, May 6, 2016, with the closing banquet and NAAMY Awards Ceremony. The room block dates begin on Monday, 5/2/2016, to accommodate our attendees traveling from the west. Also, the hotel is extending the conference room rate for three days before and after the block for anyone who would like to visit the area.

As always, this will be another excellent professional development and networking opportunity. Conference details will be available by early 2016.

Hotel Room Block

Group Number: NAAM050316
Room Rate: $99, plus 8% room tax
Atlantic Oceanside Hotel & Conference Center

119 Eden Street
Bar Harbor, Maine 04609

Reservation Office: (800) 336-2463
Hotel: (207) 288-5801

Room Guarantee: Individual room deposits, equal to one night’s room rate, are due at the time the reservation is made. Individual deposits are refundable, less a $20 administrative fee, if cancellation notification is given 7 or more days prior to arrival date. Cancellations received with 6 or fewer days prior to arrival are subject to a fee equal to one night’s lodging.

CURATIONAL NEWS

Curators Engage Guests

Aaron Warkentin

Curator of Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum

As curators of automobile museums, we have a duty to engage our guests in telling relevant stories that express the significance of our museums’ missions. We at the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum must highlight the historical, social, and technological significance of the Auburn, Cord and Duesenberg automobiles through exhibitory signage. Our great curatorial conundrum is to write signage that can be understood by a wide variety of people. In this article, I will discuss two issues that curators struggle with and how my staff and I resolved these issues in our museum’s newly renovated Raisbeck Engineering Hall of Technology.

In the renovation of our Hall of Technology, we encountered two major hurdles in communicating the technical and mechanical aspects of an automobile to the changing demographic of our guests: 1) creating effective and clearly understood signage, and 2) the difficulty of illustrating, through both 2D images and 3D objects, the operation of various mechanical components. Previously the automotive hobbyist, as well as the mechanically-minded individuals were our main visitorship. This has changed to those who have an interest in the automobile and its history but lack the mechanical knowledge. The critical consideration in developing any signage or interactive was our guests’ interests and knowledge of the mechanical working of the automobile. It has been our experience that our guests’ technical knowledge ranges from nearly zero to expert level.

Initially, we had designed signs with diagrams, technical images and a lot of text, providing in-depth explanations of the mechanical devices and technical innovations developed by the Auburn Automobile Company (AAC) and Duesenberg, Inc. How would we provide a base knowledge on how an automobile functioned to those who did not possess the background? Without that base knowledge one can become easily confused by the technical information and quickly become indifferent or disinterested in the exhibit.

Each of the 21 signs went through an average of six edits and proofreads. The text on the final versions was pared down to only one-third of the original word count. This required the involvement of all four curatorial staff members. We constantly asked ourselves upon each edit, “Are we explaining the subject with a reasonable degree of simplicity?” “Are we creating more questions than answers?” “Are we introducing ideas that do not directly relate to the subject we are writing about?” It was a difficult and painstakingly long process, but well worth the effort.

We included biographies of AAC and Duesenberg, Inc. engineers along with their technical innovations used in their production of cars. With these signs we again asked ourselves, “How can we create connections between the man and the machine?” We decided that on the same sign we would place the biography of each engineer above the technical innovation he developed. This provides a human connection to the mechanical device they created. For example, we have displayed an Auburn supercharger modified by August Duesenberg. Directly to the right is a sign with a biography of August and a description how a supercharger operates.

Every sign relates to the artifacts in the display cases, the interactives and the other signage in the Hall of Technology. By the linking of images, text and ideas, the guest receives a fuller understanding of how Auburn, Cord and Duesenberg technical innovations have affected the wider automotive world, both in the past and present to the widest audience.

How were we to illustrate the operation of an engine using 2D and 3D artifacts? We recognize that people learn by doing, so we included two physical interactives and one digital interactive. We incorporated a Cord V-8 engine with a steering wheel attached. Guests can turn the engine camshaft and see the actuation of the valve train. The sign for the Cord engine includes a description of its unique valve train design and the guest learns how this component is important to the operation of the engine.

Through the assistance of a local automotive parts manufacturer and a local university, we were able to develop and enhance our low cost interactives. Working with a local university, we were able to take advantage of their Information Technology expertise to enhance an existing display, a Cord automobile chassis. A university student worked with our touchscreen software provider to create an touchscreen which illuminates various parts on the actual chassis. The visitor can now learn how the car components work while identifying them on a real automobile.

We also changed the physical layout of the exhibit hall to create a more open and welcoming space for our guests. Simply dividing in half the freestanding wall, which had been used for signage display, made a dramatic improvement to the space. Fresh paint in warmer tones helped to make the room more inviting. We also rearranged a display of several large engines, which had been lined up along one wall. By pulling out the engines and spacing them so that the guests could walk around them, we encouraged visitors to stop and examine them in conjunction with its related signage, rather than to hurry past.

Through thoughtful interpretation, we can make our automotive subject matter, which is intimidating or even boring to some, both accessible and engaging. The key is to view your exhibitry through the eyes of your least initiated visitor. Yes, it takes a lot of effort, but your creative interpretation may well motivate the next generation to preserve our history.

NEWS FROM MEMBER MUSEUMS

Gilmore Car Museum – Hickory Corners, Michigan

A KIA Summer Photography Workshop,
“Chrome and Metal Detroit style at the
Gilmore Car Museum” was offered in June 2015
.

Organized by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, attendees enjoyed taking photographs of America’s classic dreamboats of the open road at the Gilmore Car Museum with automotive industry photo professional, Jim Secreto. Participants photographed a selection of cars from the museum’s collection alongside Jim, learning about how best to capture the classic beauties using morning and evening light, angle of view and equipment choice. As a special bonus, GCM members registered at the KIA member rate for this class!

Model A Ford Museum – Hickory Corners, Michigan

The Model A Ford Museum was constructed in 2012 and opened one year later at the

Gilmore CAR Museum Campus in Hickory Corners, Michigan. The theme of our Museum is “A Stroll Through the Model A Years”. The museum’s interior is designed to display the many body styles of the Model A, year by year. Other displays include historical, political and economic events that occurred during a tumultuous period.

The vehicles used to carry out this theme begins with a Model T Ford, and then show the new Model A styles to meet competition between 1928 and 1931:Roadsters, Coupes, Sedans, and Deluxe Phaetons. Special exhibits include a miniature assembly plant, the School Bus and Schoolroom, a Postal truck and a Tow truck. Other uses of the Model A engines include how amateur pilots used the Model A engine to fly the Pietenpole airplane, with the engine mounted backward. The Model A Ford Foundation, Inc (MAFFI) is the umbrella for the Model A Community which designed and built a replica of a 1929 Ford dealership, featuring a salesroom and authentic parts department.

San Diego Automotive Museum – San Diego, California

Thanks to the wonderful local collectors, Camp Pendleton, the MCRD Museum, and the Veteran’s Museum, we are able to produce an amazing display of vehicles and memorabilia that highlight an important chapter of San Diego history, Balboa Park, the War Years. Active and retired military will be admitted free during the run of this exhibit. We are also working in collaboration with the Veteran’s Museum in Balboa Park.  Show your ticket receipt from our museum at the Veteran’s Museum, and you will be admitted free!

 Exhibit News

41 Old Hubcaps Becomes International Art Initial Collection.

 Wilkes-Barre, PA (October 21, 2014) – In 2008, Ken Marquis, a Pennsylvania picture framer, had an epiphany while milling around an automobile show. “I started rushing up and down vendor aisles buying old hub caps. I bought 41 rusted old hub caps that day. My friend thought I was crazy. I said ‘I have an idea’.”

Marquis’ idea has led to the largest non-profit international art initiative of its kind, The Landfillart Project. ( www.landfillart.org) 1,041 hubcap “metal and plastic canvasses” are now 1,041 exceptional works of art — kindling a powerful message of sustainable, green living and the transformative power of Art.

Landfillart’s new mission is to create an exclusive long-term partnership with a company to curate and manage in perpetuity this unique art collection.

The Landfillart’s hubcap origins are well branded for the automobile industry. The selected organization will curate in perpetuity the Landfillart collection – 1041 individual works of art – to share with audiences around the world – receive perpetual naming rights, and benefit from the marketing opportunities of the over 1000 artists’ stories behind each work of art. Profit sharing of exhibition sponsorships, companion book sales, and other merchandising is also negotiable.

Museums and companies seeking more information on the Landfillart Project partnerships can email: chriscom@epix.net, and visit: www.landfillart.org.

1041 artists from every state in the U.S. and 52 countries – places like Austria, Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, and Denmark among many other nations – have re-claimed a discarded hubcap. The range of contributing artists is hard to characterize. They encompass every age and ethnicity and also include disabled veterans, at-risk youth, persons with special needs, and Native Americans.

On June 1, 2011, an international wire service news story broke to over 1000 major print, television, radio, and digital news organizations announcing Landfillart.

One year later, this art collection was selected by the Museum of Shenandoah Valley which launched Landfillart’s first-ever public opening, “Second Time Around: The Hubcap as Art,” in September, 2014. (themsv.org.) “Second Time Around” opened to record crowds in its first week and will be on display through March 2015.

Retail News

Eurographics

Eurographics is a jigsaw puzzle wholesaler who offer numerous automobile related images which would make a fine addition to your museum gift shops. Their puzzles are made in the USA with blue-board, which is the highest quality in the puzzle industry, a perfect fit for high end museum shops.

The images available include cars of the 1930s, 1940s, 1950s and 1960s. Also they have images of vintage Mustangs, Corvettes, Camaros, and vintage pickup trucks from Chevy and Ford.  You may view the images on their website, www.eurographics.ca. You may contact their Sales Manager, Joe Fink, directly at 520-429-5050.  He will be happy to provide you with samples or any additional information you may need.

Automobile Quarterly Magazine

Almost 40 years ago, I started a subscription for Automobile Quarterly Magazine. AQ was published 4 times a year.  It is a hard bound book, usually around 130 pages, free of advertising.  It was supported entirely by subscription dues.

Almost immediately I began to purchase available back issues from AQ.  Finally I backfilled my collection with around a half dozen used issues, but all in very fine or excellent condition.

The collection consist of:
51 complete volumes, each containing 4 hard bound books (total of 204 books)
The last issue number 52-1
52 slipcases, one for each Volume of 4 issues
9 indexes (same style hard bound book) covering Volumes 1 – 20
Index for Issues 21 – 40
Personal Planners for 2005 and 2006.

In all there are a total of 217 books and about 55 slipcases, when AQ ceased publishing (death of the publisher).

The final price of the AQ issue was $29.95 each and slipcases were $16.95 each. Therefore the estimated value of the collection is approximately $7,300.00. I am open to any suggestions for disposing of the entire collection; from a discounted sale to an outright gift.

Richard A. Hiteshew
611 Oak Hill Road
Catonsville, MD 21228
410-788-8811 (office)
410-744-4440 (home)
Rhiteshew@gmail.com


NAAM E-NEWS – October 2014, Volume 16, Issue 4

October 22, 2014 in Uncategorized

NAAM E-NEWS – October 2014, Volume 16, Issue 4

In This Issue

  • President’s Message
  • Mission Statement   Same as last issue
  • Job Opportunity with NAAM
  • Why You Should Join the American Alliance of Museums
  • Curatorial News
  • News from Member Museums  Same layout as last issue, new info
  • Board of Directors
  • NAAM E-News Contact
  • Classified Ad Notice
  • Membership Application
    <br/>

President’s Message

By: Terry Ernest

Along with my duties at the Wills Sainte Claire Auto Museum, I belong to a lot of car clubs. The common theme that I hear discussed at many meetings is “how do we get young people interested in our hobby?”

One club that never seems to have a shortage of young people is the antique fire engine club, SPAAMFAA (SOCIETY for the PRESERVATION & APPRECIATION of ANTIQUE MOTOR FIRE APPARATUS in AMERICA). Whenever I attend their outings, there is an abundance of kids (on up to the young-at-heart) involved and at their activities. So how do they do it? Perhaps it is part of their culture to be open to children/youth to the point that they are not only accepted at activities, but openly welcome. They are encouraged to participate with their parents by riding on the trucks, waving flags in parades, participating in games, etc. What I don’t often hear at fire truck musters is: “Don’t touch that!” When we look at this from a museum’s standpoint this is certainly a challenge as curators would not appreciate every visitor touching items in the collection that would certainly damage them over time and repeated contact. So this begs the question: “How do we, the member museums of NAAM, create and foster youth interaction now so that they will become active patrons in the future?”

The answer is that there is not any single solution to this problem. However, I suspect that within the talented membership of NAAM there exist many answers. Answers that would benefit your museum. So how do we get all these solutions? By sharing our cumulative information on the NAAM website Forum. Here we can list what your museum is doing to stimulate children to be active participants and glean information to make your programs better. What are you doing currently to encourage the younger audience to enjoy their visit and want to return? Whether your program can be described in a few words or many, please share it with your fellow members. I have created a place to post your info on the NAAM website Forum at: http://www.naam.museum/forums/topic/what-are-you-doing-to-encourage-younger-visitors/

Please share your information and read what your fellow museums are doing to stimulate the next generation of visitors.

If I may be of assistance, please contact me at: willsmuseum@sbcglobal.net

MISSION STATEMENT

The National Association of Automobile Museums is a professional center of excellence for automobile museums and affiliated organizations that supports, educates and encourages members to operate according to professional standards of the museum industry.

JOB OPPORTUNITY WITH NAAM

NAAM Seeks Administrative Assistant

NAAM has an opening for a contracted, part-time administrative assistant who will be responsible for developing and implementing a variety of administrative tasks.  This will be an ideal position for someone who has excellent administrative skills and an outgoing, promotional aptitude.  It will be necessary to work independently, as well as in committee and board situations.  Please see the attached job description and email a resume to NAAM President, Terry Ernest:  ternest@sbcglobal.net
CLICK HERE FOR THE JOB DESCRIPTION

Why You Should Join the American Alliance of Museums

By Judith Endelman
Treasurer of NAAM

The glow of conversation, collegiality and comradeship of the recent NAAM annual meeting is still a warm memory when your board chair approaches you with a great idea. To make your museum more attractive to young families, a local donor wants to help you open a petting zoo right inside the galleries, using some of the old cars as homes for the cute, furry animals he is going to provide to the museum.   He figures that the revenue from selling bags of feeding pellets, photo ops, and the babies the animals will start producing should add a substantial amount to your bottom line. Of course, there might be some additional expenses to support the program, but you can figure that out later. [ READ MORE ]

You try not to panic as your mind starts racing, but who are you gonna’ call? If you were a member of the American Alliance of Museums (AAM), the answer would be obvious. You would run, not walk, to your computer and log in to the Resource Library on AAM’s website (aam-us.org). Once there, you would start marshaling your arguments against the petting zoo by looking through the information on Collections Stewardship, Facilities and Risk Management, Financial Standards, and Governance (maybe that chairman needs to go, or just get some museum management education). You should definitely download a copy of National Standards and Best Practices for U.S. Museums for him (free for AAM members).

Hopefully, your NAAM colleagues who belong to AAM (there are 25 of them) have never faced a proposal for a petting zoo, but they have turned to AAM for help solving lots of other problems.

Here are some examples of why AAM members don’t see how they could get through the day without having access to AAM’s resources:

“The AAM website is the first place I go when I’m facing a potential ethical issue, a collection management quandary or some other puzzle I’m trying to solve.”

“With a goal of becoming an accredited museum someday, we are always focused on museum best practices. The AAM website is our “go to” resource when we are making changes and implementing new procedures.”

As Mary Ann Porinchak, executive director of the National Packard Museum and NAAM president-elect commented, “I don’t know how I managed so many years without an AAM membership.”

See what Mary Ann means. Find that letter you got from AAM a few months ago (or go to aam-us.org/membership) and join today.

CURATORIAL NEWS


Know When to Run: A Case Study in Returning a Collection Car to Operation

As we all know, there is a lively and continuing debate on the subject of operating collection vehicles. On one hand, operation is an inherently damaging process that wears original fabric. On the other hand, an operating automobile is a multi-sensory experience more engaging to the visitor than a static display. Operating a collection car is a large commitment of time and resources. But stationary vehicles have their own maintenance needs, and sitting still causes its own wear. There is no easy or universal answer to the question, which explains its persistence.

In the winter and spring of 2014, staff and volunteers at The Henry Ford returned a 1905 Franklin Type A runabout to operating condition for our annual Old Car Festival. While our project won’t settle the debate, it may provide a useful model.

We have 260 cars in our collection. We do not operate every one – or even a significant portion of them. Resources are limited, and some cars are simply too precious to drive. So how do we decide what to run? We look for two things: 1.) Something that underwent a pervious restoration (the heavier the better), and 2.) Something out of the ordinary.

Generally, restored cars already have had many of their original components removed and replaced. We are not violating original fabric or destroying a period document in the course of our work. When the car is unusual, we offer something special for our guests and gain more value from our efforts. For example, we get as many as 200 Ford Model A participants at Old Car Festival. We wouldn’t gain much in adding a museum A to the mix.

The 1905 Franklin was an ideal candidate. The donor performed a thorough restoration in the 1950s, and we generally have fewer than ten Franklins at our event. Furthermore, the air-cooled engine is a technical novelty that sparks visitors’ curiosity. While our Franklin hadn’t been operated in many years, it had been properly de-commissioned and kept in a safe climate. Even though Franklin was never a major seller, it’s far from obscure. The marque has an enthusiast club that produces a robust newsletter and preserves vintage catalogs and manuals. (Indeed, the H.H. Franklin Club was vitally – and eagerly – cooperative in our project. Many thanks to its members!)

The work itself was as trouble-free as we could hope. The tires needed replacement, a valve job was necessary, and the unusual vacuum oiling system required some experimentation but, beyond that, all was smooth. Our dedicated volunteer team, largely working one day a week, had the car up and running within four months. The Franklin performed flawlessly at Old Car Festival and was the centerpiece of a well-received presentation for our visitors.

We’ll probably never reach complete consensus on whether to run historic automobiles. But if we are thoughtful in selecting the cars we do operate, then we can strike a compromise that provides considerable benefit to our visitors with minimal detriment to our artifacts.

DO YOU HAVE NEWS?

We want to hear from you.

Please share news about your museum with the NAAM E-News editor. It’s time to double check to make sure Kristy Ketterman, kristy.ketterman@gmail.com, has been added to your museum’s distribution lists for news releases, e-news, and member and media announcements.  Many automobile museums are members of NAAM, but little information is received for our newsletter.  Thanks for helping ensure NAAM E-News is informative and up-to-date about the latest activities of our members.

NEWS FROM MEMBER MUSEUMS

AACA Museum – Hershey, Penn.

The Cammack Tucker collection is being housed permanently in a dedicated 5,200 square foot gallery in the AACA Museum that will not only showcase the cars themselves, but will also chronicle Preston Tucker’s life and history before and after the fabled Tucker ’48. The “Night at the Museum” event on October 8 introduced Phase 1 of the exhibit, as despite all attempts, the necessary funds to construct all of the original design elements have not been raised at this time. The AACA Museum seeks to continue raising funds to provide additional interactive elements to enhance the exhibit over time.
“The AACA Museum intended from the very start of the design discussion that we would educate our guests about Tucker’s process and determination to create something special,” stated Lizewskie. “We listened carefully to input David Cammack and his family provided us, and we were quite pleased to learn that it mirrored our vision. The end result needed to be something that would complement our stunning displays that are already through the Museum. Being a permanent display, we knew the Cammack Tucker Gallery had to be fantastic right from the start.”

Preston Tucker’s family, including grandson John Jr. and great-grandsons Mike and Sean Tucker, has also endorsed the project, expressing their willingness to act as historical advisors. Sean Tucker was elated to be a crucial part of the exhibit. “The effort being put forth by the AACA team in the presentation of the Cammack Tucker collection is not only an honor to the tucker family but also to the man who had an amazing passion to preserve the history of the Tucker story”, exclaimed Sean Tucker. “As a member of the Tucker family it is truly a privilege to serve as a Historical Advisor to this exciting endeavor.
Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum – Auburn, Ind.Cord Model_auburn

The Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum is thrilled to announce the newest acquisition to its collection, a Cord L-29 scale model.  The model was donated to the museum by Errett Lobban Cord’s grandson, Charles E. Cord, II. Mr. Cord’s idea for a low-slung, front-drive car came alive in the Cord L-29 automobile, for which production began in 1929.  This beautifully constructed scale model of the car was made by Elgin National Watch Company and was given as a gift to E. L. Cord by Auburn Automobile Company factory and administrative workers.  The museum is pleased to add this rare object to its collection.  It will help to tell the story of the Cord L-29 automobile and the people that created it.
British Transportation Museum – Dayton, Ohio

Thrilled to be part of the Triumph Register of American (TRA) National Meet at Deer Creek State Park in Mount Sterling, Ohio, the British Transportation Museum (BTM) sponsored the Participant’s Choice Best of Show Award and displayed a 1960 Peerless GT. Based in Dayton, Ohio, the BTM is operated by President, Peter Stroble, and Vice President, Mike Barton. Both journeyed to Deer Creek State Park to showcase the Museum’s 1960 Peerless GT with a Triumph engine and transmission.

Cadillac & LaSalle Club Museum – West Bloomfield, Mich.

The Cadillac & LaSalle Club (CLC) has found a new permanent location for its museum and research center as part of the campus at the Gilmore Museum in Hickory Corners, Michigan. The facility’s grand opening event was held on September 28, marking the culmination of the weekend’s Cadillac Fall Festival. [ READ MORE ]

The new facility will take on the exterior look of a contemporary Cadillac dealership and will serve as a showcase for the museum’s collections, exhibits and other artifacts. At an initial size of 10,000 square feet, the building will offer ample display room for the museum’s assemblage of historically significant Cadillac and La Salle models (which stretch from 1903 to 2003), as well as a fully equipped auto prep garage. With the ability to expand the facility up to 23,000 square feet, future expansion should not pose any issues.
California Automobile Museum – Sacramento, Calif.

The California Automobile Museum is pleased to announce its first People-to-People Trip to Cuba. This 9 day/8 night travel experience will be a unique blend of Cuban cars and culture. It is estimated that Cuba has approximately 60,000 classic American cars still in working condition and participants will meet with the owners of these cars to understand the level of ingenuity required to maintain these automotive treasures. This is a special opportunity to experience this island lost in time while exchanging thoughts and ideas with the Cuban people.

For more complete information, please see the California Automobile Museum Events Page
Historic Electric Vehicle Foundation – Kingman, Ariz.

The Historic Electric Vehicle Foundation (HEVF) opened its first International Electric Vehicle Museum in Kingman, Ariz. on August 15 in conjunction with the Route 66 International Festival being held there. The theme for this year’s festival was ‘The Crossroads of the Past and the Future’. At the three day opening, the museum was visited by people from 28 states and 20 countries making it a truly international event. The name chosen for HEVF’s very first electric vehicle (EV) museum, the only one in the world solely dedicated to electric vehicles, was the ‘Route 66 Electric Vehicle Museum’.
Le-May – America’s Car Museum – Tacoma, Wash.
lemay

Just in time for Halloween, America’s Car Museum will have on display for the month of October the Fobes “Tomb for Two”. Just as the The Munster Koach was the Munster’s family touring car and The Dragula was Grandpa Munster’s race car, the “Tomb for Two” is creator Mike Fobes’ interpretation of the Munsters’ family sports car. The Dragula and the Munster Koach were creations by famed automotive customizer George Barris for the 1960s TV show, “The Munsters”. The “Tomb for Two” is a car Mike says that “Herman and Lilly could drive on a moonlit night together, past the corn fields, the crematoriums and the graveyards…all the romantic stuff”. [ READ MORE ]

The “Tomb for Two” is powered by a Clevor 302 and C4 Transmission. The Custom Coachwork was created from two real steel coffins (new, not used, yet). True to the vintage hot-rod ethic, the mechanical fuel injection system is straight out of the world of dragsters. The chassis is custom-welded utilizing a 1926 Ford Model-T suicide (what else?) front end. The baffled pipe-organ exhausts further set the tone. If you look closely, you will see that the passenger coffin is signed by George Barris himself. Throughout “Tomb for Two” you will find spider webs, skulls and other creepy details. The skull lamp low beams shine through the mouth of the skulls and the high beams shine through the eyes. The car has been featured in many publications; most recently it was a “Heavy Metal Affliction” feature car in X-Box Forza Motorsports.

Mike Fobes is a master builder, fabricator and mechanic. He is a married father of two from Auburn, Washington who holds seven Master credentials from ASE and has earned more than 50 certifications. He is in the Automotive Hall of Fame in Detroit. Currently, when he’s not working in his shop, he is an instructor at Renton Technical College, in Renton, Wash.

National Corvette Museum – Bowling Green, Ky.

The National Corvette Museum opened a 186-acre motorsports facility directly across Interstate 65 from the Museum in August. The facility consists of a 3.15 mile road course which can be arranged into four different configurations as well as a 22-acre autocross / skidpad / paddock area. Plans for 2015 include a pavilion/concession area with day garages and control tower with classrooms, meeting space and offices.  The facility offers high performance drivers’ education, rentals to all makes and models of automotive groups for racing, corporate hospitality, manufacturers testing, emergency vehicles drivers training and more.  Visit www.motorsportspark.org to learn more.

NHRA Motorsports Museum – Pomona, Calif.

The NHRA Motorsports Museum recently opened their new Chrisman Brinker Gallery of Speed which will be dedicated to Art Chrisman on November 15 during the 50th NHRA Auto Club Finals at the historic Auto Club Raceway adjacent to the Museum.

The Museum also recently held their 2nd Annual New England Hot Rod Reunion presented by AAA Insurance at the historic New England Dragway in Epping, N.H. The event was quite successful and featured three days of nostalgic drag racing, displays of vintage race cars, hot rods and classic cars, a vintage speed parts swap meet and a reception honoring our Grand Marshal and other honorees.

On October 23, the Museum is hosting the Annual California Hot Rod Reunion presented by Automobile Club of Southern California.

Pontiac-Oakland Museum – Pontiac, Ill.
PontiacShow2014c

The Pontiac-Oakland Museum just held their 3rd annual All Pontiac Cruise & Show on September 20-21 with help from club members of the GTO Association of America. This event, with the help of the GTOAA and the City of Pontiac has really grown and is taking on its own unique personality. Held on the third weekend of every September, it has become a great way to get Pontiac fans to the museum and has turned into a major fundraiser for the Museum. [ READ MORE ]

Saturday began with a tour of the museum shop/garage, old gas stations and a private collection. Later, Bill Porter, former chief designer of the Pontiac Design Studio spoke, followed by a catered meal and a performance by the Vermillion Players.

On Sunday the entire downtown was blocked off as the Museum, located right on the square became the center of all the activities. There were 225 Pontiacs of all vintages and models on display. In addition to the downtown restaurants, the Museum sold pizza and soda under a tent, had a 50/50, raffled a beautiful Chief Pontiac stained glass piece and had a commemorative card for our special guest speaker to sign, all to raise money for the Museum. The gift shop was busy all weekend, with steady business all day Sunday.

Seal Cove Auto Museum (spooky days photo) – Seal Cove, Maine
SpookyDays2013_30

The Seal Cove Auto Museum will be celebrating Halloween in style for an entire week at the end of October with a special “Spooky” exhibit of ghouls and goblins creeping around the unique collection of rare Brass Era cars and motorcycles. The event will also celebrate the closing of a very successful season premiering the new “Motoring Into the 20th Century” exhibit, which explores the rapid industrial and cultural growth that occurred at the dawn of the 20th century and role in which the auto industry played in that change. The celebrations will open with a Haunted House on the evening of October 24, and throughout the following week there will be guided tours, tasty treats, terrifying trimmings, ghoulish games, grab-bags for kids in costume and more.

Swigart Museum – Huntington, Penn.

The 2014 season has been a busy and exciting one for the William E. Swigart, Jr. Automobile Museum, located three miles East of Huntington, Penn.

A pre-season “Open House” for Museum members to see the upgrades and new displays put in place over the off-season months was held on May 4 and kicked off the 2014 season with enthusiasm. The official opening of the season began May 24, with the Memorial Day weekend celebration. In addition to its regular daily hours of operation, the Swigart Museum offered many special events and activities. [ READ MORE ]

New this year, the Museum has been the host site for a “Kars and Koffee” gathering on Saturday mornings. Owners of antique, classic, muscle and other older vehicles gather for coffee and conversation and to show off their automobile “jewels”. The weekly event draws vehicles from the central Pennsylvania area and each gathering lasts approximately two hours. The Museum has made many new friends through these informal get-togethers.

For the third consecutive year, from May 24 through September 1, the Swigart Museum was a proud participant in the Blue Star Museums program for active-duty military and their family members.

In June, the Museum hosted the Tucker Automobile Club’s national convention and served as convention headquarters. During the three-day event, attendees, in addition to seeing “up close and personal” the Museum’s two Tuckers – the 1947 Tucker Prototype, “Tin Goose,” and the 1948 Tucker #1013 – and the other “stars” in the Museum collection, they also toured the private car collection of a Museum member in Huntingdon; visited Isett Acres Heritage Museum; also in Huntingdon; drove to Penns Cave, America’s only all-water cavern, and Wildlife Park; and enjoyed a dinner cruise on Raystown Lake.

From a 1908 Brush Runabout to a 1999 Plymouth Prowler, the 45th Swigart Museum Meet, held August 8-10, was the gathering place for many, various makes and types of beautiful cars. Ones of the special attractions was Jennerstown Speedway’s race car simulator. The Chevrolet race car was equipped with a computer similar so that “drivers” could get behind the wheel of a race car and, through the simulator, experience driving laps in a race. The Meet concluded with a dinner cruise on Raystown Lake.

Wheels O’ Time Museum – Dunlap, Ill.
wheelsOtime

We have heard some grim stories about auto museums lately, from cars falling into a sink hole and an arsonist setting a fire.  The Wheels O’ Time Museum has a funny story for you.  [ READ MORE ]

To set the stage: to the south of the museum is a Beverly Hills type of two story dental clinic.  To get to it one must turn off the four lane highway in front and take a frontage road that circles the museum property 270 degrees; Not an obvious route for many dental patients in pain. On the south side of the property adjacent to the frontage road there is several hundred feet of railroad track where sits their one hundred year plus train.  When the Museum is open, a railroad crossing signal flashes a red warning light in the parking lot.

Recently a dentist from the clinic was visiting the museum with his family.  He told Museum staff about a telephone call from one of his patients worried that he was going to be late to his appointment because of being delayed by the train and wanted to know when it was going to leave.  The things you hear…
Wisconsin Auto Museum – Hartford, Wisc.
IMG_0218

The Wisconsin Automotive Museum brought back two awards from the Milwaukee Masterpiece Concours d’Elegance held at Veteran’s Park on the lakefront. Their automotive entry of a 1923 Kissel Phaeton received an Award of Excellence and the museum staff received an Auto Chic award for best coordination of apparel and automobile.

The Milwaukee Masterpiece Concours d’Elegance is an invitation only event celebrating its 10th anniversary this year. Nearly 250 cars from across the country participated in the show with proceeds going to area charities. [ READ MORE ]

Two other automobiles on exhibit at the museum were invited to the show and also won awards. The 1914 Kissel Semi – Racer and 1937 Peugeot each won their respective class. These cars had been award winners in a previous year and were invited back to compete in the anniversary show.

The high caliber Kissel automobiles were manufactured in Hartford 1906 – 1931, making Kissel the second longest car manufacturer in Wisconsin. The Wisconsin Automotive Museum currently has 110 vehicles on exhibit including 25 of the fewer than 200 remaining Kissels.

NAAM Past President Jackie Frady Receives National Honor

The American Business Women’s Association (ABWA) recently named Jackie Frady, president and executive director of the National Automobile Museum (The Harrah Collection), one of its 2015 Top Ten Business Women. ABWA takes recognition to a national level with the prestigious Top Ten Business Women of ABWA program. Top Ten is the highest honor awarded to a member. These women are applauded for their career accomplishments, community involvement and, of course, their contribution to ABWA. The Top Ten represent the best of ABWA and they will be honored at the 2014 National Women’s Leadership Conference.

“Top ten candidates are a paradigm for ABWA members who strive for excellence in their careers, their communities and in the Association,” said Rene Street, executive director of ABWA.

Frady has been actively involved with ABWA since 1986 and currently serves as president of the Reno Tahoe Express Network – a local league of ABWA. The organization continually evolves to remain relevant for today’s business woman and has significantly impacted her career.

“My management and leadership skills soared, my credentials grew and my resume expanded through ABWA,” said Frady. “Most significantly, ABWA has fueled my need for lifelong learning and professional growth through the exceptional ABWA-KU MBA essentials program offered through annual National Women’s Leadership Conferences.”

Frady’s career in the collector car field began in 1981 with the former Harrah’s Automobile Collection. Following a progression of management positions, she was promoted to executive director of the National Automobile Museum in 1992 and in 2012 was elected president of the museum’s 501(c)(3) corporation. Under her leadership, the museum has been self-sustaining since 1993, she has been credited with creating a public awareness campaign that helped lead to retirement of the museum’s construction debt and has been recognized as a leader in the automobile museum industry.

In 2012, under Frady’s leadership, the museum was named “One of America’s Five Greatest Automobile Museums” by AutoWeek magazine. Previously, it had been listed among the 10 best in the U.S. and 16 best in the world. The museum also received the Reno-Sparks Chamber of Commerce award for Non-Profit Excellence in Commerce, honoring business growth and commitment in the Reno-Sparks community. Further, the museum has won several awards at the annual awards competition of the National Association of Automobile Museums including in the categories for education, interpretive exhibits, newsletters and magazines, and marketing. Tthe Museum’s Precious Metal magazine, of which Frady is the editor and primary contributing writer, won a 2014 NAAMY Award of Excellence earning a perfect score.

Under Frady’s leadership, the Museum has implemented a prominent educational program – a series of multi-day history symposiums – funded by grants from Nevada Humanities, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanties. The series, approved by the Nevada Department of Education, allows teachers to receive in-service credit. Additionally, Frady helped author and edit two books published by the museum, a coffee table book Against All Odd, about the 1908 New York to Paris Auto Race and a soft-bound souvenir book about the museum’s history and its collection. She produced a short film, The Bill Harrah Story and the Legendary Journey to the Museum, in conjunction with KNPB Television, Reno’s Public Broadcasting Station.

This year marked her 19th year as an honorary judge at the prestigious Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, one of only a couple of women to serve in this capacity.  The Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance honorary judges are preeminent in the “Who’s Who” of the world-wide automotive industry.

Additionally, Frady has been actively involved with the National Association of Automobile Museums (NAAM) since its inception in 1994. NAAM is the professional center of excellence for automobile museums across the nation that supports, educates and encourages members to operate according to professional standards of the museum industry. She served as President several times, and most recently for three consecutive terms, 2012-2014.

Frady’s 30-year career in the collector car field was celebrated in 2011 by Reno Magazine in a cover story, “Driven to Success” and in a “Captains of Industry” feature by the Reno Gazette-Journal. In 2012, Frady was featured on KTVN in “Someone 2 Know,” which recapped her career and influence as a leader and professional and as a woman who helped pave the way for other ladies in an industry once driven by men. In 2013, she received the prestigious Silver Thistle Award as the 2013 Scot of the Year by the Nevada Society of Scottish Clans at its 32nd Annual Robert Burns Celebration. The award recognizes an American of Scottish ancestry for outstanding service in the Northern Nevada or Northeast California communities in business, medicine, education, fine arts or philanthropy.

 

NAAM E-NEWS – June 2014, Volume 16, Issue 2

May 25, 2014 in Newsletter, Uncategorized

NAAM E-NEWS – June 2014, Volume 16, Issue 2

In This Issue

  • President’s Message
  • Mission Statement   
  • 2014 Annual Conference 
  • 2014 NAAMY Award Winners
  • 2014 Conference Scholarship Recipients
  • Job Opportunity with NAAM
  • Curatorial News 
  • Retail Opportunities
  • Donation Offer

President’s Message

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE
By: Terry Ernest

I am honored to be serving as the new NAAM President.  My name is Terry Ernest, Director of the Wills Sainte Claire Automobile Museum in Marysville, Mich.  I was quite pleased when 10 years ago I learned of an association devoted to automobile museums. As head of a relatively new auto museum (founded in 2001), I was excited by the opportunity to learn how to operate a museum the “correct” way, and in accordance with the principles of established auto museums.  What a wonderful journey of learning it has been!  One of the many things that impress me about NAAM is the professionalism that is exhibited by the many member museums that I have met.  What also impresses me is the passion that our members have for the auto museum industry and their willingness to share their knowledge.  Because of this passion, I see a bright future for our organization.

As the new President, I would like to thank our immediate Past President Jackie Frady for her leadership over the past 3 years.  Jackie has worked diligently to keep NAAM moving forward, and has provided continued value to our membership.  Jackie’s talent and enthusiasm for NAAM is endless.  I can only hope to emulate her in my time in this position.  I would also like to thank the board of directors for their dedication and continued support.

With the annual conference at the Petersen Automotive Museum wrapped up, we can continue to share the energy from this exciting meeting at the NAAM Forum on our association’s website, www.naam.museum.  By sharing your opinions, questions and answers on the Forum, we can keep the spirit of the annual meeting alive all year!   Have you visited the website today?

If you have any questions or suggestions about our association, please feel free to email me at willsmuseum@sbcglobal.netor call my office at 810-987-2854.

In the words of C. Harold Wills (President & Founder of the Wills Sainte Claire Automobile Co.), “If you aim high, you will never shoot low.”

Mission Statement

The National Association of Automobile Museums is a professional center of excellence for automobile museums and affiliated organizations that supports, educates and encourages members to operate according to professional standards of the museum industry.

2014 ANNUAL CONFERENCE
NAAM And World Forum

We sincerely thank The Peterson Automotive Museum for hosting a remarkable joint conference for NAAM and the World Forum for Motor Museums in Los Angeles, Calif. from March 24 – 28, 2014.  We especially thank former NAAM Board member and The Petersen’s Chief Curator Leslie Petersen for proposing the idea of a joint conference and bringing it to reality, Executive Director Terry Karges for generously supporting the program, Associate Curator Mary Brisson for coordinating endless details and the Petersen team for their assistance in many areas. There were 119 attendees representing 10 different countries, nine informative sessions, five tour destinations, four scholarships awarded and 26 NAAMY Awards presented at the festive closing banquet.

The conference began with a welcome reception on a delightful period street setting at The Peterson on Monday evening, March 24, with an abundance of food and beverages. It was a great opportunity to meet new attendees and greet special friends and associates from Australia, Belgium, Canada, Germany, Greece, Japan, New Zealand, Switzerland, UK and USA.

Sessions on Tuesday and Thursday offered valuable information with national and international perspectives relevant to the conference theme, “Attracting New Audiences.”  Wednesday and Thursday featured tours of the Bruce Meyer Collection, the Art Center for Design in Pasadena, the Nethercutt Collection, Mullin Museum and Malamut Collection.  It was sensory overload at its best.  Evenings throughout the conference featured unique activities, including a reception, dinner and touring the Toyota Auto Museum, thanks to NAAM Board member Susan Sanborn; shuttles to explore the Santa Monica Third Street Promenade; a movie night at The Peterson complete with hamburgers, hot dogs, fries, milk shakes, popcorn and American Graffiti.

The closing banquet included insightful comments from key note speaker Dr. Fred Simeone, Simeone Automotive Foundation, and the highly-anticipated NAAMY Awards presentation by Christine Bobco, National Packard Museum. It was a charming evening of warm conversation, and delicious dining complemented by beautiful floral arrangements, while surround by notable automobiles.

Thank You to Our Supporters

We extend our heartfelt appreciation to our generous sponsors, whose support helped make this conference a great success:

  • Hagerty – The Official Insurance Provider of the National Association of Automobile Museums
  • Group Delphi – Generous sponsors of the NAAM Scholarship Program

2014 NAAMY AWARD WINNERS

Congratulations to our 2014 NAAMY Award Winners!  Each award recognizes industry leaders for achievement, professionalism and creativity. NAAMY Awards are designed to further promote professionalism in automotive museum managerial, curatorial, educational and promotional work.  Entries were judged at Kent State University, Trumbull Campus, Warren, Ohio, by professors with expertise in each field of competition.

Congratulations to the following award winners:

2014 NAAMY Award Winners

Division I

Museums with budgets less than $300,000

Interpretive  Exhibits

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – National Packard Museum

2nd Place – Ford Piquette Avenue Plant

Newsletters and Magazines

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Veit Automotive Foundation
2nd place – Wills Sainte Claire Auto Museum
3rd place – Seal Cove Auto Museum

Website Design

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Seal Cove Auto Museum

Division II

Museums with budgets greater than $300,000

Books and Exhibit Catalogs

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – Henry Ford Museum

2nd Place – Reynolds-Alberta Museum

3rd Place – Reynolds-Alberta Museum

Collateral Materials

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – AACA Museum

2nd Place – San Diego Automotive Museum

3rd Place – Auburn Cord Duesenberg Museum

Educational Programs

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – LeMay – America’s Car Museum

2nd Place – National Automobile Museum (The Harrah Collection)

3rd Place – National Corvette Museum

Events and Public Promotions

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – AACA Museum

2nd Place – National Corvette Museum

Interpretive Exhibits

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – AACA Museum & Reynolds-Alberta Museum

2nd Place – National Automobile Museum (The Harrah Collection)

3rd Place – San Diego Automotive Museum

Newsletters and Magazines

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – National Automobile Museum (The Harrah Collection)

2nd Place – National Corvette Museum & LeMay – America’s Car Museum

3rd Place – AACA Museum

Website Design

1st Place NAAMY Award of Excellence – National Automobile Museum (The Harrah Collection)

2nd Place – Auburn Cord Duesenberg Museum

3rd Place – AACA Museum

2014 CONFERENCE SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

Congratulations to four NAAM members who received scholarships to attend the 2014 Annual Conference.  Awards included $1,000 for travel expenses, plus complimentary conference registration.  These valuable scholarships were made possible thanks to a generous sponsorship from Group Delphi (specialists in museum exhibits), combined with a contribution from NAAM.

NAAM is dedicated to helping its members grow professionally through informative annual conferences and networking opportunities. To fulfill this goal, NAAM offers conference scholarships each year. The scholarship program is designed for museums with limited financial resources to pay for their staff to attend.

Congratulations to our 2014 recipients:

Raney Bench, Director, Seal Cove Museum
Nancy Darga, Executive Director, Ford Piquette Avenue Plant
Robert Jeffrey, Executive Director, Northeast Classic Car Museum
Katrina O’Brien, Archives & Collection Manager, World of Speed

CURATIONAL NEWS

A Simple Deaccession

By Drew Van De Wielle
Curator of Collections
Studebaker National Museum

In early 2013, the Studebaker National Museum deaccessioned a 1965 Studebaker Wagonaire. It was not suitable for display, and it was not cost-effective to restore the vehicle to those standards. It appeared to have been painted with a broom over about 50 pounds of Bondo. Another factor that complicated the situation was that although the donor form was complete and proper, the title was never signed and transferred. The donor, the wife of a former Studebaker executive and her husband had long since left this earth. This began the opportunity for me to play detective.

Information on the husband was easy to locate in the St. Joseph County Public Records office. Unfortunately, the state required both donors’ death certificates, and the wife moved out of the county immediately following her husband’s passing.  Having one death certificate in hand I ask myself, “Where do I go from here?” Fortunately, Larry Page and Sergey Brin founded Google some years back to assist in situations similar to mine. Through a lot of research I was finally able to track down the late wife in Madison County, Ind.  A quick phone call and a couple dollars later, the death certificate was in the mail.

Upon the certificate’s arrival, I hurried down to the Bureau of Motor Vehicles with the title, both death certificates and the original donor form. A few weeks later, the title arrived bearing the name Studebaker National Museum. I learned a lot from this situation, most importantly how to prevent things like this from happening in the first place. I ask all of you reading this to please make sure all steps in the donation process are followed to the “T” for the sake of tomorrow’s curators.


RETAIL OPPORTUNITIES

Custom Products Manufacturing and Museum Store Products
Custom Products Manufacturing and Museum Store Products of New Jersey (USA) have been working with museums, gift shops and cultural sites for over 25 years creating magnets, note cards, notepads, bookmarks, puzzles, coasters, key chains and much more. They specialize in custom product development and have just been voted the 2014 Vendor of the Year at this year’s Museum Store Association show.

Please visit their website to view available products that they can create with any of your images with no set-up fee. There are low minimums using your images over a wide range of products to create a story of your venue. Email any product questions you may have.  They can also send a wholesale price list if you wish. Catalogs and samples available on request. museumstoreproducts.com.
Contact:  Marty Gutowski, marty@museumstoreproducts.com

 

AUTO BIOGRAPHY by Earl Swift, $26.99

Tommy Arney has biceps as big as most men’s thighs, knuckles roughened by wrench-turning and blunt-force trauma, some self-applied tattoos and more than a few scars. A grade-school dropout, he’s the owner of Moyock Muscle: a glorified junkyard, where four-hundred old cars litter five scrubby acres in eastern North Carolina. For Tommy, these cars aren’t just scraps waiting to be dismantled for cash. They’re archeological artifacts, fossils of the twentieth-century American experience, of a place and a people utterly devoted to the automobile and changed by it in uncountable ways.

To him, they’re history. But to his town, they’re trash. And so when he acquires a classic ‘57 Chevy in terrible shape and promises to return it to its full glory, he starts on a journey that could restore his financial solvency and respect in his community, as well as save his business from the town officials and creditors who seek to destroy him.

In tracing the ownership of the Chevy from its original owner down to Tommy, Earl Swift’s multifaceted story charts the fortunes of middle-class American experience from the mid-fifties to the present. Swift will intersperse his progressive biography of the iconic Chevy, with an in-depth exploration of its thirteenth-and final-owner, Tommy Arney, a man who himself was written off as unsalvageable.

Written for motor heads and automotive novices alike, AUTO BIOGRAPHY is the story of the decline and rebirth of the American Dream, drawn through the evolution of our most iconic automobile and the improbable heroism of its last owner.

More information here.   Contact: Emily Homonoff, emily.homonoff@harpercollins.com

WHERE THEY RACED: Speed Demons in the City of Angels 

The Award winning film “WHERE THEY RACED: Speed Demons in the City of Angels” is now available on DVD. This documentary tells the story of the amazing automotive innovation and racing history that helped put Southern California on the map. With hundreds of vintage photos, rare archival footage and revealing interviews “WHERE THEY RACED” reunited the ghost tracks of Los Angeles with the cars that raced on them to give these fading memories a final victory lap. Please contact Harry Pallenberg for wholesale prices, email: info@wheretheyraced.com, phone: (213) 810-2376

DONATION OFFER – 1948 PLYMOUTH

Vanya Scott from National Law Enforcement Museum in Washington, D.C. has presented a unique opportunity to NAAM member museums. NLEM recently deaccesioned 1948 Plymouth P15 and is offering to donate it, at no charge. The accepting museum would simply have to accept bearing the cost of transporting the Plymouth from their facility in Forestville, Md. This auto was lovingly restored and has been kept in protected museum storage since the NLEM acquired it in 2006. See the attached informational sheet about the automobile and its provenance. For more information, please contact: Vanya Scott, Registrar, National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund National Law Enforcement Museum, (202)737-7869 (DC office), (202)737-3405 (Fax), (301) 420-8394  (Offsite)

EXHIBITION OFFER

Hans Laurell has offered his unique collection of car cemetery photographs to NAAM member museums for use in an exhibit. These photographs were taken by Hans in a listed and protected car cemetery deep in the forest in Sweden. Several hundred old wrecks were stored there from the 1940s through the late 1960s by two brothers who are no longer among us.  It is a rather unique collection in that the photos show the beauty of mother nature’s reclaim of man’s dear possessions.

Hans’ pictures are not meant to be of a documentary kind, but rather something beautiful even though they depict the slow degradation process. The collection consists of approximately 50 pieces, and the photographs have been displayed in several art exhibitions in Sweden.  Please contact Hans Laurell by email at hans.laurell@tele2.se.
NEWS FROM MEMBER MUSEUMS [NEXT SECTION]

Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles – Boyertown, Penn.

The Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles opened its newest exhibit, Woodrow Wilson, President Electric: Harnessing the Power of Innovation in the Progressive Era on April 10, 2014.  This award-winning exhibit, which is on loan from the Woodrow Wilson House Museum in Washington, D.C., explores the technological advancements made during President Wilson’s administration from 1913 through 1921.  Featured in the exhibit will be the Boyertown Museum’s own 1921 Milburn Light Electric Opera Coupe, which is similar to the Milburn electrics President Wilson’s Secret Service men drove.  This exhibition was supported in part by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and will be on display at the Boyertown Museum until September 30, 2014.

Swope’s Cars of Yesteryear Museum – Elizabethtown, Ky.

Swope’s Cars of Yesteryear Museum of Elizabethtown, Ky. is celebrating its 15th anniversary by featuring “orphan” cars of the early days of the automobile.  These will include a 1910 Brush, Model T and Model A Fords, Packards, Pierce Arrows, LaSalles, a Hupmobile, a Chandler and others. These are cars that bring back pleasant memories.  The museum contains a total of 64 magnificent machines of the past, all original or professionally restored to original condition. The museum is free and all are welcome to come and enjoy.  Open from Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., there is always a knowledgeable hostess there to greet you, answer questions or give a tour.   TripAdvisor gives the Museum a five star rating and has dubbed the Museum as a “must see attraction.”  For a virtual tour, please visit www.swopemuseum.com.

 

 

The Antique Automobile Club of America – Hershey, Penn.


The Antique Automobile Club of America (AACA) Museum proudly announces its newest exhibit, Indian Nation: The Indian Motorcycle and America. This captivating exhibit includes more than 22 Motorcycles and continues to roar on through October 24, 2014.

The stunning selection of rare and show-winning motorcycles on display will showcase early singles and twins, Scouts, Chiefs, and Fours. Some of the exhibit’s highlights include Harrisburg-area racer Bob Markey’s original 1940 Scout, a 1903 Indian –

possibly the earliest original example of the marque – and immaculately restored machines of all eras. Included within the exhibit will be period dealer items and popular culture references.

Please join the AACA Museum this year in enjoying a celebration of some of the most beautiful and meaningful cultural objects created by America, in one of the world’s premier motor museums. This exhibit celebrates and commemorates Indian’s exciting re-entry into the marketplace this year.

Fountainhead Antique Auto Museum – Fairbanks, Alaska

Beginning June 1, 2014, the Fountainhead Antique Auto Museum will showcase a new exhibit called Extreme Motoring: Alaska’s First Automobiles and Their Dauntless Drivers. The museum has assembled a collection of original Alaska automobiles for the exhibit as well as several extremely rare cars identical to the first to arrive in the territory. Among these are Alaska’s very first automobile (built by a young man who had never seen one before) and an unusual Fordson Snow Motor.

The exhibit will also tell the stories of Alaska’s first motorists and the challenges they faced before there were any highways, bridges or snow plows in the area. The extreme cold, deplorable road conditions and an absence of repair shops required a high level of ingenuity and resourcefulness by these bold men. Their inventions and adventures will be illustrated through displays, historic videos and an extensive photograph collection shown throughout the museum’s galleries. For more information, please visit www.fountainheadmuseum.com

NAAM E-NEWS January 2014, Volume 15, Issue 1

January 29, 2014 in Uncategorized

In This Issue

President’s Message

By Jacky Frady

On behalf of the NAAM Board of Directors, I would like to wish all of you a successful and rewarding 2014, both professionally and personally.

Our Board had a very successful Strategic Planning meeting at The Henry Ford in November 2013.  We spent two days under the direction of an exceptional facilitator, Jim Van Bochove, The Henry Ford’s director of workforce development.

In addition to reviewing the results of our Member Interest Survey, there were many exercises that led to a thorough examination of NAAM.  These included, among others, conducting a SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats); drafting an identity statement that captures the essence of what NAAM is; identifying what big questions face our organization, and determining the value-based criteria that will guide our future strategic decisions. This culminated in a revision of our Mission Statement and the development of goals and objectives, along with assignments and timeframes.

The following new Mission Statement has been added to the NAAM Website, along with our list of goals

Mission Statement

The National Association of Automobile Museums is a professional center of excellence for automobile museums and affiliated organizations that supports, educates and encourages members to operate according to professional standards of the museum industry.

Goals

1. Support, educate and encourage member organizations to operate according to professional standards of the museum industry.
2. Provide relevant networking resources and opportunities for members.
3. Address NAAM’s administrative and operational needs.
4. Expand the association’s membership.
5. Enhance membership communications.
6. Create national awareness of NAAM as a primary resource for the automobile museum community.
7. Enhance public awareness of automobile museums as valuable cultural institutions.

We have made significant strides since NAAM was established in 1995. I had the privilege of serving as President from 2000-2002.  At that time, my first goal was immediately implemented by the Board, which was to offer conferences on an annual basis beginning in 2000, rather than every two years.  This was quickly followed by a document that identified goals for key areas of responsibilities (administration and management) and our various committees, and the Board embraced this new structured approach.

Before resuming the position of President again in 2011, our outgoing President Michael Spezia encouraged the Board to hold our first Strategic Planning meeting. It established a new level of professionalism in our leadership and set direction for the next three years. Our Board tackled the goals with enthusiasm and a renewed commitment to the success of NAAM.

In preparation of passing the presidential gavel to Terry Ernest in March 2014, and following Michael’s lead, it was important that we engage in Strategic Planning again in order to provide Terry and the Board with a solid foundation to guide NAAM.

With our new Strategic Plan, the dedication of our Board, and the support and involvement of our members, NAAM is positioned to continue on a highly successful path. We extend our appreciation to all of you for making a meaningful difference in our organization.

2014 Annual Conference

Early Bird Registration Deadline: February 17, 2014

Good News.  The early bird conference registration fee for NAAM members is $400, reduced from $500 reported earlier.  This reduction was made possible by a contribution from NAAM to help support our members.  Also, we are extremely grateful for another generous sponsorship from Hagerty, The Official Insurance Provider of the National Association of Automobile Museums.

When and Where: The 2014 Annual conference will be held jointly between NAAM and the World Forum for Motor Museums at the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, California, March 24 – 28, 2014.  The conference starts on Monday, the 24th, with a Welcome Reception from 5 – 6:30 p.m. and concludes on Friday night, the 28th,  with the closing banquet and NAAMY Awards Ceremony. Please note the dates are the 24th – 28th (early notices stated the 25th – 29th).  The conference is packed with excellent sessions and remarkable tours.  It will be a great professional development and networking opportunity. Please see the attached conference brochure and registration form.  View brochure here.

Theme:  The theme is “Attracting New Audiences” and there will be three days of sessions with topics ranging in scope from reaching non-auto enthusiast visitors to vehicle conservation and preservation.  In addition, two days of field trips will take us up the Pacific Coast Highway and along the streets and boulevards that once made up the beginning of historic Route 66.

Fee: The early-bird registration fee is $400 for NAAM members and deadline to take advantage of this savings is February 17, 2014. This fee will cover the cost of select meals, conference materials and handouts, daily shuttles to and from hotels, offsite tour transportation, and access to the Petersen Museum hospitality suite.

Opportunities: Because it will be a “joint” conference, participants from both NAAM and the World Forum will attend all of the same events at the same time.  This will allow for maximum interaction among the delegates and provide a rare opportunity to liaison with your colleagues from around the world without having to leave the country!

Registration:  Be sure to register early to take advantage of the early-bird discount and to help with planning.  We hope to see everyone in California in March.

Conference Hotel Room Blocks Available

Deadline: January 21, 2014

Make Reservations ASAP: Hotel Room Blocks are now ready for reservations at the following hotels for the 2014 NAAM and World Forum Conference. Room blocks at each of the hotels expire on January 21, 2014, after which they will still honor the preferred rate, but cannot guarantee availability.

For your planning purposes, the conference starts on Monday, March 24, 2014, with a Welcome Reception from 5 – 6:30 p.m. and concludes on Friday evening, March 28, 2014, with the closing banquet and NAAMY Awards Ceremony.

The Wilshire Hotel
6317 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles CA 90048
(323) 413-2148

Reservations:
Call: 1-800-KIMPTON

The Orlando Hotel
8384 W. Third Street
Los Angeles, CA. 90048

Reservations:
Reservation Name/Code:  “Auto”
Website/Link:   www.theorlando.com
Call: (323) 658-6600

Thompson Beverly Hills
9360 Wilshire Boulevard
Beverly Hills CA 90212
aquast@thompsonhotels.com

Reservations:
Reservation Name/Code:  “World Forum 2014”
Website/Link:  N/A
Call:  (310) 273-1400

Farmers Daughter
115 S Fairfax Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90036

Reservations:

Reservation Name/Code:  “The Petersen”
Website/Link:  N/A
Call: (323) 937-3930

Enter the 2014 NAAMY Awards Competition

Deadline:  January 31, 2014

It time to start compiling your entries for the NAAMY Awards Competition.  The deadline is January 31, 2014, so there is plenty of time to get your “winning” entries in the mail. The process is simple, plus you can enter as many categories as you like and you many submit more than one entry in a category.  Please see the attached NAAMY Awards Call for Entries brochure or access the brochure on the NAAM website (www.naam.museum) under “About NAAM.”

Every one of our NAAM member museums is asked to enter to gain important recognition for your museum, which is a primary benefit of earning a NAAMY award. NAAMY’s increase your museum’s prestige not only with your Board and your members, but in your community.  Also, they are a point of interest with donors and when applying for grants.

It’s the perfect, “positive” project to start off your year!  Our new “Call for Entries” brochure and application were distributed via email to all NAAM members and is available on the NAAM website.

Apply for a 2014 Conference Scholarships

Deadline:  February 7, 2014

Apply Now:  Each year NAAM offers scholarships to the Annual Conference to help members grow professionally through informative sessions and networking opportunities. The scholarship program is designed for museums with limited financial resources (annual budgets less than $500,000) to pay for their staff to attend the conference.

When: You can apply anytime and we encourage you to do so to take advantage of this great benefit.  The deadline is February 7, 2014.

How:  Please visit the NAAM website for scholarship criteria, guidelines and the online application (www.naam.museum, select Conferences, then Conference Scholarships.)

Have You Checked the Forum

Have you checked the NAAM Forum? It is an invaluable source of information.  Is it time to write or update your museum’s Emergency Policy?  If so, you can go to the Forum and review the Gilmore Car Museum’s Emergency Policy for helpful ideas.  Would you like to use NAAM’s Collections Policy to revise your policies?  It’s also readily available to you on the Forum.  Are you looking for a roommate for the annual conference to reduce expenses?  Just check the Forum.  In addition, you can ask for advice from other museums about a particular subject.  You can also answer questions posted by others and share your knowledge.  Forum categories include Administration, Curatorial, NAAM Annual Conference, Marketing, Education Programs, Exhibits, Museum Store, Volunteers, Fundraising and Conservation.

Curatorial News

Small Artifacts – Big Stories

Do people only come to automobile museums to see automobiles? Not necessarily. It is important to consider the wide variety of museum visitors, like those with an interest in exploring the deeper story behind the automobile industry, its struggles and successes, its impact on society and culture, and the changing face of the industry.  We must present and interpret these stories using more than just an automobile. This is where our collections of small artifacts come into play in exhibit development.

The incredible vehicles we all have in our collections can be the basis for wonderful exhibits, but to create a comprehensive and contextual exhibit we need small artifacts to aid in the telling of the complex stories of the significance of the vehicles. This does not mean that we can just place a small artifact near the vehicle that is on display and call it a day, we have to make the connection, show the visitor the underlying story, make them see the bigger picture that the automobile and the automobile industry aren’t just about nostalgic memories of our first car or the car the family took on a road trip (although these are also important stories to capture and exhibit). I will use for example the Crawford Auto Aviation Museum Wing here at the Western Reserve Historical Society (WRHS) and my experience with the collection over the last three years working with the institution.

When I first visited WRHS it was as a consultant to survey the Crawford Auto Aviation Collection and I was immediately struck by the fact that the only collections that were on display were the automobile and the aircraft. A few small artifacts, two aircraft engines, and a few early racing trophies were on display and with not much context as to why they were there. Cleveland has a very rich history in both the automobile and aviation industries, but the displays did not convey that story. I was hired on as curator shortly after my consulting project came to an end and in my first year, while the upper gallery space of the Crawford Wing was being completely renovated, I took stock of the small artifacts in the museum’s collection so they could be used in the new exhibit that would be installed in the renovated upper gallery.

During my surveying of the small artifacts I was astonished to find some truly significant pieces housed within the collection. One of the more shocking discoveries was the Hotel Ormond Challenge Cup, which was won by Alexander Winton (Cleveland manufacturer of the Winton automobile) in the first ever sanctioned races at Ormond-Daytona Beach in Florida. The race was as close as they come at the finish line; Winton was racing his Bullet No. 1 against H. T. Thomas in the Olds’ Pirate and claimed victory by only one-fifth of a second. The trophy as an artifact can tell numerous stories, the story of Ormond-Daytona Beach and its legacy as the “Birthplace of Speed,” the story of a riveting race between two legends in automobile racing, or even the beginning of racing at what is now one of the greatest races in NASCAR, but the story we tell with the trophy is the story of a Cleveland manufacturer who would do anything to prove that his vehicles were the best and who became, if not the greatest, one of the greatest American race car drivers in the early days of the automobile. The exhibit the Challenge Cup is part of allows our visitors to not only see two great Winton automobiles on display, but to also learn who Alexander Winton was and what he, and his company, meant to Cleveland and the automobile industry of the early 1900s.

From my research after locating the trophy in the collection, I strongly believe that the trophy may never have been on display since its acquisition, and if it was displayed it was only for a short period of time and without much attention. This trophy happens to be one of many examples within the collections here at WRHS of a small artifact with a huge story of the early American automobile industry attached to it that had been forgotten in storage.

This article isn’t written to say that all of our small artifacts should be on display all at one time, I am merely using it to help us all remember that even though we have impressive vehicles in our collections that are really great to see on exhibit, we also have small artifacts that have interesting stories and help our visitors see the bigger picture of why these cars are so important to our history and the impact automobiles have on our lives. So the next time you develop an exhibit, think about those small artifacts we all have locked away in storage and see how you can add a deeper story to the outstanding automobiles that are on exhibit.

Marketing News

Many non-profit organizations shy away from creating a marketing plan each year because it may seem too sales-centric or too focused on money rather than mission focused.  But marketing, especially content marketing, is a tool that each non-profit must use.  Marketing is a way to convince someone to visit your museum, attend your event, or purchase from your museum’s gift store.

Before you create a marketing plan for your museum, you need to evaluate a few things.

First, define your audience or audiences.  Start generically with “our audience consists of fans of the specific automobile our museum” then elaborate.  There are additional categories of people who visit your museum or who you want to visit your museum.  For example, your additional categories of people might include people 35 years or younger, historians, photographers, artists, educational groups, bus groups, corporate donors, event sponsors, etc.  The important factor in defining your audiences is to be honest in creating a list of every type of group your organization comes in contact with or wishes to come in contact with.

Next, now that you have an idea of whom you want to attract or who you will be reaching out to through marketing efforts – what are you going to say and how are you going to say it?  Will your message be worded the same to every group or will you need to create marketing messages for each group?  Mapping your message content and disseminating information is going to be a very important part of your marketing plan.  Each organization will have different ways of getting information about its museum into the hands of each group.  It might be through mass mailings, email, word of mouth, commercials on the radio or TV.  The important part is to be aware that many mediums might be necessary to reach all of your audiences.

Now that you know who you want to reach, what you are going to say and how you are going to say it – when do you say it?  Create a plan.  Look at a calendar and decide if you are going to try to do a news release or public service announcement weekly or monthly.  Will you do marketing on social media daily or weekly?  How often will be you pay for advertising versus how can you get free mentions on the radio, TV or newspaper?

Having a plan of attack is the best scenario.  For example, I like to decide what museum functions and events I will send news releases about.  From there I look at sending an informative release three to four weeks in advance, and then follow up with a more detailed release the week preceding the event.  However, news works different in every area, so you may need more time or less time.  We share all of our news releases on Facebook, Twitter, and on our website.  Try as many avenues as you can and you will find that some are better for certain groups than others.

Never be afraid to ask for feedback.  Walking through your museum galleries and asking guests how they heard about you or why they chose to visit can provide invaluable information to you.  Maybe a guest saw your Groupon six months ago, and although she didn’t purchase it, she remembered your museum and decided to visit.  Another guest might have seen your billboard and decided to pull off while traveling across the country.  There could be a guest that heard from a friend that your museum was a “must see” so he stopped in.  You can learn from interaction with your guests that some of your marketing is working and some is not.  For example, if you interviewed 1,000 visitors over a course of six months and not one person said that he or she decided to visit you because of seeing one of your brochures, it might be time to evaluate if you continue to pay for the production and distribution of brochures.  Honest in-the-moment feedback from visitors is invaluable.

Finally, create a budget.  You may have an annual budget for your museum marketing, but try to take it a step further and divide that budget into quarters for the year or even by project.  Your main goal for 2014 might be to increase the number of visitors to your museum that are under the age of 35.  A larger portion of your monetary budget might be placed into developing a marketing campaign geared toward that group of people.  It might involve the development of a mobile app, advertisements in a periodical or on a radio station with demographics that fit your target audience.  Budgets give you direction.

The main key to remember when creating a marketing plan for your organization is to be true to your museum and its mission.  Doing so allows you to share information about your organization honestly and in a well-organized, content-laden manner.  Do more than just market your museum – engage and inspire your visitors.

News from Member Museums

Gilmore Car Museum – Hickory Corners, Mich.

The Gilmore Car Museum, located just northeast of Kalamazoo, Mich. in Hickory Corners, has announced the “Gilmore Promise”. Effective immediately, the Museum—considered “America Signature Collection”— has introduced free admission for all K-12 school groups, special discounted family rates, and an extension of their Youth admission rate to include those up to 17 years of age. Inclusive by design, the “Gilmore Promise” represents the Gilmore Car Museum’s commitment to making learning exciting and accessible to everyone in the community, giving families and educators alike the ability to experience and visit the Museum, when they may not have had the means to before.

National Corvette Museum, Bowling Green, Ky.

Get lost in the GPS Adventures Maze and learn how to find your way using GPS! Running from January 13, 2014 through May 4, 2014, the National Corvette Museum presents their “GPS Adventures” exhibit, an interactive look into traditional and modern navigation. Kids and their families can explore the ways that GPS is used, find out where the technology is heading in the future, and discover geocaching, a family-friendly treasure hunting game in the great outdoors. The Museum is open daily, 8am-5pm CST and the exhibit is included with regular Museum admission. $10 adults, $5 kids age 6-16, student and group rates available. Info: 270-781-7973, http://www.corvettemuseum.org/exhibits/gps.shtml

Seal Cove Auto Museum – Seal Cove, Maine

On December 12, 2013, the Seal Cove Auto Museum participated in a Downton Abbey themed event in Portland, Maine for Maine Public Broadcasting Network donors. The Glasers, pictured, dressed according to theme and showed a 1928 Rolls-Royce Twenty Boat Tail, the company’s “small car” for the 1920s. Only the chassis and mechanical parts were actually made by Rolls-Royce; the body was made and fitted by a coachbuilder selected by the owner.

 

 

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